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April 2009 . . . a decade ago but it’s still palpable and present.

How could I not remember the morning before work I stood on the Elizabethport dock wishing the punch-in clock mechanism would slow to a pace slower than McAllister Responder and McAllister Sisters helping Eagle Boston ooze toward her Linden berth . . .   Some who don’t take many photos might not be able to fathom how those moments stick to the memory.

Or the unmistakeable Norwegian Sea light and going for fuel near IMTT .  . at dawn;  it’s unforgettable.   I was hoping there’d no delays on the rest of my way to work that morning.

Another day, I took lunch break in Elizabethport, thrilled that Laura K and Margaret were escorting Seoul Express away from Howland Hook . . ..  backing her down.

And here’s one . . . I recall my pain this morning as I walked north along HRP, conflicted between the hurt of betrayal and the chill of being under-dressed, since I’d crept out early on a Saturday morning thinking that sun in April translated into warmth ..  . and the throaty sound of Melvin E. Lemmerhirt distracted me from all those things.

Also from that dock in Elizabethport, I watched Rosemary McAllister and Responder ease Hyundai Voyager boat toward the dock in Howland Hook . . .

The scene here is harder to recall, but from l to r, it’s Nathan E. Stewart, New River, and –the uniquely named– Gramma Lee T Moran . . .!

In April 2009, I commuted into work early a lot,so that I could catch the likes of this . . . John Reinauer moving a barge southbound on the Arthur Kill… not knowing that a few years later, that equipment would travel across to the South Atlantic.

Scott Turecamo . . .  this is the only photo in this “oldies” set that could have been taken in 2019 as easily as in 2009, except I’d have to photoshop in the current Manhattan skyline in the distance . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes he’s still fit to add to the archives in 2029 . . .

. . . sometimes aka Kate’s Light.   And I did a Katherine Walker post here without including the light in that post.   So here’s my attempt at amends.  All Robbins Reef today . . .

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The tug Robbins Reef is an ex-army tug, sibling of 8th Sea, built in 1953 in Fells Point at American Electric Welding.  Can anyone add info on the former American Electric Welding shipyard?  National also appears to be a sibling, but I am starting to digress.

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Back to the light by that name . . . in the distance.

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See you at the Noble Maritime auction tonight, I hope.

I debated calling this Eagle 4 or Eagles 2 . . . but thought both would be misleading.   It’s like this . . . at 1030 this morning, Eagle Boston was turning on the hook just inside the Narrows.   See the 17-year-old tanker’s new baby sister here.

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Around the same time, Ellen McAllister was eastbound on the KVK, although I knew not where bound.   See third foto here for one of my older fotos of Ellen.

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When Ellen arrived, flood tide was used to rotate the tanker and

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get her headed inbound and past the tanker named for the river-god.  I’m guessing Asopus is a variation of the same name as the upstate creek called Esopus.

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The point here serves as an imaginary fulcrum for the turn into the KVK.

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Amy C McAllister has the starboard side.

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That’s a quite deep floating pool of oil.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s the fleet list.

In less than half day from this writing, March will arrive.  Since I hope for t-shirt mildness by end of March, I’m counting on the month to arrive  . . . like a large feline:  lion plus whatever synergy comes from compounding with year of the Tiger.  (For the record, the tiger portion of that synergy frightens me most.)  As peace offering then, I dedicate this post to the large felines.  The foto of Sea Lion below comes from 2006;  I haven’t seen this 1980 tug in a while.  Anyone explain?

Feline connection with Half Moon?  Some of the hawses, like these two, are

framed by red felines . ..  line lions, I suppose?

Atlantic Leo

Onrust has as figurehead a growling lion today, but this foto from a year ago shows the about-to-hatch beast pre-blond, actually natural wood tones.  More Onrust soon.

Growler . ..  that could be a lion reference.

Eagle Boston, escorted by McAllister Responder, shows registry as Singapore, from the Malay Singapura meaning “Lion City,”   although the namesake was probably a tiger, not a lion at all.  So we should call that nation Tigrapura?

From the platbodem armada headed north on the Hudson last summer, farther is Danish Naval Frigate Thetis, but nearer sailing vessel is Pieternel, registered in the Dutch town of Beneden-Leeuwen (Lower Lion).

Notice the claws hanging from the bow of tanker Puma.

And thanks to my poor eyesight, it’s easy to see the lettering on the Evergreen vessel forward here of Tasman Sea as Ever Feline.  Can’t you make it out?  Squint a bit and it’s skewed as daylight . ..  Ever Feline, also registered in Tigrapura.

All fotos by will Van Dorp, who’s hoping for t-shirt weather and a dip off Coney Island in exactly 31 days.  Anyone care to join in . . .  a Patty Nolan bikini?

Cargoes past featured–besides plain colored containers–trucks, and boats like this. Anyone know the cargo of a rowboat called Liv?  Unrelated to the sixth boro, but the answer follows at end of post.   Some of these

traveled to sea yesterday on

President Polk.  Military colors?  Some engines or generators traveled a little farther back.

No . .  cargo here is not cobalt.  But can anyone tell me the types of oils or chemicals she carries?  For pics of her launch, see here;  scroll down a bit.

As to cargoes or potential ones here, use your imagi . . .

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ion. I still have no confirmation what this fishing boat catches.  MOL Express, 964′ loa.  Bering Sea (ex-Stacy Moran and ex-Cougar) stands by barge in the distance.

E-Bos undergoes lightering.

Cargo on Padre Island . . . rich Hudson Valley silt, soon “dissipant” on the  seabottom.

And more on this later:  a group a thirsty folk in matching red uniforms evoking a certain cargo-delivery outfit from up north . . .  .  Could they have liberated themselves from the hold of Ambrose?  Would they be carrying TWICs?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Liv . . . . info here.  Cargo/powerplant is a young woman named Katie Spotz.

So I was just minding my own business, when Eagle Boston , over 99,000 tons dwt and 830′ loa, approached.  Like a heron fishing beside the creek, I felt wary, but stayed put as

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it zagged to port and

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zigged to starboard and I ducked low and

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bow watch reported back to the bridge that

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all progressed well, since Sisters assisted spot on and

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the proper flag flew. When I decided I’d seen Eagle Boston close enough,  I  left thinking to get solitude, but when I looked over my shoulder from the new location, I felt like a heron from the Powwow River who feels so chased as I try to pass it that it flies forward a few hundred yards, squawking, and

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so did I intimidated, pursued, stalked even.

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When I landed next  I found myself on the starboard side of the Kill and could document from the Responder side as

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leviathan passed and

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Responder passed and

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the full size of  the vessel

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became apparent as it passed by me again

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and  . . .

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distinction and rules blur.  This time the heron in me stayed put and Eagle moved out of sight.

All fotos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Check KennebecCaptain’s animal post here, related to his approach to Singapore, the etymology of that word itself is animal related, a tiger mistaken for a lion 700 years ago. Noticing an animal thread among my own recent posts, I decided to persist. I embedded a link to the “eagle” fleet near end of the the post. Why “eagle?” Doesn’t that bird get disproportionate attention already? Imagine a fleet with names like Dog Boston, Dog Birmingham, etc.

Swallow Birmingham,

(again)

Goose Tacoma,

Coot Boston returned,

Puffin Beaumont or Turkey Beaumont or Gooney Beaumont

I expect to see more of this fleet in months to come. For the full–if somewhat monotonous–eagle list, check out the link to the AET fleet.

Oh, a puffin tomorrow.

All photos in this blog, unless otherwise credited, by Will Van Dorp.

Orange 3 featured a tanker; below is a container ship that shares simply the first part of a name. To see Cap San Lorenzo in Santos, Brazil, click here.

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To see Eagle Boston paired with a trawler, click here.

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To see Vallermosa in Tunisia, showing docking lines laid out on the bow and a tug with its name in Arabic script, click here.

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And I didn’t get close enough to the far orange vessel, but check out the STX car carrier site here.

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Photos, WVD.

You may have concluded that I’m obsessed with–among other things–ships and the fact that they move from here to anywhere, as long as it’s coastal. Foreign flags and even non-roman script like that on Dubai below speaks of exotic shores and harbors and the folk inhabiting them. But I’m not naive, and the love affair our society has with cheap goods from afar arriving here on ships has a cost. The Guardian reports on the planetary emissions from shipping–after after cars, housing, agriculture and industry– here.

 

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Greek on the Maersk ship and Sanskrit on the orange New Delhi Express, and all these ships passing through the modest KVK in less than one hour. Talk about international!

 

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and then this empty fuel barge ready to receive liquid mineral from beneath the North Sea or the swamps along Maracaibo or the Niger delta or the empty quarter….

 

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I hate to be pessimistic, but SUV could expand to supremely unclean vessels, from an environmental POV even if they fuel my imagination . . . Some distance downwind . . . it evens smells problematic. Add this into the price of cheap goods from afar.

 

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Don’t get me wrong. I’m fascinated by these vessels, but cobras and sharks and grizzlies might excite my imagination in the same way, yet . . .

Last week when I transited KVK on Peking, I noticed that crew on other ships take notice when something unusual passes, like a century-old barque. This crewman on Eagle Boston grabbed his camera, and

 

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so did these guys on Kristin Poling.

 

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Crewman aboard New Delhi Express took fotos and waved.

 

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On the other hand, some work needs to get done in port like . . .

 

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these three guys touching up paint on the QV anchor and waterline or

 

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washing the glass around the sky promenade below horns that could swallow this poor guy.  Suppose these same guys put on aprons later and serve drinks?

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“So what’d did you do while in the port of New York, pa?” asks young Hassan or Sammy.

Note: Keep up with the QV through the bridgecam, but don’t expect to see any crew doing touchup paint.

Photos, WVD.

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