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Three and a half years ago I started this series.  I realize now I should just have called the three posts for the ports in question:  Guaymas in Sonora, Manzanillo in Colima, and Lázaro Cárdenas in Michoacán.  Having started the way I did, the Ensenada post will then just follow the pattern.  With half a million people, Ensenada is the third largest city in Baja California.  Besides being the starting/ending point for the Baja 500 and 1000 races, it’s also an important fishing port, although less so than it was prior to the US tuna ban.   I have enough pics for a second post on Ensenada, so I’ll call this the fish and road version, with another to follow.

I took this photo from the road. Down there but out of sight at that moment were tuna pens.

Translate whatever you want on this menu.  I can vouch for the marlin ahumado, smoked marlin soup!  The $45.00 Mexican converts to about $2.25 US, and it was realmente delicioso!

Southern Horizon is inside the port tied up to a floating drydock. 

Galileo is too common a vessel name to locate.

 

 

From my conveyances, I was witness to the arid and steep terrain.

Other fishing machines lounged on the moorings.

This is the rocky shoreline south of Rosarito.

A few days later, I got lots of photos through a bug-spattered windshield.

 

 

All photos, WVD, who is back in the sixth boro, behind in work, but for now successful in reclaiming the reins from the robots.  I hope you enjoyed their tenure.  They will be back for an extended period in June.

Sometimes the photos can speak for themselves….

Needless to say, local fishermen and women brave dangers to get out to where the fish are plentiful.

Snags are quite plentiful also.

All manner of boats go in pursuit.

 

Humans are not the only fishers out there . . .

Some have a minimal gear approach…

 

 

 

And what’s a nearby ULCV when there are fish to be had . . .

You should have seen the bunker I had on the line recently . . .

 

 

 

All photos, except the two of me by bowsprite as I was cranking in a silver landbass, WVD.

Unlike birds, which inhabit the atmosphere as we do, fish aren’t seen very clearly unless you pull them out of their medium.  Recently I enjoyed watching Gotham Fish Tales, on youtube, an hour and 15 well spent.

Although the sixth boro may see its first snowfall today, it’s not winter for over a month yet.  Winter fishing, though, has seen lots of posts on this blog.  But here’s a focus on something new for me.  See the fishing machine in the photo below?

Here’s a closer up, a set of photos I took a month ago.  I’ll call it a hands-free kayak.

Nearby and maybe chasing the same school of fish was another.

And they’re geared out:  high-visibility flag, beach trolley wheels, outrigger, spare paddle, rod holders, landing net . . . and likely electronics. .  .

Has anyone reading this tried out a “hands-free” kayak?

Just the other day I saw so many hands-free fishing kayaks that at first I thought it was a tour, but these fisherfolk seem just follow following the fish, as the folks in the motorboats are.

 

I didn’t see anyone land a fish, but I wonder how much pull a large fish could apply to the kayak.

Below a a view out to sea, with a southbound Tammo and core sampling Seacor Supporter.

I have an ulterior motive in posting this: I’m considering a long kayak trip and wonder if for long trips a pedal kayak would be more efficient than a conventional one.  Can you really pedal for an hour and then switch and paddle, moving for longer periods  of time by alternating the part of the body at work?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who bought his first kayak back in 1987.

Any guesses about the location on the far shore with the spiky masts?

The water is Hampton Roads, where ironclads first clashed.  Monitor was built in Brooklyn, and I’ve never known where the Merrimack, sailing as CSS  Virginia originated.

Here’s a closer-up view of the fleet in Norfolk, with Miss Katheryne (?) closer inshore.

Since I’m putting this post up quickly, I haven’t discovered much about the huge coal docks in Dunbar neighborhood (?) of Newport News.

From near to far:  USNS T-AKR 310 Watson, T-AKR-304 Pililaau T-AK 3006 Eugene Obregon, and T-AKR 311 Sisler.  Sisler, as recorded here on this blog,  arrived in the sixth boro a bit over a year ago for maintenance at GMD Bayonne.

Coming into the quite breezy Roads is MSC Florentino.

Here’s another shot of Florentina as she passes an unidentified dragger.

Another unidentified bulker in the mouth of Chesapeake Bay.  Star Breeze?

Actually, I’m back in the sixth boro, as of an hour ago. . . but it’ll be a spell before my head is unpacked.

Quick question:  I like the term “Hampton Roads” to described that water bordered by cities that include Norfolk, Hampton, Newport News, etc.  It reminds me of the term I take credit for, “the sixth boro.”  How did “Hampton Roads” originate?  Why isn’t it “Norfolk Roads” or “X roads” with another locality lending its name?  Why did “Staten Island Roads” or some such never take root here?  Just wondering.

To follow on posts earlier this month featuring fishing vessels in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, I offer a vessel that operates in New Jersey and New York, right in the sixth boro in fact.  Miss Callie is less than 60′ loa and more than 30 years old.  Here a bit more than a week ago, she worked just off Ellis Island, and

in January 2010, Miss Callie last season just off Bayonne’s MOT.  How would you  imagine her homeport?

Less than 15 miles from the Narrows, Miss Callie and

a whole other fleet

reside on the

mostly hidden

banks of Comptons Creek, which flows into Raritan Bay.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you’ll enjoy spending a half hour to watch this short video on building a Sea Bright skiff.  More great accents, too, esp. starting about 15 minutes in, along with interesting references to post-Volstead Act activities.   Here’s an article about another Jersey shore boat builder.

More surprises tomorrow.

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