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I’ll reprise some of these vessels in later posts, but this traffic we passed or followed unbound from Quebec City.

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Umiavut serves the Canadian Arctic.

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Ocean Traverse Nord has been featured in earlier posts.  Here she’s at capacity with dredge spoils from Lac St. Pierre and off to the release site.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’m not adding much text in the next few posts.  Why gild the lily or rouge the autumn maple leaf.  When I’m back in the sixth boro, I’ll revisit some of these photos.   For now enjoy Quebec.

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This is Montmorency Falls.

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Amundsen will be breaking ice soon.  Winter is coming.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

By the time you read this, I should already be in Quebec, and once we get under way, we’ll reverse the trip I began six weeks ago in NYC’s sixth boro here. From Quebec City we travel up the Saint Lawrence, up as in upstream.  The waterway is truly beautiful, and although I have defined tasks on the ship, I get to spend a lot of time watching .

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The photo below I took from the NE corner of Lake Ontario looking toward the port of Oswego.

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From the Lake, we cut in at Oswego via the Canal, bypass all the fishing, and

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make our way via the grand canal back to saltwater.

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Here’s the 1899 Buffalo-built steam tug Geo E. Lattimer (loa 59′ x 16′ x 4.5′) exiting the low side of Lock 17.

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Given the pain of finding enough of a signal to post, I can’t tell you when and what you’ll see next.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, including the photos of photos from Canal signage.

Note:  All these photos were taken on September 8–four days ago–after we had reached the northernmost stop on the journey and were returning to Montreal, where I stepped off for a spell.

Six years ago I did two posts ( here and here) about Canadian newsprint transporters that arrived in the sixth boro’s Hackensack River via the Lake Champlain and the associated canals.  A huge paper mill once stood here at the riverside where this spanking new amphitheater aka Amphithéâtre Cogeco–now stands.

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Dawn comes sometimes and there’s no sun, only mist and rain like this.   But that light lends itself to looking at other things like water flow around a bow like the one of  Algoma Guardian,  now north bound on Lake Huron.

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Floretgracht‘s very different bow attacks the flow differently.  Floretgracht is now in Hamilton.

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Sichem Dubai was at the Trois Rivieres dock, but now is Louisiana bound. That dock is part of an existing paper mill.

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Not sure what I’m looking at here.

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Then the rain came on harder.

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Garganey is the same vessel as in the photo here (scroll) escorted into a Quebec City dock by two Ocean tugs.   She’s now in Toronto.

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The last leg on this trip will be the focus tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve made myself back to the sixth boro by train now, and I’m succumbing to “train lag,” which means I’m allowing myself a few days to put up chronologically arranged photos before focusing on some scene that caught me and haven’t let go.  The Quebec City-Levis ferries are part of a huge network.

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The Coast Guard base is just below–way below–Château Frontenac, where a fateful conference took place in 1943.

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An excursion boat has as namesake a Quebecois–same guy the extra ‘l’ notwithstanding– who undertook a significant journey with a priest.

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Ocean has a huge base in the old port.  I plan a host of Ocean posts soon.

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I don’t know if Nordik Express still makes this journey, but I intend to find out.

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Django dates from 1928, but more than that, I know nothing.

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And finally, back from a job, Ocean Henry Bain returns from a job, passing the pilots’ station.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls this morning as a day that lives in infamy.  In remembrance, check out the first photo here.

or Go North . . . or up and then down bound.It’s all better than going south ….

Anyhow, in the spirit of the first of series from earlier this past months’ peregrinations, I’ll start with the map.  The red pushpins are overnights and the yellows are shorter stops.  An unexpected jaunt will be from Ogdensburg to Quebec City without stopping at Trois Rivieres or Montreal, where we stop after Quebec City.

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Locks there’ll be plenty–37 total I believe–because the alternative is shown below. You can descend the Lachine Rapids, but in a different type of boat.   Lachine . . . that’s French for what it looks like in English . . . China, as in … the folks like Cartier thought that if only they could get past the rapids, they’d be in China.

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Here’s another way to look at the St Lawrence watershed, care of an USACE diagram.

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Here’s to hoping you read this and to my having wifi.

By the way, I was shocked when I learned the namesake of the St Lawrence, patron saint of the BBQ.  Sizzlicious!!

Some of you may remember the January River, or JR, posts I did three years ago in July.  I went to Brasil because my daughter was there, and she’s a fluent Portuguese speaker.   I had a great time, swam in several places, and never got sick.  I’m putting some photos never posted here up today because I know there are sewage issues there in the huge bay called Guanabara, but let’s not make a poopmageddon out of it, as the meteorologists do with the snowmegeddons in winter up here.   Excuse my Portuguese, but merda sells news, always will.

I took this photo looking west from Arpoador toward Ipanema Beach.

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Here’s a shot from the same point looking toward Copacabana.

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Here’s a shot of Copacabana looking toward the Bay, with Sugar Loaf as the prominent feature along the ridge.  A fair number of people were in the water despite the heavy surf.

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I chartered this boat and –all tallied– chugged around Bay for about six hours.

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Of course, I was looking who was there, like Galliano, LA’s  C-Enforcer,

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CNL Ametista from Santos,

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Rio’s own TS Abusado and TS Soberano,

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Seabulk Brasil,

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a pilotboat and tug Atlantico standing off near Hai Yang Shi You,

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CPO Copacabana, and many,

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many more.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders where these vessels are today.

Here are the previous posts.

The 1980 Innisfree works the Chicago River, but it has New England roots.

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The rest of the boats in this post work in the waters around Mackinac Island.  Anna May is Wisconsin-built, 1947.

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Felicity is a Shepler’s Ferry boats.  For a history of the business, click here.

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Straits of Mackinac II is a 1969 Blount product. The Arnold family has been in the ferry business here since 1878.

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LaSalle dates from 1983.

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Huron is Erie PA built, 1955, and the oldest vessel working for the Arnold fleet.

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Joliet dates from 1993.   For many more Michigan ferries, click here.

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And to close out today, we’re back at Innisfree, maybe named for the W. B. Yeats poem.   Here Innisfree passes the footprint-gone-wild for the now-dead Spire project.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Tugster has been a work in progress, evolving organically, without a foreseen plan.  So I just noticed that although I’ve done many posts on autumn sail, I’ve not used the summer sail title.  Until now.

What better place to start than with SSV Oliver Hazard Perry.  GCaptain calls it a 21st century ship mindful of its historic roots.  It heads to Boston this weekend to pick up its first crew!   I caught the photo here back on June 27, but the prescient bowsprite caught it passing through the sixth boro here over seven years ago.

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Also, in late June near 79th Street, I caught schooner Columbia, another 21st century sailing vessel with vintage lines a la Burgess.

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Sloop Woodie Guthrie is currently undergoing a makeover in Kingston.  You can donate to help here.

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I believe this is OMF Ontario, on the hard over in Lysander, NY. In the background that’s an unidentified tender 1937 tender Dana II (Thx, JD) and  Reliable, the sad (engineless) twin of Syracuse. See more of Reliable and Syracuse here.

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Anyone know why OMF Ontario is still on the hard?  Launched in 1994 at the site of the former Goble yard in Oswego, It purports to be the first Oswego-built schooner since 1879!   I’d love to learn more.

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Here’s OMF Ontario rigged and at the dock in August 2013.

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Here’s Steelwinds, a wind turbine cluster built on part of a former Bethlehem Steel plant south of Buffalo and designed to take advantage of the fetch created by the prevailing SWerlies.

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Here’s 1992 built Spirit of Buffalo.  Does anyone have photos of her transiting through the sixth boro, the Hudson, and Erie Canal back in May 2009?

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Here’s another 21st century sailing ship, also with vintage roots that go back way further than the 19th century, and a close up

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of her figure head.  Click here for a good starting point of this vessel’s construction.

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And finally, here’s Inland Seas, anchored near the Straits of Mackinac.   For more on the ship project and its late founder, click here.

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp, who is back in the sixth boro but unpacking from the Go West trip and planning a Go North trip .

Let’s start with one that I can’t identify, other than by its name . . . Charlie E, I believe.  I took this photo in Port Colborne.

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I was wrong when I thought McKeil’s Sharon M I was an ex-Candies tug like Na Hoku or Greenland Sea.  It turns out she was built in Japan.

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I can’t ever remember seeing a heaping load of coal like this . . .

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Petite Forte was docked also along the Welland Canal with barge St. Mary’s Cement.

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I’ll put up a pilot boat post soon.  Meanwhile, can you identify this pilot boat?

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Jaclyn is a 41′ tug built in 1967.

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Joncaire, it turns out, is an important name in Niagara history.

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Eagle is a 57′ tugboat built in 1943 and operating out of Cleveland. Here she heads for the outer harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is unpacking as quickly as possible, and preparing to repack soon.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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