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A few days ago I stumbled into a rabbit hole and enjoyed it down there.  I won’t stay in 2008 for too long, but evolution I found in the ship department intrigued me, change change change. It also made concrete the reality of the scrapyards in  the less-touristed ocean-margins of the globe. Take Orange Star;  she’s scrapped now and another Orange Star delivers our juice.  But what a beauty this juice tanker is,

with lines that would look sweet on a yacht. Laura K has been reassigned to another port.  This  Orange Star was cut up in Alang in October 2010.

Ditto Saudi Tabuk.  She went for scrap in November 2013.  The tug on her bow is Catherine Turecamo, now operating on the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

Sea Venture was scrapped in January 2011.

Hammurabi sold for scrap in spring 2012.   She arrived in Alang as Hummura in the first week of summer 2012.

Some D-class Evergreen vessels have been scrapped, but Ever Diamond is still at work.  Comparing the two classes,  the Ls are 135′ longer and 46′ wider.

Stena Poseidon is now Canadian flagged as the much-drabber Espada Desgagnes, which I spotted on  the St. Lawrence last fall.   Donald C, lightening here, became Mediterranean Sea and is currently laid up.

And let’s end this retrospect with a tug, then Hornbeck’s Brooklyn Service and now just plain Brooklyn.  She’s been around the block a bit, and I’ll put in a link here if you want a circuitous tour. I caught her in Baltimore last spring in her current livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what the waterscape will look like in 2028, if I’m around to see it.

Oleander has to be the most regular ship coming into the sixth boro.  Put it this way:  if it’s Thursday, Oleander will arrive from Bermuda, the B in BCL.

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Ever Diamond seems basically to shuttle between eastern Asia and eastern US.

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Some day I should see how many of the 10 Ever Dainty-class of Evergreen Marine container ships I have photos of in the sixth boro.

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IMHO, vessels like Anthem of the Seas are most interesting under some unusual light, like dawn here last week.

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I lamented the fact there were no dancers in the glass ball.

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MV Loujiane is part of GBX, serving, I gather, as both bulk storage of cementitious material and movie set.

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Has anyone ever seen photos of Loujiane, ex-Abu-Louijiane, ex-Bahma . . . arriving in the sixth born?  She must have arrived here at some point in the 1990s, by the photo comments here.

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Over in Walkabout Bay in the spot where Alice often discharges, Pagona was working the other day.

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Rounding out the post, it’s the vessel everyone in NYC should be familiar with, especially her being in proximity to the bridge she nearly brought down.  Recognize her?

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It’s Chemical Pioneer.   During the decade I’ve been watching she’s been a hardworking vessel, but

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here’s the NTSB report.  Click here for one of her ITB fleet mates, now scrapped.

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as in “stocking up,” this sampling records some of the ships headed for sea or a short stay in port during the first half of September.

same with Golden Venus . . . what a name!!

Opal Express

Ever Diamond

Ever Racer and Navig8 Stealth

of course, while we stock up on stuff including home appliances, don’t forget the juice . . .  or juice fuel, the coal for the power plants, here blocking the helmsman’s window as it travels between bridge supports.

oh yeah . . . coal seems abundant enough (9000 tons per barge) here to suggest lots of those stockings will get stuffed with coal.  Coal foto compliments of Jed;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Long Island Boathouse was not the only kayak group cleaning up islands in the boro.  Check frogma’s J-Bay TrashBash for 9/23 here.

Traffic congests highways, expressways, parkways, boulevards, avenues, and even my street.  KVK this morning had lots of free water as James Turecamo and Turecamo Girls sauntered past,

then Odin scooted by straight-kneed on this side of a Bouchard boat

and bent-kneed back.  Oh, the myriad ways to interpret that!

Atlantic Companion headed for sea alone

whereas a plethora of tugs crisscrossed in front of Ever Diamond‘s path.

Photos, WVD.

Such excitement I felt today when email came with these fotos by Shuli Hallack as attachments. At her site, she has a series on cargoes, which you can see on exhibit in Manhattan at Moti Hasson Gallery through June 29, so go soon. At the gallery the prints are poster size.

To do some of the work, Shuli traveled via the banana ship Charles Island from the sixth boro to Ecuador. At this site, see images of the hold. Any guesses on how many bananas make a shipfull? Let me see . . . 21,000 boxes @ N bananas per box . . . I’m sure someone will hazard a guess. The shot below shows a McAllister tug assisting an outbound Ever Diamond set up to negotiate the Bayonne Bridge.

Here’s another angle on that shift of Ever Diamond. I believe the shot looks toward Staten Island, but I can’t place the landmarks.

From this angle, Ever Diamond looks deceptively small.

Many thanks to Shuli Hallack for these fotos.

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