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Heraclitus has to be the classical philosopher most referred to on this blog.  I thought of this person again as I returned into the city after my longest ever so far time away;  this is a familiar place of six boros, and yet it does not seem familiar.  It is new, renewed by multiple sunrises and by my recollection as I gallivanted afar, seeing new places.   We enter beneath the GW, which I’ve never seen lit up this way.

On the water side of a wild and dynamic clutch of architecture, Pegasus stands guard,

 

As we make an initial run to the Upper Bay, we pass a renewed Harvey, a resolute Frying Pan, and an ever working Chandra B.

Hunting Creek follows Chandra B up to the cruise terminal.

USCGC Shrike waits near FDNY’s Hudson River station and the sprouting Pier 55.

Ernest Campbell brings more fuel to the cruise terminal.

Sarah Ann (I believe) delivers waste, passing the Battery, where Clipper City awaits another day of passengers.

As we circled back to dock, an unfamiliar tug was southbound.

Robert T and that livery are not ones I recognized, until

I realized this was the old Debora Miller.  Who knew!!??

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are posts one through five in this series.

 

 

 

 

 

Just a photo essay, Vane tugs and barges in the KVK through all the daylight hours today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a different perspective on the sixth boro, different from my more usual ones.  And in this morning light, Sarah Ann looks like a beauty as she heads somewhere past Robbins Reef Light and

well . . . along that island.

Let’s continue trying to get some different POVs.  Patricia has some fine lines here accentuated by the low light of dawn.

Elk River and Hunting Creek pass, with missions in opposite directions.

Evelyn Cutler moves product for somewhere up the North River.

Paula Atwell moves garbage containers past an incoming green new shipment, and

Julie Anne, a new one for me in the sixth boro although I have posted a “down south” photo of her here, moves a scow up toward the Passaic River.  Notice that until I got to the Norfolk tugs, there were no tugs with even a drip of red paint on them in this post?

And finally, Brian Nicholas is neither a huge nor a small tug, 72′ loa, but as she passes the stern of CMA CGM Nabucco, she

looks almost like a toy.  My first reaction was excitement  . ..  erroneously thinking I’d see either the elusive  Susan E. or Elizabeth Anna.  But don’t get me wrong, greetings to Brian Nicholas!

All photos and sentiments here the product of and/or the opinion of Will Van Dorp.

 

 

To continue on from yesterday’s list . . . I’ve done chugster, jetster, even a gangster . . . though you have to search for it here by scrolling a bit,  but the blog is called tugster, and I’m proud of that some chuckles notwithstanding . . . .

This is a cross section for the 250th time, a random sampling of what tugboats were working in the Upper Bay of NYC aka the sixth boro on a given morning earlier this week.   By the way, the 001 version of this title dates from October 2007.

Vane Brothers boats and barges abound.

Hunting Creek stands by a set of four of them, while

Wye River travels light past the ferry racks.

Franklin Reinauer travels light past the count-defying load of containers on a ULCV over in Global.

ATB Freeport and Chemical Transporter transfer cargo over at the east end of IMTT, at

the same time

Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire do.

CF Campbell stands by with Long Island.

 

And passing an unusual but new landmark along the sixth born margins,

Patrice McAllister makes her way west.  Quick . . . name a larger global garment retailer than H & M, and what the initials H & M expand to?  Answers here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose fingers froze and cold tears flowed while having the float-about, look-about.

 

Here are all the previous names posts.

I sometimes take photos and imagine how I’ll use them, and then later, another photo offers great juxtaposition.  Like this one.  I used it before here.

But then another photo jumps into my vantage point and camera, and suggests a different use.  We have The Commissioner above and Commodore below, so

that makes me wonder whether and where might be other boats like Contender, Confuser,  . . . Collaborator, which strikes me as a good name for a crew rowboat or a three-person kayak.

The NYC Ferry has grown quickly and chosen some interesting names.  Each time I see this one, my brain makes me say Opportunity comes and

Opportunity goes.  People who arrive late at the dock might report that they missed the opportunity.

I know this boat but I don’t know why a stranger might have difficulty identifying it.

Both sides had this treatment.

ONE Stork showed up here a while back, pink or magenta, and I missed it.  Next time.  In the fall.

There’s an announcement coming tomorrow.

 

Genesis Vision has just gone onto the wire from alongside, and

tightens it, moving the barge outbound for Florida.  Click here for a 2013 photo of Genesis Vision as Superior Service.

Stephen Reinauer steams out to the Lower Bay to stand by with a barge just

vacated by Timothy L.

McKinley Sea returns in the direction of its barge out in the Upper Bay.

Hunting Creek provides a needed boost as Pokomoke moves Double Skin 39 out of the dock at IMTT.

In the fog, there’s a negotiation going on between Evening Mist and Evening Star that took me a bit to figure out . . . Ah . . .

Star goes into the notch of B. No. 250, and then Mist assists in the 180 degree turn.  Note the pink ribbon on Mist’s stack?

My father would say, “Dean‘s lit up like a Christmas tree.”

Helen Laraway . . . assisting?

 

The truth about Helen is that she was waiting as Anthem was departing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Some people are up before dawn on Easter because of work.  But at sunrise this morning from Bard Street and looking west . . . it was gray.

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Looking east . . . dawn smudged the rosy fingers’ painting.   Lucy Reinauer pushed RTC 83 in that direction, while the Moran 6000 hp tractors returned to the barn after helping Hanjin Shenzhen out to sea and southbound.

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And the Bayonne windmill has revived its current production.  Passing it in order were JRT Moran,

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and James D.  In the distance, that’s Barney Turecamo and

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Miriam also passed.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Hunting Creek also worked their way into Easter morning.

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And I decided to get to work also.  All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did versions 1 and 2 of this in previous years.  Here was a different take on Easter.  As for Caitlin Ann’s being blue . . .

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here’s how I first saw her.

 

Here are the previous posts in this series, and I’m finding that in the four years since the last installment, things have changed . . . and not.  Most of these boats haven’t appeared in the previous four.    The livery and logo remain the same, but there are some new boats.  Can you figure out how two of the following photos differ from then others?

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Chesapeake, launched 2006

Once while listening on VHF, I thought there was a new boat in town called “honey creek.”

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Hunting Creek, 2011

 

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Quantico Creek, 2010

 

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Wicomico, 2005

 

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Red Hook, 2013

 

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Tangier Island, 2014

 

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Fells Point, 2014

 

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Susquehanna, 2006 with Savannah

 

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Christian . . .  1981

 

So, obviously, Christian, being a crew boat, differs from all the others.   Another difference, though, is that Chesapeake and Susquehanna were not photographed in the sixth boro.  Identifying one location might be easier than the other.  Guesses?

By the way, I know I’ve seen Kings Point, but I seem not to have a photo.

Answer soon.

Kodiak . . . is ex-Vane and Allied.

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Hunting Creek is Maryland-built for Vane.

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Charles A has carried at least four previous names.

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Specialist, I believe the oldest in the set today,  . . . has low sleek lines for an almost 60-year-old vessel.

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When this Pegasus came into the sixth boro, she lacked the upper wheelhouse.

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Atlantic Salvor has for some years–since this one left–been the largest tugboat in the sixth boro.  Rivaling Atlantic Salvor a few years back was the rescue tug turned super yacht called Lone Ranger.

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And finally, for today, it’s Eric McAllister passes Ultra Colonsay, discharging salt over at Atlantic Salt.

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All photos over the last few days by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Pierre Kfoury for sending along this very clever photo in shades of black, white, and gray of Bruce McAllister he took up by New Hamburg, NY.  In Pierre’s photo, I like those gray shades and gray reflections too.

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More shades of spray take us to Emerald Coast, passing Chesapeake Coast.

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Sitting out on deck has to be evidence of a warm heart on a vessel

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that will miss Mardi Gras in a warm place.

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Frozen spray reinforces the fenders maybe?

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The glaze coats the hull with a very light-gray layer.

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Even on this vessel with a hot name . . . the icy shading is present.  Is it true that this tanker was briefly in port to deliver the love drug —phenethylamine— to those of us crowded on the edges of the sixth boro?   A few years ago, this vessel was in the sixth boro with the name Golden Venus;  for photos of her and other vessels with fantastic names, click here.

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So . .  50 shades of spray?  How about 56 or 65 or  . . .spray, gray, play . . . ?  The number is only limited by the imagination and the eye.

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I had gone looking to get a photo of this vessel, but by the time I got to my favorite cliffs, they all have headed to warmer waters.  And given the usual fashion of mermaids, I can’t blame them.

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Thanks again to Pierre Kfoury for his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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