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Yesterday, I had permission to board the 1905 ferry Binghamton for the first time in almost four years.  I had studied my 2011 photos a little, but the boat is so changed inside that I really should have printed out some 2011 shots to try to replicate them.  That said, it’s so modified that that might not have worked in some cases.  Enjoy.

Shoreside entrance in October 2011

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and the same mirror but more context in August 2015.  Preserved or cashed in?

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The south end in October 2011

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and in August 2015.

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The whole vessel in 2011, noting the detail left on the wheelhouses

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. . . and  in August 2015.

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East side as seen from NYWaterways in 2011,

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with a (blurry, sorry) close-up;

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and yesterday, August 201,

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with a close-up,showing that someone clearly detached the name board and stowed it on the river side of the wheelhouse.

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The top level east side of the bar in 2011, and

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2015, showing a more sinuous row of clerestory windows mostly broken.

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This is looking southward along the river side lower level and  . . .

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same shot from 2011 but cropped closer to the landing and

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the same landing in august 2015, with the surveyor showing scale.

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This is looking northward toward the GW Bridge in 2011, and

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and the current less enclosed view.

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The rest of the photos just document the current historic ferry as she looked on August 5, 2015.  For comparison, check “Last Call 1, 2, 3 . . .”   and “After Last Call 1  and 2” .

These are the remains of built-in benches, not add-ons.

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This is looking northward toward the GW Bridge along the west side and

 

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a close-up of decking on that quarter.

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On the same side this is the passageway once leading to the four-cylinder double-compound reciprocating power plant rated 1,400 horsepower,  and from

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from farther southward showing silt left by higher tides.

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This is the opposite passageway to the engine on the sunny riverside,

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and the same from farther southward.

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This is the grand staircase looking southward shoreside

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with mirrored ceilings creating a dusty but otherwise Escher-like possibility as go up to the bar.

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This is the south end of the bar deck looking across the river, and the same

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direction as seen from farther northward.

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A patron at this bar might be very tired and very merry, but the mixologist prepares no more drinks and this

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ferry is definitely out of service.

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And we need someone to update Edna.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for some photos of the ferry by Vlad and Johna.   Here’s an almost 20-year-old story about the sad demise of one former owner.

In Utah a few weeks ago, I saw a deer, recently dead . . . judging by the redness of some remaining tissue, but scavengers like ravens and coyotes had mostly picked clean its intact ribcage, which itself would soon be hauled away in sections by the larger beasts.  Binghamton, the 1905 ferry, is dead.

Riverwater ravens and coyotes have been picking her clean but ever so slowly. I took the next three fotos last October, 2011.

Here’s a post I did with interior shots, including this

elegant staircase leading up to the bar.

Fast forward 10 months:  Sally Seymour took these fotos late last week as they traveled downriver in the rain.

The river has been scavenging, but

ever so slowly, as if to say . . . I know some of this beauty could be saved but  it

just “aint gonna happen.”

If one option is letting the vessel disintegrate and travel downriver piecemeal, then I hope a huge machine gets in here and devours it in a day BUT invites me in to take fotos of each bite.

But oh . . .  that bar!!

Fotos 5, 6, and 7 by Sally Seymour.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  And thanks to Walter Stevens for sending this background article along . .  published early December 2011.

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