You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Hackensack’ tag.

From Capt Nemo, a few years ago, the 2000 Mary Gellatly high and dry and before she was Mackenzie Rose.  Also, I see Tasman Sea, Dace, an unidentified Bouchard, and Yemitzis.

From KP, Dace getting her upper wheelhouse . . . over 10 years ago.

From a Great Lakes Mariner, the oldest working ship on the Lakes . . . Alpena, a survivor launched in 1942, as she backs out of a Wisconsin city.

From Tony Acabono, it’s Kodi, among the smallest, hard-workingest tugs of the sixth boro.

From Bob Stopper a few years back, when Grouper was facing another no-starter season.

Another one from Bob, it’s tug Syracuse with a comatose Governor Roosevelt alongside.

From back in March 2020, thanks to Jan Oosterboer, via Jan van der Doe, it’s the world’s largest vessel by displacement . . .  Pioneering SpiritHere are tech specs and lots of images from her operator, AllSeas.

Here she enters port without an assist. Jan writes:  “Moves complete oil rigs, drilling platforms, can work as pipe layer.
Has a working crew of about 400 people including sailing crew.”

If I read this correctly, she has eight 20-cylinder engines that generate 127,000 hp and can cruise at 14 kts!

 

And finally one of my own from almost 15 years ago, it’s tug Hackensack.  As I understand it she’s now in South America somewhere.

Thanks to Nemo, KP, Mariner, Acabono, Stopper, and the Jans . . .  for use of these photos.

I hope to “see” you tomorrow for my Turnstile Tours on zoom doing “Exploring the Erie Canal.”  Tomorrow’s tugster post will be up early so that you can get interesting info for the zoom meeting.

 

 

March 2009 . . . Stephen Scott here passes Port Ivory, near my old job, pushing RTC 70.   I’m still looking for Stephen Scott photo is her new profile, sans upper wheelhouse.  Port Ivory was an intriguing place name for me when I first moved here;  once a North Shore Branch of the SIRR even had a station there.

Kimberly Poling already had the color scheme, but adding a few more teal stripes to her current appearance is a big improvement.

Lettie passed by once while I scheduled my lunch break.  As of today’s posting, Lettie G is in Mobile AL!!  If she continues, she could end up back in Lake Erie by way of the great loop.  Is that what’s happening?  A few months I caught her at the top end of the Welland Canal here.

More Port Ivory area, Specialist was around, then called Specialist II.

So was the huge K-Sea fleet, which included Falcon.

This post should be called “sixth boro and beyond,” since I took this photo of Justine with RTC 120 up near Saugerties.  Back then,

was that a red canoe along her portside rail?

Side by side  in the Rondout 10 years ago were Hackensack, the 1953 colorful one, and Petersburg, 1954 vintage and still in the general area.  Last I knew, Hackensack was in Guyana pushing molasses barges.

And going  farther out, it’s Allie B pulling Goliath on a cargo barge Brooklyn Bridge out of Quincy MA, with assistance from Vincent D. Tibbetts Jr and Justice.

Here’s a closer up of Liberty.  For the entire reportage on that journey to Mangalia, Romania (!!), click here.  Damen operates the crane in their shipyard there, the largest shipyard in the Damen collection.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoy these looks back as much as I do.

The last one was seven, so … for number eight, I bring back this version of a foto from two years ago.  June K was the essential orange in the sixth boro;  nothing was more orange than June K, but

it’s 2010, not 2008, and it seems the answer is Punxsutawney Phil and Staten Island Chuck might say more than yes or no, and  “Yes a leopard can change its spots.”  And it’s year of the tiger and the tiger might

just strip off its stripes.

A blue June K!   And that’s in transition  to Sarah Ann.    I know it’s frivolous, but I liked the orange on this product of Amelia, Louisiana.

While I adjust to that, check out these fotos of  Hackensack (inland from Petersburg) in March 2009 and

in the same location–although imprisoned in ice–in January 2010.

Change is good.  viva transformation . . . although I’m still going to have a hard time feeling the same about a blue June K.

Blue June K fotos … many thanks to Jed.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

No . .  I’ve been tied up with spring cleaning . . . really.  But the blog needs to break out.  Here’s Davis Sea pushing up the Rondout past Petersburg and Hackensack.

And all the rest here from Paul Strubeck’s lens/flickr account, and all take between 60 and 110 miles north of the sixth boro.  Cheyenne,

North Sea and Lil Rip,

Taurus,

Margot,

and a government boat, Wire.

And as I post this, here downriver, it FEELS like a thaw, like a hint of spring in January.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck for these fotos.  Paul works on Cornell.

The google map below has two points marked;  all fotos above were taken between those points.

Imagine this post–in honor of April 1, ie, the start of the second month of the year (?…explanation later)–assembled like the films done on the streets, buildings, and parks in the land areas surrounding the sixth boro:  directors lead camera crews to gather countless short snippets, some a second or two long, into a reality with or without resemblance to the calendared and salaried world.  So here goes a movie, silent of course . . .

The trip up Rondout Creek began without incident; from the waterside we documented no flora or fauna but technologica like Gowanus Bay andaatugsgb

Spooky Boat facing down both Petersburg and Hackensack.  When we landed to foto from the shore, camera-bearing guardians

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surprised us as we attempted to decipher the decals,  thunderclouds, and underlying paint.  We fled

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and pursuit ensued.  (We need a chase scene.)

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When eventually cornered, we learned that we had misunderstood a reception intended to be friendly.  That led to an invite to visit Cornell

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and  smaller vessel that incorporated a novel steering system controlled by finger pointing that signaled  return to

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the mouth of the creek where the lighthouse stood

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and beyond which the fog shrouded in mystery;

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modern aids to navigation gave way to

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more primitive but equally effective ones, and time

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regressed, first by smaller increments and then

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with one long barbaric yawp, we found ourselves back almost 400 years or so, from where Henry will be channeling again soon.

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Hope you enjoyed the movie.  Happy April 1.  Top seven fotos by Bowsprite.  The rest, by Will Van Dorp.

The calendar . . . counting back using the names we still use like December (tenth), November (ninth),  October (eighth) and September (seventh)… we get to the Roman calendar with March as the first month.

I didn’t go to the Hudson to see the salvage effort today.  But here’s a link (NY Times) and another link (Peter Mello) to a story of a Massachusetts tug that assisted and a Flickr link, showing a K-Sea boat (McKinley Sea) and three Bouchard boats (Brendan and Evening Tide and ?).  Ron Rice shares the image below, taken this morning.  Thanks Ron.  According to the omnisicient bowsprite, DonJon Marine‘s cranes Columbia and Delaware Bay stand by on the scene with tugs Thomas Witte and Mary Alice.

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What follows is what I’d planned to post yesterday.

Below Hackensack heads out for the tugboat race in September 2006.  After the race, I didn’t see her again until spring 2008.  The “temporary tattoo” scheme stemmed from Portraits of Hope, also behind recent redecorations on NYC taxis.   Any guess on Hackensack’s appearance now?

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According to Hackensack‘s “myspace” page (now two years old), she’s female, single, Capricorn, vintage New Orleans 1953, and available to the highest bidder.  Is this still true?  Here’s what I saw spring 2008 in Kingston.

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For someone dating from 1953, she’s a looker.

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even close up during molt season.

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Anyone share  info on Hackensack?  Stories of her “peacockification,” as Bonnie phrased it here or more recent “de-peacockification” as I’ll dub it?

Unrelated . . . if you haven’t heard of Henry Hudson’s latest networking/socializing in Amsterdam, check it here.

Countdown begins. Five days left. As training perhaps, Cheyenne pushes gravel,

Joan Turecamo froths up the KVK,

Labrador Sea and Taurus diverge off Mariners Harbor (foto thanks to Jed),

Marie J McAllister, Pati R Moran, and the sweet Brandywine converse in Bayonne,

Might those above raft up at Pier 84 in five days as these did last year?

Might they churn up the Hudson as Urger and Hackensack did two years ago?

Unrelated update on a delivery–not of pizza—but of cranes. Below is Zhen Hua 10 in Port Elizabeth as of mid-day Tuesday, August 26.

Photos, WVD.

I’d never seen this unnamed yellow tug, eastbound on East River, before just over a week ago, unless the yellow covers some familiar red or green. Can anyone Identify it?

More that happened by . . . Yemitzis, 1954, out of Staten Island, up close and Maryland, 1962, also out of Staten Island farther off.

Harry McNeal, 1965, out of Perth Amboy, I don’t recall seeing before either . . .

Sea Wolf, 1982, New York, sibling of Sea Lion pictured here though you need to scroll past mermaids and serpents. (Oh, yes about 40 days away!!)

Vivian L. Roehrig, 1961, Glen Cove, NY, also ex-Peter M. and H. D. Campbell.

Jenny Anne, 1958, out of Hoboken, with an incomparable paint scheme and shifts in identity, ex-Buras Lady, Harbor Lights, John O Seahorse, Gaby Lynn Gisclair.

And nary a red or green or red & green in the lot. Let me end with a question also: what has become of Hackensack, pictured below at the 2006 NYC tugboat race? Don’t tell me it’s now red/green?

Photos, WVD.

Let’s travel through the Kills now, under the beautful Bayonne that graces my blog masthead, up the Hudson, and as far back as Labor Day 2006, a fantastic weekend for the best sporting eventing of the entire year, the annual Tug Races. Here’s where the fleetest roil the waters of the Hudson, an event that warranted an official delegate from the Mayor this year, but demands a whole lot more attention.

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Late morning more than a dozen tugs made their way to the starting line, an imaginary marker between the stern of Intrepid and Port Imperial in Weehawken.

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All helmsman wait for the signal of the VHF. When it comes,

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thousands of horsepower spin enormous propellors (which you’ll see in a future blogpost) and a placid Hudson is transformed.

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Anything smaller than the fleetest tug, K-Sea’s Lincoln Sea, and what is NOT smaller than Lincoln Sea, like Urger here, feels that small craft warning should have been posted. Who wins you might ask…

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Could there really be any question? Lincoln Sea, the K-Sea tug at 8000 hp, 123 feet LOA. Here is post-race festivities, Lincoln Sea takes on others in its class? It’s Janice Ann Reinauer, 2200 hp and 86 feet LOA.

Tell your friends and see you at the Labor Day 2007 premier sports event in– the world.

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