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A Jules Verne novel set at the southern tip of South America goes by the fabulous title,  The Light at the End of the World.   Richard Hudson passed through here recently and sent along the photos in today’s post.

It’s USS ATR-20, built in Camden Maine, launched in January 1943 and ending her days in Ushuaia, Argentina.  The shipyard is now Wayfarer Marine, which I should do a post about one of these days.  The sixth boro–as does The Graves of Arthur Kill– has its very own disintegrating ATR here.

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Fishing vessel Don Herman makes its way past the glacier in Seno, Chile.

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Here’s a smaller fishing boat near Isla Riesco. 

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End of the world aka Strait of Magellan, find tankers there?  Of course.  Here’s Sloman Herakles.

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Ditto ROROs like Fuegino.

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Canal Cockburn . . . they fish there too.

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Puerto Eden . . . some folks live their whole lives there and like it.

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Here are two more pics he sent a few months ago;  I’m impressed with this tender made of repurposed styrofoam.

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Note Issuma in the background to the right.   Here are more.

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Many thanks to Richard for this.  Follow his progress along the edge of the world here.

 

Recognize the red schooner?  It’s shown here approaching the dock in Cape Town last week in a photo by Colin Syndercombe, whose previous photos you can see here.  Here are previous photos of the red boat on tugster, and here is the blog kept by the crew of the red boat, Issuma.  Since leaving the sixth boro in Fall 2010, Issuma has traveled up the St. Lawrence, northward leaving Canada to port and Greenland to starboard, across the Northwest Passage, southward through the Bering Strait . . . you get the flow.

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It’s Richard Hudson.  So if you didn’t click on his blog link above, after traveling southward west of the entire North and South American continents–with a stopover in Easter Island–he rounded Cape Horn, leaving it to port, and kissed Antarctica.  Some time later this week, Issuma will leave Cape Town and head for New Zealand.

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In October 2010, Issuma tied up briefly along the East River in Queens.  Oh the stories he can tell!

Also, much gratitude to Colin for taking these pics.

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Some of you might remember schooner Issuma . . .   ?  Since this post and this one five years ago, Richard Hudson has sailed the schooner from the Northern Atlantic, westward across the Northwest Passage to Alaska, down to Easter Island, and now he’s truly been gunkholing along the western side of southern South America, where there’s an archipelago not unlike parts of the coast of Maine.

The boat below, part of the Naviera Ulloa fleet, is also remarkably similar to the transporter in yesterday’s post.

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Richard took these photos in mid-September, so this is approaching the start of spring here.

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Don Jose, part of the Frasal fleet, is a multi-purpose transporter that sometimes transports commodities such as fish and wine.

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Hull cleaning is done here in much the same way I’ve seen it done in Maine.

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By the way, the distance from this archipelago in the south to the salt mines in the north of the country, Salar Grande de Tarapacá, Iquique-Chile, is about 1500 miles!  These are the mines where much of the road salt stored in Staten Island and elsewhere along the eastern US come from.

Many thanks to Richard Hudson for these photos. Priot to sailing on Issuma, he had a beautiful Tom Colvin-design pinkie schooner called Rosemary Ruth.

So here’s a prime example of a sixth boro delight.  No, THAT inspector is not immersed in the sixth boro!  But the object of the inspection sailed into the East River last year in late August from the Sound and then out again heading north, up the Hudson River.  Note the place and date on this foto, which I borrowed from Richard Hudson’s Issuma blog.  Click here if you don’t know (like me) where the “Dolphin and Union Strait” is located.

I took this foto of Issuma last October just off the Rondout, where Issuma anchored.  Who would have guesed that Issuma, one year on, would be NORTH of Whitehorse!

Here’s another from that same morning.  Another schooner . . . Rosemary Ruth . .  was buddied up alongside.

This foto, also from Richard’s blog, shows the exact date.

So how does one get a 50′ schooner from the Rondout to the Yukon is less than a year?   Some thoughts come to mind:  very large truck, a C-17, squadrons of helicopters . . .  or by just sailing it through the northwest passage, doing what a namesake failed to do some 400 years back!

Congratulations to Richard Hudson and his crew, who on Columbus Day 2010 poured me a distinctly tropical drink on Issuma, docked in Long Island City, Queens.  Cheers.  I trust you passed the mustachioed one’s inspection gloriously.

Issuma has traveled off four continents in the past two years:  Europe, Africa, South America, and North America.  In the past year alone, Issuma‘s landfalls have included Argentina and Nunavut.  Yet, Issuma‘s skipper Richard Hudson has logged hundreds of hours sailing in the sixth boro, as well.  His tow, the vessel slinging here on the towline–for sale–is none other than the charming Rosemary Ruth.

Issuma is Richard’s third schooner.  See all the stories from Issuma back to Orbit II (which now lies thousands of feet below the surface of the North Atlantic between Iceland and Ireland)  here.

Here Richard and Gabriela pose in front of the two schooners at anchor off Thomas Cole-base, Catskill.

Issuma–unstepped mast lying cabintop–by now might be off farther north and west, headed for Toronto before winter closes the Erie Canal.  The tow will be left behind in Catskill, awaiting a new owner.

Here Richard and Bowsprite return from a sounding trip up Catskill Creek.

More fotos of the trip up the Hudson Valley coming soon.  As an aside, with a vista like this, I find it credible that Henry Hudson, making this trip 401 years ago, could have believed this waterway would lead through the continent.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  If you are interested in Rosemary Ruth, contact Richard today.

Related:  Rosemary Ruth IS a signed piece of art.  See the weld signature here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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