You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Hoboken’ tag.

Actually this first in this series started here.   The ship is SS California, launched in April  1923.  If you look at the top photo in the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see this SS California started with three funnels, although it’s likely that two of the three were dummies.  Extra “dummy” funnels were “style enhancements,” added for appearance.  Notice the Lipton Tea building along the water in Hoboken?  The photo was cropped as shown.  Anyone help identify the tugboat company?

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As I mentioned in the September post linked above, I bought an album of prints at an antique shop in Oswego NY on one of my stops there this summer.  We were spending extra time there to replace a prop dinged on an immovable uncharted underwater obstruction.   Thanks to William Lafferty, I’ve learned that Mr. Gmelin “was a Cranford, New Jersey, based amateur photographer and maritime historian. He was one of the earliest members of the Steamship Historical Society of America and an occasional contributor to its journal, Steamboat Bill [now called Power Ships]. He died in 2001 at the age of eighty-eight.”  Click here and scroll for a photo of Mr. Gmelin, whose full name including the first name spelling I used above was stamped on the back of most of the photos.

Click here for SHSA’s online gallery.

I’ve a friend in the NJ town who pronounces her place of residence as if it started “H O B U . . . .”  The NJ city has a population density of 39,2012 people per square mile.  Many of them came down to the water in July 2014 for the City of Water Day, when I took these photos.

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Anyone know the vintage of this small yard tug?

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Many notable people are associated with Hoboken, but my association is with my parents, who both first set foot in the USA in Hoboken on the Holland-America pier, now long gone.

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As weird fate would have it, they traveled immediately to North Carolina, where their sponsor lived, which –as the seagulls fly–is about 30 miles from Hobucken, NC, where this USCG station is located.

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I don’t know if my parents ever visited Hobucken.  There’s the fish fleet just past the Route 304 bridge.

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I’d love to stop by the town someday soon.

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By the way, it has a population density of 25 people per square mile.

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Two Boys intrigued me, a 1966 44′ retired USCG boat.

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Anyone know if there’s a connection between the two place names?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

No, this isn’t the January River.  I leave for there today, but this . . .   !!  These next four fotos come from the perspicacious bowsprite, taken yesterday afternoon.   The tug in the foreground is Sea Wolf is 1982.  In the background is –of course–Ellis Island, 1900.  In between with the yellow stack is

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Yankee, 1907.  Her long history includes a stint as Machigonne moving passengers across the sixth boro from Ellis Island to other boros and to NJ.   The tow began at the far right of this foto.

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More tugster on Yankee when I return, but before then, I’m sure there’ll be other info.

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Six plus years ago, a friend Mike caught these fotos of Sea Wolf‘s sister–Sea Lion–moving an unusual vessel named Abora III out of the Morris Canal to sea.   The reed craft made it more than halfway across the Atlantic.

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All fotos by bowsprite.  Advance notice came thanks to Rod Smith, who once worked as deckhand on Yankee and who will have his own account of this move . . . to Brooklyn.  Here (2007) and here (2011) are my previous posts with Yankee fotos from New Jersey.  Click here to get some backstory–and video of Sea Wolf departing with ferry– from a supporter who wanted to keep them on the watery edge of Hoboken.

Now, I pack and head south myself.    Vou escrever mais em breve.

Let’s look at the boundaries of the sixth boro, using as reference two of the Holland Tunnel vent structures;  as you see in that link, we’ll call  New Jersey “land ventilation station” (to the left) and “river ventilation station” to the right.  I took this foto yesterday from the 18th floor of a building in Battery Park City.   I will re-take this when I find a higher platform.

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Here’s Seth’s foto from about 30 years ago, slightly higher and to the north.  Note the pier building then between the two ventilation stations.  Also notice the two angled piers and all the vacant land between there and the rail lines in Hoboken to the north.  I’m not sure of the name of the inlet between the “vacant” land and the railyards near the top of the foto.

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Here’s another shot I took yesterday showing the area between the river ventilation station and the building with the greenish roof, now called the Hoboken Yard and Terminal for New Jersey Transit.

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Here’s Seth’s foto from 30 years ago taken from near the land ventilator station looking north toward the Hoboken Yard and Terminal.

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If the changes in the sixth boro boundaries interest you, then the book to get is Thomas R. Flagg’s vol. 2 of New York Harbor Railroads in Color is the book to get.  Tom–a friend–took this foto in 1975 from the air.  In the lower left, notice the base of the river ventilation station.  Using that as reference and moving to the right (northward), you have a sense of what that space looked like before the building boom.

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From page 98 of Tom’s book, here’s the space in Jersey City south of the river ventilation station looking over to Manhattan.  The large pier to the left of the New York river ventilation station is Pier 40.

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And finally, from page 99 of Tom’s book,  taken from Manhattan in September 1967 by Allan Roberts, . . . possibly the World Trade Center, looking NW toward NJ, locate the two ventilation stations.  And  . ..  yes . . . that’s the SS United States.

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The waterfront . . .it has experienced a sea change from 30 years ago to now.  And stormy Sandy of seven months ago intimates that all this relatively rapid building on reclaimed land at sea level in the next 30 years could again experience a sea change.

Many thanks to Seth Tane and Thomas R. Flagg for use of their fotos.

Check out these additional fotos.  Orient yourself with the ventilation stations here.

Hoboken, 43′ loa, and never been anything but Hoboken living on Frank Sinatra Drive, launched 1963;

Meredith C. Reinauer, a pin boat since launch in 2002, 123′ loa;

Megan McAllister, ex-Arthur F. Zeman Jr., 77′ loa, launched 1985;

Penn No. 4, ex-Morania No. 4, 1973 and 120′ loa;

Penobscot, ex-Wm J. McPhillips, 99′ loa, launched 1959, and registered in Boothbay;

After bunkering Nowegian Dawn, here’s Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon C. Roehrig and Diane E. Roehrig, 89′ loa and 1964;

Paul T. Moran, 138′ loa and since 1975 dba Ocean Venture, S/R Golden State, Exxon Golden State, and Eliska;

and Java Sea, ex-Patriot, 1981 and 110′

and the oldest is . . .  Penobscot.  What?  I already said that?  Just back from self-assigned project weekend.  Details will follow.  Welcome back too–you know who yous are.

Photos, WVD.

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