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. . . upon.  That’s what happened when I was just minding my own business the other day . . . and a voice calls my name and “Be careful.  I could have thrown you to the fishes,” he said, before showing this photo below.

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Getting USNS Red Cloud,  Helen Laraway, Andrea, and Sea Wolf into a single frame had been my aim just seconds before.

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No matter.  Here goes Lucy Reinauer pushing RTC 83.

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I think Stephen-Scott was headed for a barge out beyond Gulf Service with GM11103.

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What I found was Bluefin and

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Morgan Reinauer and

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Amberjack and

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Scott Turecamo with barge New Hampshire.  And more.

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And maybe getting kept upon and thrown to the fishes . . . might just work out alright, although watch out for shadowy characters like the lurker over there.

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It made me think about a day a mere 100 or so days from now when photographers photographing get photographed themselves.

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Happy leap day.

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Here’s what I put up last leap year.

All photographs here–except the obvious two–by Will Van Dorp.

 

So what happens in the rest of the sixth boro during Fleet Week?  Works goes on.  Ellen goes past the Statue to the next job, possibly to move USCGC Eagle out.

As is McKinley Sea, with its Kirby livery.

Terrapin Island continues its 24/7 sand moving.

Tankers transfer fluids and container vessels come and go.

Susquehanna follows Quantico Creek to the east.

Holiday jetskiers race off bow waves, abandoning prudence and caution.

Gulf Service awaits an appointment at the tanks.

Ice-bowed Ice Hawk, newly painted and

maybe newly-named, awaits its call.

And (in town for OpSail, Bay City, Michigan registered Appledore V, enjoys the late Monday sun and breeze.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated from Lake Michigan:  1907 SS Keewatin moves.

This could be called “How to identify a tug:  start by recognizing fleets.”  Long neck and short stack . .  or vice versa.  Bound for  the North River are McAllister Responder with tall ringed stack and Norwegian Sea with tall orange-tipped house and mustard stack.

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The height of wheelhouse matters not:  tall orange-and-black house here–along with the black stack–makes it a Hornbeck, and this case, it’s Gulf Service.

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Short red-and-white ringed stack–it’s Ellen McAllister.  And the baby-blue stack with DT on it is Dann Ocean Towing’s Comet.  By the way, I haven’t seen Dann’s Allie B since her departure for Rumania late last winter.  Anyone spot Allie B?

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Black stack with a bold M . .  it’s Moran.  In this case, it’s Miriam Moran, out to rustle up a ship.

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In this case, the mustard stacks identify this vessel as a K-Sea . . . .it’s Falcon, with her low stern.

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The stack color on Reinauer boats has much the same mustard color–at least in this light–but the addition of the diamond and the red . . . is unmistakeable.  In this case, it’s Christian Reinauer.

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Most prominent feature of this vessel–foto taken in the drizzle yesterday–is not the stack at all, but the color and superstructure shape. Anyone know?

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It’s Cheyenne –or Crow–of course.  In this case Cheyenne.  Close up of Cheyenne‘s stack soon.

Last one . . . has no stack at all and I’ve run it before.  It’s a mystery ship taken by bowsprite about a month ago and we’d love to get an identification.  Help?  Foto was taken from Lower Manhattan looking toward Jersey City;  vessel headed upriver.  Aliens . . . discovering the river, perhaps?

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All fotos except the mystery ship by Will Van Dorp.

My sentiments of more than two years ago amuse me here, and “full frontal” isn’t even really.  So in connection with a project I’m considering, here’s really  fully frontally.  Let’s start with HNLMS Tromp.  Now in those twin radomes, I see teddy bear’s ears.

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BNS Lobelia is harder to read.

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Of all the vessels in the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 1 (SNMCMG1), the most unusual was HNoMS Rauma.  Ever-reliable Jed sends these links here and here on vessel and hull design  Although Rauma traversed the Atlantic with the rest of the group, she seems marginally seaworthy.  But what do I know?    For all the SNMCMG1 vessels, visit Bowsprite.

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Peacemaker .  . spider be-webbed?

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Crow, (1963, Brooklyn, NY!) as seen at the bulkhead in Waterford last Saturday.

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Evening Mist, (1976, Houma, LA), big square house.

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Gulf Service, 1979, Amelia, LA) taller, hourglass houses.

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And this circles us back to Tromp, here following the egg-shaped Onrust, (2009, Rotterdam Junction, NY), featured many times on this blog.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves soon for Kingston for . . .

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“Kingston Waterfront on the weekend of September 19-20. From noon to 6 p.m. both days, the WOW (Working on Water) event includes a tugboat bootcamp, trolley rides, lighthouse tours, sea shanty singers and more including “wandering tug geezers” and a “Working Hudson Picture Show.” The event is funded by the Ulster County Quadricentennial Commission, NYS assemblymember Kevin Cahill, the City of Kingston Quadricentennial Committee, and the Historic Kingston Waterfront Revival (Robert Iannucci and Sonia Ewers). For more information, check out the website here [www.workingonwater.org]. Meanwhile, from noon to 7 p.m. on September 19 at Cornell Park, which is located on Wurts Street, there’s a free outdoor drum music festival. Jack Dejohnette, the famed jazz drummer who played with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, and Jerry Marotta, who has played with Peter Gabriel and the Indigo Girls, among others, are scheduled to perform”  as quoted from   the http://www.ci.kingston.ny.us/

“Working Hudson Picture Show . .. ”  OOps!  That’s me.  Gotta run.  I’ll be at the Picture Show collecting ghost stories.  If you got one, tell it to my video camera, please?

Imagine being in rough seas in the upper wheelhouse of Wicomico,

or Gulf Service, or

Volunteer.  Air draft of Volunteer is 114 feet.

114 feet! See the two crew standing on the afterdeck below.

So here’s some figuring to take years of rust off my math brain: let’s assume the upper pilothouse is 100 feet from the water, and in rough waters, the vessel pitches and/or rolls 20 degrees. How many feet from top center would a crewman in the house travel with each 20 degree pitch or roll? Answer tomorrow . . . as it may take me that long to do the math.

Photos, WVD.

Disclosure: I’ve never claimed to be in the tug industry although I’ve often considered trading in my profession to start a new life as a deckhand and go up the chain. Too bad life is so short or I’d do it. There is a precedent: in 1986, I resigned from a college teaching position to learn to drive semi, and I ended up a few weeks later hired to teach student drivers the intricacies of double clutching and backing. Anyhow, I’m dredging up this ancient history to make a point: namely, tugs excite me. They have power and style. Politicians and CEOs, who are reputed to have a power and style, do not excite me in the same way. Check out Hornbeck‘s incomparable Patriot Service below, one of my favorite recent fotos.

 

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Or in their fleet check out Gulf Service

 

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or Stapleton Service escorting Calusa Coast . . .

 

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or Sea Service.

 

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Style and power! Nowhere could those qualities better be witnessed. To you all in the industry, my hat’s off. That’s why I fotograf and blog. Had I been born on Staten Island rather than farm country, I might be at the helm. Other fleets soon.

Photos, Will Van Dorp.

Note: Check out gowanus lounge update first.

Now imagine a charming pinkie schooner and its hospitable master, a maritime educator, and two bloggers (but of course they each have multiple other identities). Now mix them with the sixth borough and a uniquely seasonal January day. Give them a destination, and here’s the result:

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Add in an ebb tide. Raise all the sail including the fisherman, and pass an ATB (articulated tug barge) whose crew admire as we ride the ebb and wind outbound.
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Throw in a flurry of traffic including some tankers, a car carrier, a container ship of course, some small fishing boats. And tell the helmsman, albehe a slacker with hand in pocket, to tack across shipping lanes.

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Alternate she on the tiller periodically as we race across Raritan Bay, leaving West Bank light and a pilot boat in the looming.

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Daylight wanes as we approach ultima Staten Islandus. Loons ululate a greeting (or something) as we sail into the approaches of Tottenville.
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Destination reached. Temperature’s dropping. Must be time for some glog.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, except the one of me.

 

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