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Around 1000 the other day, Walter J. McCarthy Jr. headed outbound through the Canal.   Let’s suppose she was loaded to capacity, 78,850 tons of Western coal.

Again . . . 1000′ x 105′ heads out into the lake.

I’m sure I heard the woman there say to her child, “Let’s wave at daddy.”

 

 

Power comes from four EMD 645 V-20 2-stroke diesels, spinning two four-blade 17.2′ VP props.

 

Below is intermodal transportation at its clearest.   American Integrity, same dimensions and power as McCarthy, has its 250′ boom rotated to port, away from loading gear.  Note the train that almost completely circles the coal pile, like a large snake.  Let’s assume the train is 100-cars long although there may be a few more, each car carrying 100 tons.  So it takes seven trains to fill one of these ships.

Later the same day, American Integrity heads out . . .

 

 

as lots of folks and gulls wait along the Canal  . . .

About 10 months ago I saw American Integrity discharging at the St. Clair Power plant in East China, MI.  It amazing in these next two pictures, how

1000′ foreshortens . . .

Around independence day, it’s appropriate somehow to be talking about american integrity . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday’s post left you in the air–quite literally–circling above Duluth with Beaver Air Tours, the busiest port on the Great Lakes, and passing over a set of Heritage Marine tugs.  Thanks to Lee Rust’s comment on yesterday’s post, I learned a fascinating story about one of the tugs, the 1908 Mount McKay.  Check it out here.   Here we’re flying west looking out toward the St. Louis River.

The pilot pointed out the Edward L. Ryerson, below on extended layup.  Click here for many more photos of this beauty, which began service in Manitowoc in the summer of 1960.  for many more photos and more history of “fast Eddie–capable of 19 kts!!–click here.  This blog has had a previous photo of Ryerson–assisted by Grouper– here.

 

Note the unusual mast-stack combo and the absence of self-unloading gear.

J. B. Ford–launched 1904–is now ending her days after serving them out here as a stationary storage facility.

As this link tells, she survived many storms, outlived all her fleet mates.  The stories of the generations of her crew . . . . I hope they’re not entirely lost.

That’s the Duluth Ship Canal, which I’ll talk about in a future post, and the Aerial Lift Bridge;  J. B. Ford’s scrapping is happening on the land upper right in this photo.

Circling over the Ship Canal, we look down at museum bulker William A. Irvin, named for a former president of US Steel.

Who can tally how many tons of ore she carried in her lifetime from 1938 until 1978 . . . .

 

Let’s head toward the St. Louis River from a different angle and get a closer look at the Arthur M. Anderson.  Click on this link for photos and info of the ordeal she and other lakers face in the December waning weeks of the navigation season.

Anderson has plied the lakes since 1952, and is often associated with the Edmund Fitzgerald, as the last to have contact with the Fitzgerald in the fateful storm of November 1975.

 

Can anyone identify this tugboat?

At the coal pile, it’s  American Integrity . . . I’ll add some closeups of her in tomorrow’s post.

American Integrity is exactly 1000′ x 105′ and with a 78,850 ton capacity,  a “super carrier” built in Sturgeon Bay WI and moving steel ingredients since 1978.

Closing out today’s post . . . we pass part of the Fraser Shipyard, founded by Alexander McDougall, father of “whalebacks” and much more, two of which are currently in very different states of repair in New York waters, the Interwaterways 101 aka Day Peckinpaugh–AND Interwaterways 105, whose current disposition can be seen at the same link as for the 101 . . . the Michigan in the graveyard on the Arthur Kill.

One of the tugs below is FSY  III . . . I suppose the other two are I and II?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to return here near the end of the season.

Here’s more on the port and the lake aka  gichigami in Ojibwa.

 

 

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