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OK, here’s tomorrow’s post today . . . Wednesday’s news coming on Tuesday.  The snow happened today, so let’s see it today.

Here was 3.  And another snowy post.  The first three fotos here come compliments of Brian DeForest.  Here, hanging on the wall are Hunting Creek and Coastline Bay Star.

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Davis Sea–I believe–is practically invisible to the naked eye.  Here was Davis Sea as a K-Sea vessel almost four years ago.

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Scotty Sky passing alongside the aptly named Alpine Loyalty.

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Brooklyn at the #9 buoy.

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And Hoechst Express inbound from sea.

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By late morning, the snow was slowing down in the sixth boro, here on the landside of Gage Paul Thornton and Thornton Bros.

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Many thanks to Brian DeForest for the top three fotos;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

Snow is snow and not the same is ice, but cold weather makes me want to keep a watch on this site for the Hudson River Ice Yacht Club, which always has the news on iceboating in the Hudson Valley.

Any guesses on the identification of vessel/structure X above?  I assumed it was military.  Answer follows.

The long frustrating lines at the gas pumps locally are NOT the result of absence of fuel in the port.  From l to r here are tankers Queen Express, Romo Maersk, Sira, and Mercini Lady . . .

Closer up of Romo Maersk and Sira.  Although these tanker are in port, they’re not at the usual docks because

this activity is in high gear there:  hydrographic surveying for hidden obstacles and possibly

retrieving them.   Tug here is Harry McNeal.

Oil is being moved, however, in the likes of barge Edwin A. Poling, pushed by Kimberly Poling,  and

barge Pacific, pushed by North Sea and assisted here by tug Pegasus. Clipper Legacy is obscured at the dock there also.

Here it is . .  vessel/structure X aka Happy Delta bringing in some large structures marked

NYC Sanitation.   ?

It’s great to get this angle of Pati R. Moran, but noteworthy also . .  the orange vessel in the background . . . it’s Duncan Island, bringing NYC its bananas.

Western Highway . . . transports who knows what vehicles

And surely some parts of the port are flowing when APL Cyprine ingresses as Hoechst Express egresses.

Note the tan colored vehicles atop  . . .  port side.  Charles D. McAllister escorts.

JLTVs mebbe?  Among other things  . . .

And the two final images thanks to AIS marinetraffic . . . .  the inflow Monday morning at 0800 . . . and

today, Tuesday, at 1400.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is mindful that many folks on land around the sixth boro still lack electricity, heat, and cable communications; and walk up and down dark stairs in high rises to get MREs passed out by the National Guard.    Temperatures this morning here were in the mid-30s . . . i.e., just a hover above freezing.

I’ll never claim to know all the sixth boro stories although I’ve chosen as a goal to hear more of them.  Savannah has a great waterfront story.  See if you can figure it out from this set of fotos;  I will explain at the end of post.  Call this . . . what’s Flo Mar’s tale?   Call her Florence Martus, if you want, and click here for the spoiler if you wish, but indulge me and see the fotos first.  She did get a Liberty ship named for her.  Be a sport, and follow the fotos.

She waves at Hoechst Express,  whose crew wave back, as do

crew on YM Los Angeles, once they see what they’re seeking.

So is it the friendly waterfront, the large hotel windows convenient for … er … flashing, accidental or intentional, something else?  But anyhow, crews seemed vigilant

binoculars at the ready to find waving folk,

waving girls maybe,

and then they wave back with exuberance no matter the ship.

Crew of Morning Chorus not only waved but also shouted audible new year’s greetings to lubbers reveling alongshore.

So Savannah’s hospitality has gotten enshrined.  So the story of Flo Mar, as reported in Savannah & the Georgia Coast by Jim Morekis goes like this:

“Beginning at age 19, Flo Mar–who actually lived a few miles downriver on Elba Island–took to greeting every passing ship with a wave of a handkerchief by day and a lantern at night, without fail for the next 40 (plus) years.  Ship captains would often return the greeting with a salute of their own on the ship’s whistle, and word spread all over the world of the beguiling woman who waited on the balcony of that lonely house.

Was she looking for a sign of a long lost love who went to sea and never returned?  Was she trying to get a handsome sea captain to sweep her off her feet and take her off that little island?  No one knows for sure.”

Now I began by denying expertise about New York stories, and  harbor folk  surrounding the sixth boro may very well have characters as compelling as Flo Mar.  I just don’t know them.  Anyone throw out some names?  Of course, New York does have a very impressive waving girl of its own aka Lady Liberty, as I wrote about here.

One of my favorite New York City novels begins to enlarge the intriguing truth of a failed writer named Herman Melville working out his last days as a night (the insignificant shift) customs inspector in the harbor.  Melville actually held this post for 19 years starting around 1866.  The novel,  The Night Inspector by Frederick Busch, is a great read if you’re trying to see the sixth boro of another era.

Photos, WVD.

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