You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘fish tugs’ tag.

In Bayfield WI, this park adjoins a complex named Reiten Boatyard condos,

but the namesake is a gentleman who–with his crew–partook of the food intended for their own wake.  The story?  Click here.

Now you’d imagine that this fish tug–Dawn–would have been built at the Reiten boatyard.  Nope.  She’s another Burger Boat product from 1928.

South Twin was Bayfield-built, 1938.  It fished until 1995 but since then has been a yard ornament in Red Cliff.

Heading south on the Bayfield peninsula, we come to Washburn WI, where I saw John D, which appears to be a greatly modified fish tug.  Maybe I’m wrong but I find no info on her from my sources.

The fish tug site has this to say about H. W. Hocks:  “built at Milwaukee, Wis., in 1935, by Harry W. Hocks, the 50 ft. x 14 ft. all-steel vessel was originally equipped with a 100-120 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. By the early 1940s the boat had been sold to Reuben Nelson, Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Nelson re-powered with a Model D13000 Caterpillar diesel. In 1955 Clyde and Clarence Anderson, Algoma, Wis. purchased the boat, and fished her up until 1991, when she was sold to Cliff Parrish, Brimley, Mich.”

In the village of Cedar River MI, I spotted Art Swaer VI, which I believe was built as late as 1974.

Nearby trap net boat Robert J tied up.

Now way over by the Bruce Peninsula, it’s Mamie and

Anzac K.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

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Just east of the dock featured a few days ago here is another dock.

Eleanor B might be among the “newest” of the fish tugs I’ve seen, 1950.  Click here for photos of her christening at Peterson Brothers in Sturgeon Bay and more.

In the same fleet colors–I think–and two years older than Eleanor B is Twin Sisters, a trap net boat.  If my info is correct, she was once known as Sue Carol.

Kristin Beth  . .  .I can’t find any info about her.  I’m wondering if the shelter forward is original or a repurposed portion of an old boat.

Crews were mostly working on the three boats above, even though I caught these photos without them.  Obviously, no one earns money when the boat’s at the dock.    There were boats–fish tugs–moving toward and away from the docks, like this unidentified one, and

this one, Gary.  If I may borrow from “the fish tug” site, here’s their info on all the modifications done to Gary: “GARY 247461 .Built by Burger Boat Co. in 1945, for William Yauger, Jr., Algoma, Wis. The 40 ft. x 11 ft. steel hulled fish tug was equipped with a 45-54 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. The cabin was of wood, over steel frames, with pilot house mid-ship. Yauger was owner until 1951, when she was sold to Canadian owners, and renamed BARRY MCKAY. In 1962 the boat came back to the U.S., retained her original name, and was owned by William Heward, Rogers City, Mich., until 1969. Bought by Gilmore Peterson, Bayfield, the Kahlenberg was removed, and a Cummins diesel installed. The wood cabin was replaced with steel, and the pilot house moved to the stern. Gilmore sold the boat to his nephew, Michael Peterson, who still has ownership.”

Boats came and went at the dock.  An arrival was Thomas C. Mullen, a 1946 Burger built boat.  Click on the link in the previous sentence for info on all her modifications since 1946.   I may have mentioned this before, but Burger–still in Manitowoc–has built many vessels since 1863.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who plans many more posts on fish tugs and is fully to blame for any errors in info here.

This road trip was partly about seeing more fish tugs, the focus of the next few posts.  One of the current hubs of fishing tugs still fishing is the Bayfield Peninsula, jutting out of northern Wisconsin into Lake Superior.  Bayfield still had chunk ice in the harbor on May 9!

Let’s start out at Bodin Fisheries, and the docks there.

Visible here from l to r, it’s Miss Madilynn, JJC, Twin Disc, and Alicia Rae.

And circling around to the other side, more views from different angles of this set.

Mackenzie May, partly visible here,  is astern of Miss Madilynn.

Looking out of the cove, that’s Madeline Island–the only inhabited island of the Apostles–visible only when the fog is lifted.  Part of the island is home to the Bad River band of the Ojibwe.

But back to the fish tugs.  Note JayJayCee is abridged on the stack.

A major resource I use to learn more about fish tugs is here, compiled by Harvey Hadland and Bob Mackreth.  A second one is Great Lakes Commercial Fishing Forum here.

Miss Madilynn might be the newest of this set, built (I believe) in 1964 in Black River Harbor MI.  Previous names are Isle Royale Queen, Jean-Maur-B II, and Jean Mor B.   She’s 31′ loa.

Mackenzie May was built in 1940 at Burger Boat, 42′ loa.  The Burger family has been building boats since 1863 in Manitowoc WI.

Twin Disc, 45′ loa, carries the original name as when she was built in Sturgeon Bay by Peterson in 1937.  

Alicia Rae was built as C. W. Lind in 1945. The 42′ boat was also once called Kelly.  She was built as hull 209 at Sturgeon Bay Shipbuilding  & Drydock. 

 

I skipped the Garden Peninsula on my drive out to Bayfield, but from George Schneider a few years back, here’s a fish tug he photographed there.

All photos by will Van Dorp, who takes the blame for any mis-processed info here.

Click here for a short video on commercial fishing on Lake Superior.

Even gallivants have destinations, and her it is, the Bayfield peninsula,

one of the best places to see fish tugs, to be included in a number of upcoming posts, following on these past ones. South Twin was built in 1938 in Bayfield and is now out of the water,

but many more like Gary (1945) still fish.  Recall that Urger was once a fish tug. 

Obviously, this is not a fish tug, but an excursion vessel.

Bayfield’s Devil’s Island was once visited by one President, and here’s why.

The town is itself spectacular, even when the fog prevents excursion boats from heading out.  Radar and other navaids can get you out there, but don’t guarantee

that you’ll see much.

Was this Bartholdi’s inspiration . . .?

… just kidding.

Anyone recognize this ferry?

Here’s the story.

 

This kit saw me and ran for its mother, lurking in the bushes.

John D is one more fish tug, and not mentioned in this site, but we’ll leave you here.  As Robert E. Keen says . . . the road goes on forever….

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has crossed a border by now.

Happy fall equinox.  This seems as good a time as any to honor Poseidon with a photo parade of more fish tugs, to really challenge a segue. . .

as is grouping Lady Kate with fishing tugs.  It appears she was built as passenger vessel G. A. Buckling II back in 1952, and is wearing her fourth name now, but

she certainly has the lines of a fish tug despite possibly never having worked as such.  I’m sure someone will weigh in on this.

Doris M is a fish tug built in Erie in 1947, and given the flags,

she appears to still work.

Real Glory is a real deal:  a Lake Erie fishing boat that sells the catch right from the pier, according to this news article.

If I lived nearby, here’s where I’d get my fish dinner.

Environaut (1950) is a 48′ science platform for Gannon University.   

Big Bertha is a 1945 Stadium Boat Works fish tug, built as Gloria Mae.

I love how shore power plugs in here.

Thanks to this site, I can confirm that ASI Clipper, which I’ve wondered about before, began its life as a 1938 Port Colborne-built fish tug.  Here’s a photo from that earlier incarnation.

And finally, we end here, it’s Eleanor D, a 1946 Stadium Boat Works fish tug about to be eclipsed by Stephen B. Roman.  Here’s a closer-up photo of Eleanor D I took almost a decade ago.  Like me, Stephen B Roman has been roaming a lot.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is honored to have been interviewed on WBAI’s Talk Back–New York, We and Thee show.  To hear the interview, click here and start listening at about the 1 hour 38 minute mark on the Sept 20 show.

And if you haven’t seen this yet on PBS, stream Erie: The Canal that Made America here.

And finally, click here for the “fishing tugs” tugster archive.

 

According to the Harvey Hadland site, Kari A dates from 1938.  Previously known as Hustler, she was the product of Burger Boat in Manitowoc.

I was fortunate to have done this walk around in Mackinac City MI

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether fish tugs ever towed trawl nets….

 

Harvey Hadland–a Brooklynite– and Bob Mackreath–a Long Islander–created the definitive site on fish tugs here . . . and Bob currently carries on Harvey’s legacy.  Next time I get up to Lake Superior, I must visit Bayfield and linger in the Apostle Islands, as the trip recorded here came with too many time constraints.

One part of the fish tug site discusses their evolution, here.  If you have Facebook, watch fish tugs break ice in pairs here.  Actually type “fish tugs” into YouTube, and you might get this.  Click here for my previous contributions to the topic.

I organize this starting from oldest and known, at least to me. Of course, many of you know more.  Here’s what Hadland/Mackreth say about Margaret below:  “Built by Peterson Boat Works in 1934, for Joe Schmidt, Algoma, Wis. The 45 ft. x 12 ft. wood hulled vessel was equipped with a Kahlenberg oil engine (size not known), installed at Algoma, and taken from another boat. Schmidt later sold her to Ed Zastrow, Algoma. Again sold to owners in Door County the boat was last operated out of Baileys Harbor, A severe storm in January 1975 resulted in heavy damage to the boat while at a dock at Baileys Harbor. Since that time the boat has been used as a centerpiece in several museum displays.”  Yup, Algoma WI is where I saw it,

along with what might have been a museum . . .

 

but when I walked around town, I found it again . . . on a mural.  To me, this says people in this town want this stories of this boat remembered.  It’s been years since I moseyed along the Michigan side, but Fishtown might be a place where remembrance of heritage fishing is even more elaborate.

Islander (1936) lives on as an on-terrafirma display in Sheboygan.  I was pressed for time when I arrived here, so I got no close-ups. For some Seger family accounts of Islander–even some poetry with the word Kahlenberg used–click here.

Oliver H. Smith, built right in Kewaunee WI,  where I saw it, dates from 1944 and appears to be still fishing.  I sought out Lake fish for meals on this trip and had great whitefish, walleye, and perch.

Nels J (1956?) is hoping to reopen in Duluth’s Canal Park, but as of late June, I couldn’t sample any of the wares . . .

Here’s a mystery boat.  It had just come in from a whitefish run and the crew was busy, and all they’d say was that it was a repurposed research boat.

It has some fish tug lines with a “convertible” afterdeck covering.  It matches up with none of the Great Lakes historical “science ships” here. Any help?

Here’s another Lake Superior commercial fishing vessel, but I can’t find Arlene A in the listings I know.  She has a look in common with the deadrise boats of the greater Chesapeake.

The fish tug nearest the sixth boro–I believe–is Eleanor D (1948), below, which worked out of Oswego from 1958 until 1978 and now on the hard at the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego.  Source of the photo below is this online Oswego history.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

If you’ve never tried lake fish, don’t hesitate.  Someone in Munising that thrills with under the water debris suggested I get my whitefish here, and I can vouch for the place and the fish.   That someone (and crew)  does a great job helping you see beneath the water.  If you want more in the clear waters, see Chris Doyal‘s work.

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