You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Dylan Cooper’ tag.

To start, let me reiterate what I said over a half year ago here:  “Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown.”

I recently saw Josephine pushing a fuel barge, and

then light, pirouetting in the current, training perhaps.   Josephine dates from 2018, brings 4560 hp of Tier IV power to the job.

She’s 110′ x 33′.

I missed a shot of Dylan Cooper from the sunny side, so here’s a “dark side of the moon” shot.  She’s a 2015 boat, 112′ x 35′, and brings 4720 hp to the job.

The 2013 Curtis looks a lot like Josephine, in fact the two of them have the same dimensions and maybe mostly the same design.  Differences in the two boats built five years apart may relate to the power plant and invisible upgrades.

What I said about Curtis and Josephine might be the case with Dylan Cooper and Reinauer Twins;  the boats are four years apart and have the same dimensions and power rating.  Of course, details matter, and that’s where the upgrades are to be found.

Dace was out and about today;  she’s been around since 1968, 109′ x 30′ and rated at 3400 hp.

Franklin dates from 1984, 2600 hp and 81′ x 28′, and is very much a traditional looking diesel tugboat.

 

Closing out this post, Meredith C.  dates from 2003.  She’s both the largest and the most powerful of the Reinauer tugboats here:  7200 hp and 119′ x 40′

Note in the photo above two very different tugboats, Meredith and James E. Brown.

All photos this month, WVD.

 

I’m on a short gallivant, but I have no shortage of sixth boro photos, mostly of tugboats engaged in commerce.  Sometimes I look for meetings, and interesting (how ever that’s defined)  ones are best.   Like here…. Kristin and Kimberly,

B. Franklin and Dylan Cooper,

Mary H and Joyce,

Reinauer Twins and Pokomoke,

R/V Ocean Researcher (a multirole survey vessel [aka an exotic] for the offshore energy sector) and Emery Zidell,

 

and Fort McHenry and Philadelphia.

 Then sometimes there are more than two at a time that can be framed in a shot, like here, Elk River, Paula Atwell, Chem Bulldog, Kirby, and B. Franklin . . .

More Bulldog soon.  All photos yesterday, WVD.

It should be no secret that I’m an early riser, have always been one to get up in the “o’dark” hours for the morning golden hour, the best time of day.  Here are two Miller’s Launch OSVs, possibly Rana and Rosemary.

 

A bit later on a different day, I caught Dylan Cooper westbound, with another Reinauer unit off in the distance.

 

Janet D headed into that  same morning, here eastbound.

Ditto . . .  Charles D McAllister and

Mary Turecamo.  In fact, in the photo below, you see all three.   Did you get the golden hour this morning?

All photos, WVD, who thinks this morning’s overcast skies here blocked any gold.

 

Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown, but no matter, this post is all the same fleet.  Name the fleet and the tug?

Talking fleet renewal . . ., Reinauer has a young fleet.  Janice Ann is not even a year old . . .

Laurie Ann, here with Grace D alongside, is just over a decade old.

Dean is not quite a decade at work.

Curtis came out the same year as Dean.  By the way, I didn’t identify the photo in the top photo yet.  Figured it out?

Morgan is the oldie but goldie . . .

Haggerty Girls is about the same age as Dean and Curtis . . . i.e., a young fleet.

All photos, recently, WVD.

And the tugboat in the first photo is . . . Dylan Cooper.

 

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

Here’s the previous post of this focus.  I had others ready to go at one point, but  . ..  ships sail, horses leave barns, and ideas slip away.  Yesterday I spent one hour on the Upper Bay and concluded that it’s a diverse place, starting with this water rising up and obscuring whatever lay beyond it.  Of course, I knew what it was, but I recall the first time I saw such a misting–in the Gulf off Kuwait–and my brain could not process what my eyes were sending it.

Regular and irregular cargoes juxtaposed, boxes and rocks.

Framing a shot puts together what is actually quite far apart.

I’ve done a number of posts on winter fishing, but fall fishing must be super right now, with some fisherman torn between landing that next fish and

 

staying out of the path of YM World and all those tugs assisting it into Global terminal.

 

I know foreshortening plays a role in giving a sense of crowding, but there IS undeniably some crowding going on here.  The ship DID sound a warning at one point.

And that mist in the top photo . . . it came from Firefighter II.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who still has lots of photos from the trip from Montreal.

 

 

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This Bob Hill OT/B creation juxtaposes well with the ever-changing skyline of lower Manhattan, as seen from the East River.

Meredith C. is timing her eastbound trip with a fair tide through the Gate.

Catching the same tide, it’s Evening Star.

Farther SW, Gracie M. makes her way around Bergen Point.

Evening Breeze is a Bouchard new build, only recently arrived here.

On this sunny morning, Janet D pushes a Hughes construction barge past

an inbound scrap bulker.

And in closing, notice the soft spring colors of the trees along the KVK as

Dylan Cooper pushes her barge into the Upper Bay.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose energy level is rising along with the outdoor temperatures.

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

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