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Vermont Sail Freight . . . south bound.  Click here for their ports of call and dates.   More fotos courtesy of Fred Wehner.




I’m eager to see them with masts stepped and sails billowing.


If anyone wishes to contribute fotos of the vessel making her way south and calling at ports headed south, please get in touch.

Does “shiny” help you beat away the blues?  My first thought upon seeing this boat was that it might be made by the same folks who designed the stern of a Citroen DS.  Any guesses on the price you’d pay to buy this 44′ runabout?


Some folks cruise slowly,


and other go so fast I couldn’t make out the name.


Here’s a Texas-flagged Refuge on the Hudson.



I could see getting this for some professional development.



Back to our shiny 44-footer.  It’s a Zeelander that’ll set you back a staggering $1.34 million!  That’s a Zeelander, as in Zeeland, Michigan.  Here’s a short video about the builder, Leon Slikkers.


And many thanks to Mage, very frequent commenter on this blog.  Mage beats the hot weather blues by going down to see the ships, as she did here on the pier to see USS Midway.  Click here to see more boat pics Mage took recently.


All fotos–except the one of Mage and cousin–by Will Van Dorp.

Although Magdalen Island was asked nicely, it


would not move.  It would NOT divert its course 15 degrees north.


Thanks to Dock and Kate Shuter for sending along these fotos.






happens. . .


and we feel major headaches.


If anyone out there needs to be convinced of the beauty of the Hudson Valley less than 100 miles north of the big city, take a glance at this foto by Tim Hetrick showing tanker Icdas 11 escorted by a paparazzi savvy eagle.

The foto below shows sloop Clearwater in mid-June arriving at the music festival that shares the same name.


A minute or so earlier . . . Clearwater rounded the bend following Woody Guthrie toward the shallows.

But if anyone has notions of operating a wooden vessel, it’s important to consider the regular maintenance.  Here was a post from about three years ago about work on Clearwater.  Currently way upriver this


is happening again.  All the following fotos now come thanks to Paul Strubeck.  In mid-December, Clearwater was downrigged and hauled out near Albany at Scarano Boat Building and


gently placed onto Black Diamond, with tug Cornell nearby.


Securing the big sloop for travel takes care and time, more time than there is light at the winter solstice end of the year.




But when all’s fast, the trip to where the winter maintenance crew can begin.


Click here for an article about Clearwater‘s winter home in the shadow of the Hudson River Maritime Museum.


Many thanks to Paul for sending these along.  It looks like I need to find time to get up to the Rondout.  The first two fotos in the post are mine.

The event is called Clearwater’s Great Hudson River Revival, so indeed, it’s a water festival, a river fest  started by a folksinger, now 93,  who cares deeply about

the river that flowed past his birthplace.  A river festival means boats.

Of course, Clearwater in the distance is the flagship of this festival, and the big sloop spawned the smaller sloop Woodie Guthrie closer in.

The festival takes place on a peninsula where you see the tents in the middle of the foto.

It’s called Croton Point Park, about 30 miles north of Manhattan’s north tip.

But this location is surrounded by shallow water, so temporary docks are needed, which means small shallow draft tugboats like Augie (1943 and on the first job of her new life) and

Patty Nolan (1931 and available for charter). . .   And the red barge is Pennsy 399 (1942!!) .

Also taking passengers during the festival is Mystic Whaler, here with Hook Mountain in the distance.

Here’s the northside of Croton Point last evening looking toward Haverstraw.

Exactly five years ago I took this foto from a small boat just off Pioneer‘s bowsprit.   Here are more fotos from that day.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who might go back for some music tomorrow.

A week ago, I posted this foto (last one scrolling through) and asked where it was taken.   Answer is Brazil.  And the relationship to this foto is what?  Buchanan 12 was built 1972 in Louisiana, but the black ship in the foreground handmade with woods such as olanje, jaquera, pau oleo . . .

was built in Brasil about 50 miles southwest of Salvador.  It’s a replica of Niña as seen from  . ..  Pinta.  Both hurried through Manhattan earlier this week on their way here in Newburgh until this Sunday.

Next  stop is then Rochester, NY (click for schedule)  . . . which means unstepping the masts and traversing the Erie Canal via Oswego.  From there it’s the Great Lakes and ultimately the Mississippi.

Pinta was launched in 2005 from the same shipyard in Brasil, about 1/3 larger to accommodate school groups.  Here I quote from the site:  both vessels were built by the Assis de Santana family, who have built wooden vessels there for eight generations using 15th century “Mediterranean Whole Moulding [techniques] with mechanically generated geometric progressions known as graminhos.  Shipwrights were using traditional tools, such as axes, adzes, hand saws and chisels, as well as utilizing traditional construction methods; and finally, the tropical forests of Bahia provided a source for the various naturally-shaped timbers necessary to build a large wooden ship. ”  This makes me think of Onrust upriver.

Surely  record of this visit

is being created by local artists.

This tender is said to have been built by an Assis de Santana family member, 14 years old at the time.

The catalyst for this project, John Patrick Sarsfield, has a tragic ending.

A few weeks ago Bounty was up this way.  From the dock in Newburgh looking south as Buchanan 12 pushes her hundreds of truckloads of crushed stone, you can see Bannermans Castle, marking the northern end of the Hudson Highlands.  Here is another “ghosts” post I did about Bannermans about five years ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Well, maybe not that different, since I’m not reinventing myself.  But enjoy these fotos, and while looking at them, fugure out where you’ve seen this tug before on this blog.  Look carefully.  It took me about 30 seconds to recognize the red tug below as a more pristine version of a tug that appears here periodically.  Fotos were taken in the 1980s by Seth Tane, who generously shares them here.

In its current state, this tug, using the same name, has considerably more equipment on board.  What hasn’t changed is the profile of the Palisades in the background of some of these fotos, taken in or near Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

This tug today still operates commercially, pulling loads like the one below.

A major change in the tug relates to visibility;  the portholes would make me claustrophobic. However, since the mystery tug was built on the Great Lakes, maybe portholes conserve heat better in winter.   Tug Daniel A. White, below left, has more conventional glass.  Anyone know what has become of Daniel A. White?

If you guessed Patty Nolan, you were correct.  Here’s her current work page, showing her original form.  Click on the following links for a sampling of Patty Nolan fotos from the past few years, like modelling 2011 summer beach fashion, at work in the East River, moving snail-like with house,  and finally . . . for now . . . Patty Nolan outlaw fashionista.

Thanks much to Seth for these fotos from the early 1980s.

Below is a foto (poor quality)  that I took in December 2000.  I clearly had forgotten how barren the Jersey City shore just north of the Morris Canal looked a mere 11 years ago, almost reminiscent of a desert town.  This foto was among a batch my sister handed me at Thanksgiving, but those foto gave me

an idea.  Maybe you have fotos in a drawer, a shoebox, and album, etc. that show some part of the sixth boro and/or vessels there.  And if I may so brazen, tugster would LOVE to see any fotos you might come across and are willing to share.

Here was Something Different 4.

Actually this is Kristin 3, counting the mystery vessel post.  Let’s start in the wheelhouse, aka ship’s office, looking to port.  Notice the gauging equipment, sound-activated telephone, all the manuals.

Over on the starboard side below the controls, here’s a closeup of the pushbutton engine order telegraph, which corresponds to

this twin in the engine compartment, the engineer’s station looking forward.  The light down here is provided by portholes above.

Here’s a closeup of the starboard EMD 16-645-E2–if I recall–12-567

I’m guessing that Schoonmaker was a parts/service company?


Looking down/forward from the fiddley at port engine

After getting this foto of Kristin Poling just north of the Tappan Zee in May 2008, I wondered what I’d see through the portholes above the stern, and now

I know it’s a naturally-lit out-of-the-weather access area to the rudder machinery.

Note the folding joint on the mast.  What lies below these portholes is

the galley.  Again, the natural lighting is remarkable.    A note about these fotos . . . Kristin has been idle for several months now, and no attempt was made during this foto shoot to “spruce-up” any of the areas.

Large wooden door leads to the freezer, and the smaller door beside it  opens a defacto fridge.

Any guesses what lies beyond these portholes on the port side?

One of the crew’s quarters with sink, locker, and

bunk.  Is this color an off-white, yellowed with age, or was this “institutional buff”?

And these covered portholes on the forward port side of the “stern island” leads to

the engineer’s cabin.  The two recessed “bookshelves” are the interior of the portholes above.  I wonder the vintage of the desk and

(as seen from the portside porthole) the bunk with shelving beneath?    Excuse the blurry foto.

Corresponding portholes on the starboard side lead to the captain’s cabin.

I hope you enjoyed the tour of Kristin as much as I did.

A near-twin of KristinChester A. Poling–was my introduction to the name Poling, although it was another company.  I heard about Chester A. in the 1990s from a diver in Cape Ann, MA.  Like Kristin, Chester A. was launched in 1934 from the shipyard in Mariner’s Harbor.  Originally 251′, both were lengthened by a 30-foot midsection in 1956.   From this foto, it appears the bow bulwarks on Chester were less protected.  Click on the image to get to Auke Visser’s fabulous site, from which the foto is taken.  Take your pic here from a wealth of video by folks diving on Chester.

Again, many thanks to Ed Poling and Jim Ash for the opportunity to see/foto Kristin in her dotage.    Thanks to you all for reading and commenting.  Special thanks to Johannah for the info on all-welded construction article and to Sachem1907  on the identification of the locks, which confirms operation by these vessels onto the Great Lakes.  I welcome more info and further history on these vessels of past era.

My all-time favorite fotos of Kristin were taken here less than a year ago by Paul Strubeck and “lightened-up” by  tugster.

Stories about parties here made this my primary destination for the recon.  Binghamton is the sole survivor of six identical “double-ender” steam ferries built in Newport News, although by cursory external examination, I’d say calling her a survivor at this point is an exaggeration.

Binghamton arrived in a sixth boro at a time when 150 or so similar ferries served these waters!    How many crossings carrying how many passengers would she have seen between 1905 and 1967?   How many livelihoods?   Her passenger capacity was 986!

Plus vehicles.  In the early years that would be horses, too.

Anyone can share fotos inside in the heyday of the restaurant?  How do I get permission to get fotos of her interior today?  It seems tragic for her to crumble into the river like

these docks slightly to the north, which come

with their own engine parts depot.    Maybe this is a remnant of the disappeared shad fishery of Edgewater.  Here are names of some of the last shad fishermen.  By the way, in the foto above, that’s the Way Upper West Side across the water.

From Edgewater Marina, I followed Thomas Witte and Cheyenne southbound,

past the Crab House, past these barges

of yore,

and past this pier housing with storage for cars beneath.  Now if I lived here, I’d surely buy and amphicar . . . and maybe equip it like an alligator tug . . . and if 10,000 other residents of the sixth boro shoreline had similar equipment . . .   I pause in contemplation.

So ends the recon report.  I need to get up here again soon and then continue my tramp up to the north of the GW Bridge, where tropical

birds like these inhabit the trees.  Who knows what else I might find there?  I’m not in the commercial blogging business, but I do intend to check out Cafe Archetypus.  Anyone recommend it?

All fotos and any errors here by Will Van Dorp.

Note:  the interactive map (first image in Loose Ends 1) can get you to this area: just head north along the river.  Binghamton can clearly be seen, although on the map, the crane barge is not alongside.

For some historical fotos of the area of my recent tramp, click here for railyards, banana piers, pier houses, the “bridge that never was” thank you very much, 1950s cars awaiting a ship for export, crashed ferry stabilized by a tugboat,  old style planting poles for shad nets, and you can sift through here to find more nuggets.

Continuing my effort to see the sixth boro from every imaginable angle, I recently walked Hudson River Waterfront Walkway between Port Imperial and Edgemont Marina.  This post covers the first portion of the walk.  Follow on the interactive map below; click on the map/satellite view to make it live .  If you’re from outatown, that’s Manhattan to the lower right . . . specifically the 59th Street Sanitation Pier.    But it’s the view from the Jersey side I focus on here.

This set of fotos represents a starting point for me, evidence of a reconnoitre.  What is now rows upon rows of “luxury condos,” was at one time sets upon sets of rail infrastructure.

Below is the crumbling pier directly south of Son Cubano NJ.  Ironically, not more than a mile south of here were the Seatrain Lines docks with service via Seatrain New York and Seatrain Havana between  . . . New York and Havana.

This is the view of the pier “east” of Son Cubano.  Notice it, like most of them now, is a loose end, a pier from and too nowhere.   Now they are reminders, and should be treasured as such, although I know they will not be here 10 years from now.   Click here (bottom of post) for the quote from Rebecca Solnit . . . on ruins as memories . ..  or clues to seek out missed memories.

The piers are alive . . . although not with shipping or commerce.  Notice the Manhattan passenger terminal on the other side.

Who knows what vessels last cast lines off from these cleats and bollards?    Anyone have a sense of where a trove of fotos showing these docks used can be found?

This loose end is off Buffalo Court, but what town looks upon this?    West New York?  Guttenberg?  Will Port Imperial become a town?

More pilings reminding us that  a different life was led here 50 and 100 years ago on the Jersey side of the sixth boro across from and slightly south of Soldiers’ and  Sailors’ Monument and Riverside Church.  In the far distance, the tug is Bohemia;  Kristy Ann is the nearer one.

The serviceable pier Kristy Ann Reinauer passes here covers a pipeline.  For what . . . I don’t know.  Remember, this post just conveys what I saw on the recon walk.

When the area was developed, vessels in the water became starting points for fill.  What cargoes did this barge carry and along what routes?

I googled “bulls ferry” and “jacobs ferry” hoping to learn what vessel is depicted.  Find out what I got by clicking here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Coming soon . . . the journey into Edgewater, where Joseph Mitchell more than half a century ago studied the shad fishermen.   Any errors of fact . . . they’re mine.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.


October 2016
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