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Let’s go back to September 2009.  CMA CGM Marlin, launched 2007,  was the standard size back then . . .  The 5092-teu vessel has since been scrapped, after only nine years of service!!

Over a dozen sailing barges came to NYC to sail in New York waters in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon arriving here all those years ago.  Here are more posts from back then. Groenevecht, below, is a 2000-built replica of a lemsteraak.

Also in town to celebrate were Onrust and HNLMS Tromp. Here’s more on Tromp.

Old and new came.  On one end of the spectrum was Day Peck, 

her great hold still waiting to be transformed into museum.

Urger still operated, here sidling up to Lehigh Valley 79.

A different Rosemary McAllister worked here.

Irish Sea (1969) was still at work.

Yessir, stuff changes.  All photos in September 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m praying for perfect light on Sunday afternoon when a public viewing of the barges is scheduled on Governors Island.  PortSide NewYork offers this downloadable guide to the barges, Red Hook, and its Dutch history here.  If you have a chance to get there, the details of these vessels will reward you.  For this month from an on-barge perspective, check out the blog maintained by Arjen Wapenaar, captain of Sterre, the 1887 tjalk;  although the text is in Dutch, the pics are great.

I’ve always been taken by leeboards (aka zwaarden), but I’ve developed a new interest in the rudders:  large and exuberant.  And it seems the Dutch themselves love the rudders, transforming a component that could be just functional to  Rudders with a passion for  . . . being rudders.  Notice the size the rudder (aka roer) on the 1888 tjalk Vrouwe Cornelia (Lady Cornelia).

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And the decoration, which I offer to the readers over at Neversealand.

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The rudder on Lemsteraak Sydsulver includes a boarding ladder and a flag bracket.

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The rudder on Groenevecht dwarfs the tillerman.

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And all that beautiful wood begs for paint and carving tools.

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I’d like to know the various types of wood used in these rudders, like this dark wood on Groenling (green finch).

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I’m looking forward to the viewing on Sunday not only for more rudders but also other details:  mast, rigging, houses, blocks, bowsprits, etc.  Check out the boom (giek) support on Windroos, the hoogaars.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Off to Waterford now.

Let’s follow one aak from Flinterduin to the East River.  GroeneVecht, built in 1999, hangs in the slings.

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Notice the hull lines.  Dimensions are roughly 60′ by 20′.  Groene means green, and Vecht is the name of a river in Netherlands.

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I am fixated on leeboards, you may have noticed before.

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Once out of the slings,Groenevecht motoors into a basin for minor up rig and then a wait with

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earlier barges offloaded.

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Once the flag is secured to the rudder,

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she motors past Flinterduin to savor the East River

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Much more later.  All fotos by will Van Dorp.

Access thanks to Carter Craft and GMD Shipyard.  Thanks.

Remember to double click to see full size fotos.

 

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