You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘gallivant’ tag.

Here are the previous three installments of this title.  After seven straight weeks away, I’m back in the boro for a while, a short while, and it seems the best way to catch up–attempt to–is to work backwards, starting from now.

A welcome sight on the west side of midtown . . . . Chandra B, ensconced here in the marine guard.  A great name for an organization?

Nearby, Miss Circle Line stands at the ready.

Still earlier this morning, I caught St. Andrews, 

and before that Frances.  More of her as I work backwards in time.

Earliest of all today . . .  Helen Laraway.

 

One from our arrival yesterday . . .  it’s Thunder Bay, an icebreaker assigned to summertime and UN Week duties.  As the name of a Lake Superior port, this name goes with lakers as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels a bit like Rip Van Winkle this morning.   Maybe I should gallivant a bit in the sixth boro . . .

 

It’s another day of mostly but not entirely pics.

See the tags for names.

Nunalik began life in 2009 as Beluga Fairy.  I love these names.

Nunalik is one of the NEAS fleet serving Canada’s north country.  It is Inuit owned.

Therefore, it’s name is written in Inuktitut.

Sedna is also a name associated with the north.

 

 

 

The port of Salaberry-de-Valleyfield has a lot of Arctic-destined products.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has wifi only when he has wifi.

 

 

Let’s record some of the ships along the same stretch as yesterday’s post did for tug boats, and the names are in the tags.

Nordic Barents was discharging iron ore for the Contrecoeur, although I don’t know the provenance of the ore.

 

The oil port is certainly concentrated.

 

 

 

I took Happy Buccaneer to be an almost new vessel . . . little would I have thought it was built in 1984!!

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Mostly photos, and all taken between Quebec City and Montreal.  Ocean Charlie is a great name.

Ocean Henry Bain moves a barge, possibly from a passenger terminal.

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Ocean Intrepide hangs at East Montreal.

But here in the South Shore Canal . . . the outlier . . .

 

Mary E. Hannah is way from out of the area.

 

And finally . . . in Valleyfield, it’s Cercle Polaire of GFFM.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who posts when possible these days.

 

Ferries cross the entrance to the Saguenay River, a truly magical place.  Do visit if you can.

Weather appears to vary with turns around capes on the river.

Farms even stitch themselves into the valleys.

Rain intensifies beyond each point until

 

just when you think it’ll snow, sunny slopes appear.

We wind past islands  . . .

and follow those who play in the breezes channeled by geology.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Again . . . on the run, chasing food like the finned one in the foreground, Federal Asahi heads down bound chasing who knows what.

Maria exits the Saguenay River where she discharged a load of bauxite.

 

 

And Insignia, later to be speeding downriver at 21 kts, overtakes us at the last bridges down bound spanning the River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

In the narrow channel of the SLSW leading between Lake Ontario and Montreal, you can see salties and lakers fairly close up, as you can in the St. Clair area.

Enjoy these.

A bright day with fluffy but unsettled clouds enhances photos.

 

Most of these boats I’ve seen before, as you can trace by clicking on the tags.

Flevoborg is an exception, as

is Miena Desgagnes, a cargo vessel whose destination can be seen

by its cargo . . .

See the HardRok sign on the truck door?

Ditto this one . . .

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will compose another batch of posts when next I have wifi.

Unrelated, who goes deepest?

It’s time to start a new series . . . with BBC Leda.

Will cargoes of wind turbine parts ever stop?  What will replace them as the next big thing?

This winter–or when I stay in place for a while–I might figure out how many of these Trillium class CSL boats I’ve seen.

 

I’ve never seen this many ships at the Prescott elevators.

Amstelborg, BBC Switzerland, and Federal Clyde were all there at once.

 

 

Algoscotia was upbound, as

was Canadian Empress.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Enjoy three views of Ocean Echo II with different contexts:  the Iroquois Dam,

a scenic late summer meadow, and

the Iroquois lock itself.  Click here for pics dating from the dam and lock construction.

A  lot of Ocean Group tugs are included here, but Ocean Cormoran is not . . .

Although blue-hulled, VM/S St. Lambert was built for the SLSMC.

 

Ocean Macareux is a product of GFFM LeClerc, which I visited a few months back, and was on the wall in the old port of Montreal.

And last but not least, Denis M is a 1942 product of Russel Brothers.  Here she is on the wall just below Habitat 67.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s digression time . . . now that I’ve not done one of these in a while.

You can’t not see the pattern here . . .

Steam Whistle is an interesting story with a beer connection, you might say.

I’m posting fast, along the river, so I’m not taking time to identify these vehicles, although if you want to know how the pattern continues here, see what this blog reveals, a post that concludes with a photo of the same truck.

 

Continuing east and downstream, there’s this beauty . . .

in Kingston, and sure enough the pattern prevails . . . all

Ontario alcohol-related trucks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s “on the boat again.”.

 

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