You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ira S. Bushey and Sons Shipyard’ tag.

Here was the first post with this title, from almost 9 years ago!  But for the first image of Cheyenne, I can go back to February 2007 here.

Anyhow, less than a half hour after leaving the dock in Port Newark, she rounds the bend near Shooters Island,

departs the modified Bayonne Bridge,

exits the KVK for the Upper Bay and North River . . .

and a half day later, shows up in Poughkeepsie, as recorded by Jeff Anzevino and

Glenn Raymo.

Jeff and Glenn, thanks. Uncredited by Will Van Dorp.

And Cheyenne, tugboat of the year but not present then at the 2015 Tugboat Roundup in Waterford . . .  she’ll be there this year on her way to a new home a good 1000 nm to the west.  Here and here are my photos from 2015, which already seems long ago.  I’ll miss the Roundup this year because I’ll be eastbound on the waterways from Chicago, but there’s a chance we’ll pass Cheyenne on the way!!

Is she the last Bushey tug to leave the sixth boro?  If so, it’s a transition in an era or something . . . .

Safe travels and long life in the fresh waters out west.

 

 

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Chancellor . . . built pre-World War 2 in Brooklyn.  This post is timed to satisfy a request from Bob Price  . . . as follows:  “as part of a group working to restore the tug boat Chancellor, I am trying to find any extant engineering documentation regarding her construction details.  Built by Bushey & Sons in 1938, it is currently in the keeping of the Waterford Maritime Historical Society and my group of volunteers recently arranged to have it moved into dry dock at Lock 3 of the Erie Canal where we laboriously winterized it, pumped its bilges dry and a making plans to create a very thorough hit list of things to do.   If you would be so kind as to point me in the direction of any person or entity that might have access to drawings or any engineering related stuff pertaining to the Chancellor I would be most appreciative.  Thanks for your time.     Bob Price    Knox, NY      518.895.8954   The first three fotos below come from Bob.

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The next three I took in 2010.  Here she’s cruises north on the Hudson headed for Troy.

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Here’s she’s downbound following W. O. Decker into the Federal Lock.

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Housedown, she prepares to depart the bulkhead in Waterford.

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And in my foto from either 2006 or  2007 she goes nose-to-nose with Gowanus Bay.

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If anyone knows the whereabouts of construction drawings or other plans for Chancellor, you can also email me and I’ll pass the info on to Bob and his group.  Click here to see Fred tug44’s video of Chancellor being pushed upstream by the tagteam of Ben Elliot and National.

July is officially “gallivant month” this year, but as an update on yesterday’s “Bridge” post . . . the tow got somewhere out of foto range before daybreak;  when I got up to check progress on AIS at 5 am local time, it was already south of the Holland Tunnel vents.  I guess we’ll have to catch the mobile bridge when it heads from the Weeks yard up to its home over the Harlem River . . . later this month?  Also, since I’m out yon and hither this month, check Bonnie’s blog for sixth boro events.

Not on the Canal . . .  check out Royal Argosy . . . and find something strange about her design.  My answer at end of post.

Crabber Wizard, 1945 built by Brooklyn’s own Bushey yard, and one of the feature vessels of “Deadliest Catch,”  served as a YO-153 Navy oiler and a molasses tanker before its transformation into crabber in 1978.  Some YO-153s are now local reefs.

Another Bushey oiler-turned-crabber is Blue Gadus, launched two years earlier than Wizard.  Brooklyn’s yards have sent boats to the seven seas, above and beneath.

Like Wizard and Blue Gadus, Sahara hopes for a second life.  Any guesses about her previous life from this stern shot?

She was a also government ship,  R-101 Oceanographer, launched from Jacksonville, Florida in April 1964, now possibly transforming into a yacht.

Freemont Tug Co.’s Blueberry began life in 1941 in Tacoma as a 65′ buoy tender.

Ranger 7 was originally built for the United States Forest Service in 1926, but I’ve located no vintage fotos.

Maris Pearl is a repurposed 1944 Navy tug.  This foto was taken outside the Canal.

Amak was built in Goble, Oregon in 1916 and worked in Ketchikan, Alaska.

Newt, 1924.

Skillful?  Maybe, I just have no clue about her past.

And this returns us to Royal Argosy.  Notice what feeds into the forward stack . . . or rather, what does not feed into it.  It’s a faux-funnel, maybe-smoke from nowhere, a mild form of “amelioration.”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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