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Really random means photos from widely separated places by different people.  So here goes . . . the first two from Jed, who took them in the former Dutch Antilles about a year ago.  Triton is home-ported in Ijmuiden, another must-see place in the Netherlands if you’re interested in workboats. Click here for some posts I did about Ijmuiden, the mouth of the waterway out to sea from Amsterdam. Click here for a photo of Triton I took a few years back in Ijmuiden.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Andicuri, named for a beach which itself is named for an Arawak chief,  was built just south of Rotterdam in 1983.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Until about a year ago, Sand Master worked out of the sixth boro mining sand;  recently it was sold to interests and was spotted–not photographed–in Surinam.

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photo date January 2012 by Will Van Dorp

Here’s a strange photo taken in April 2012 by Don Rittner, and part of a post called “Jets Along the Mohawk.”  Maybe I should have called it “early Cold War jets up the Flight of Five.”

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And finally, here’s a photo I took in Beaufort NC in June 2013, Fort Macon tied up near the phosphate dock.

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I hope you enjoyed these bounces within the northern half of the American hemisphere.

 

This post is a direct follow-up to one I did a week ago, documenting the 270-nm trip from Kings Point NY to Norfolk aboard USMMA Sailing Foundation vessel Tortuga.  This post documents the second and final leg of the trip to Tortuga‘s winter berth in New Bern NC, a 179-nm trip from Norfolk.

Let’s start here.  Departure time on day 1 is 1100 h. If you think the navy vessel in dry dock looks familiar, well . . . it visited the sixth boro in May 2012, and I toured the ship DDG 57 USS Mitscher at that time here.

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A USN presence is pervasive along the Elizabeth river portion of the ICW, but the Norfolk Naval Ship is

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technically in Portsmouth. The vessel above is AS 41 USS McKee

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Click here and here for info on the Elizabeth River, technically a tidal estuary.  Click on the map below to get interactivity.

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Here McLean Contracting Co. tug Fort Macon works on the replacement of the Steel Bridge in Chesapeake VA.

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I was surprised to learn there’s a lock in the ICW, the Great Bridge Lock.  I was even more surprised to learn the USACE contracts the operation and maintenance of the lock to a company called US Facilities.

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I must read more about the ICW, but in WW2 it proved a safe route for commerce when enemy submarines preyed on vessels offshore.

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Paradise Creek pushes oil along the ICW today; when I started this blog,  it was a regular workhorse in the sixth boro of NYC.

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The color of ICW water is determined by natural tannins.

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The ICW is composed of wide open bays and sounds–which have narrow channels-as well as narrow cuts.   Here Evelyn Doris of the ICM fleet pushes a covered barge–soybeans, I’ll wager–northbound, possibly to Norfolk.

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Ahead is the US Rte 64 Bridge over the Alligator River, a swing bridge.

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Note the proximity of the photo above to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tannins in the Alligator River water create this color.

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North Carolina today protects a lot of its coastal wetlands. Hunting is permitted, and in fact, VHF radio picked up a lot of communication with folks hunting in there.

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Parts of the ICW flow through cuts like the Alligator-Pungo Canal.

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This moment of arrival in Belhaven meant a lot to me, because just around the point in the center of the photo is the hospital where I was born. I hadn’t known it, but Belhaven also considers itself the birthplace of the ICW.

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Departure time on day 3 was 0600, Jupiter and Venus were higher in the sky than the rising sun.

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Aurora Mine looms over the Pamlico river. Potash export happens through Beaufort,  documented on tugster here and here a few years back.

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See the mine area on the south side of the Pamlico River below.

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Hunting abounds here.

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Note the spelling. 

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Belhaven used to support a fishing fleet.  I’ve no idea how the size of the fleet and market in Hobucken has fluctuated over the years.

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Day 3, early afternoon we depart the Neuse River for the Trent by passing through the Cunningham Drawbridge.

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Tortuga is docked here for winter.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Again many thanks to the USMMA Sailing Foundation for inviting me to crew in winter relocation for Tortuga.

Inside Beaufort Inlet is quite the archipelago, the largest island of which is Radio Island.  Let’s start from Front Street in Beaufort and circle.  Wild horses are there,

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as well as really minimal truckable tugs.

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And a fishing fleet in port includes Jessica, Jonathan Ryan and

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Colton Scott and Miss Sandy V.

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Note the means to keep the fish deck free of fumes.

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Over on the Morehead City side, prominent are to phosphate storage domes.  I presume Beaufort Belle pushes the barges from the mine in Aurora to here.  Anyone know how large the Potash corp fleet is.

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On the oceanside of the Route 70 bridge, the Moran ship-assist fleet parks between jobs.

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Fort Macon, Fort Fisher, and Grace Moran.

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Salamina1 loads phosphate.

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Jack Holland prepares to move a barge of scrap aluminum bales.

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They arrived on this vessel . . .

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Sea Baisi.

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Robert Burton does the same.  I’m not sure where these bales will be converted into aluminum products.

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Over behind Fort Macon, WLB 204 Elm is docked, more or less

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across the chanel from the landing zone on Radio Island.  That’s Na Hoku in the background.

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Parting shots include this outbound fishing vessel and

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an idea about alternative housing . .  if you visit.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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