You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘fog’ tag.

Who knew so many types of fog exist?  I believe this is advection fog, and it’s patchy, forming only in places where warm air lays over cold moist areas, like ocean water in May, a common occurrence in the Upper Bay in springtime.

0849 hours:  I watched this ship come through the Narrows.  Around that hour, traffic was intense.  At one point less than half an hour earlier, I feared two MSC container ships were going to collide, but it was only my eyes playing tricks on me, with limited visibility.

0852  That’s Oleander overtaking the bulk carrier.

0852.23   At this point, I decided to see what conditions existed on the other side of the island.

0949  And here we are, less than an hour later.

0952  Jumeirah Beach is a white sandy waterfront area in Dubai.  I chuckled when the VTS folks announced her a “jeremiah beach,”  recalling when Hammurabi was announced as “ham berry.”

0955  No hint of fog existed here, about five miles away.

1000

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has lots more foggy and not-so-foggy photos to post.

Click here for the Pacific Basin homepage.

 

Fog . . . it’s fickle, patchy, and blinding.  Even with radar, I imagine it causes stress.  Count the tugboats below.  Follow the lights and you get two:  Patapsco and Wicomico from right to left.  Easter morning 645 am at IMTT.

Same place, 745.  I think the vessel is Maryland.

Same location.  800 am.  Meagan Ann, whom you saw here in snow now just barely a month ago.  Fog forms in warm land air (75 Sunday) over cold water.

Patapsco over by LaFarge silos (now fog-shortened) near Hess Bayonne, as seen from IMTT.  830 am.  Note:  Hess Bayonne is less than a mile to the east of IMTT, where earlier fotos were taken.

Eastbound Ivory Coast at IMTT.  900 am.

Westbound Ivory Coast, near Hess Bayonne, at 930 am, half an hour later than the previous shot.

Eastbound Stephen Scott, near Hess Bayonne, around 940.

A minute later, as vessel approaches the St George ferry terminal.

Westbound  tanker Ionian Wave, escorted by Brendan Turecamo just before 1000.  Note the Monitor-like appearance of the Staten Island ferry.

About 1001, Ionian Wave and Brendan Turecamo emerge from a fog bank.  Normally, the Manhattan skyline would be visible.

All fotos Easter Sunday morning by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  Mitch of Newtown Pentacle has been checking out the sixth boro these days and doing nice work.

Also related:  NYTimes article on the new FDNY fireboat, arriving . . . . soon.

Unrelated:  Shen Neng 1 in the Great Barrier Reef.

Just over 30 days left.  When it gets too foggy,

it helps top use a tool like factcheck.org

or distortion, illusion, misrepresentation, and immovable danger awaits ahead.

 All fotos, Will Van Dorp

 

Roughly 150,000 mornings ago, Henry Hudson sailed into what is now New York harbor. I hereby propose that we scrap Columbus Day-since Cristoforo never deemed this geography worthy of a reconnoiter– and, instead, celebrate a newly-declared Hudson Day. Our politicians could make us happy that way.

 

hm3.jpg

 

This morning this Half Moon replica raised its anchor off Bay Ridge Flats and sailed northward. The haze lent the ship a ghostly suggestion. Might that really be Captain Hudson voyaging upriver in a time fissure removing him from his era by 150,000 days? What notation would he have written in the log as the Staten Island ferry breezed southward here?

 

hm4.jpg

 

Would he have sworn off any hard drink or tobacco after seeing the Queen Mary 2 make for the Narrows, as we can recognize off the port bow?

 

hm21.jpg

 

What fearful conjecture might he have toyed with to account for this large structure in today’s Hoboken? And what might he conclude about the natives in the red sailing craft?

 

hm.jpg

 

What terror would have gripped the Captain and crew as they studied the monumental artifacts of a civilization off to his right? Did he contemplate turning back south and fleeing for the safety of the high seas southeast of the Narrows? Ahoy, Henry, time traveler! We might be friendly.

Images by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,368 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

June 2020
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930