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or I could call this Boxing Day 2.

Denak Voyager hauls scrap in her big boxy holds regularly from the sixth boro to Turkey.

This was my first time seeing the 2012 New York Express 

 

or Varna Bay.

Guthorm Maersk has called here before.

Ditto San Cristobal.

ONE München has appeared on this blog before, but ONE Houston has not.

Owned by our neighbors to the north, Fednav bulkers have appeared on this blog before, but this is the first time Federal Nakagawa has. 

This is the second PSL [Precious Shipping Line] bulker to appear on the blog, but it is the first time this one .. .  Viyada Naree has. Note the log racks along the hull.

All photos, WVD, who hopes you enjoy these bulkers and box ships on Boxing Day.

 

You want novelty?  Something new is always happening in the sixth boro, machines and people bringing goods from unimaginable places on the planet.

Full like the 2006 Palena and empty like below.   The 1998 Mississauga Express likely came in to gather up empty boxes.

Such a vessel is sometimes called a “sweeper,” sweeping out a large number of empty boxes.

Denak Voyager seems to run a shuttle of scrap between here and Turkey.  I wonder how many such runs she’s made since her launch in 1996, a quarter century ago.  Will she herself be scrapped there?

BW Kobe, a bulk carrier, was launched in 2019.

MSC Branka looks like the giant of this post at 9400 teu, but old style

yet newer MSC Giulia carries a nominal few teu more, by some accounts.

And over in Port Elizabeth, an OOCL and an Evergreen illustrate why specialized gantry cranes of a certain height are a prerequisite for transferring boxes. Today’s behemoths are OOCL Brussels from 2013 and at 13,208 teu and Ever Forward, a 2020 ship with an 11,850 teu capacity.

So i have a certain amount of time, a trove of photos, and my self-imposed daily deadline.  If you’re wondering how I decide what to post daily, I waver and follow whims.  I post these photos today because this morning I watched this video on YouTube, having noticed it while looking something else (fandango!! it was) up.  With the title “A day in the life of a container ship in middle of the ocean,” this 10-minute video should be of interest.  The title is somewhat misleading since some scenes show NYC and the ocean actually has no middle.

All photos, errors, and snarkiness, WVD.

 

It’s time to remedy my long having short-shrifted bulk carriers.  One came in Saturday morning called Angelina the Great N.  I missed it because I estimated timing wrong.  I hope someone got photos of the bulker with that incomparable name . . . Angelina the Great N.  What’s “N,” I wonder…, but what a great Name!!  Maybe you have a sense of what the “N” stands for?

But to bulkers . . .  often they’re exporting scrap, and Denak Voyager is a common visitor to Claremont.  Notice Rebecca Ann along the left margin of the frame?

Johanna C was in the same berth, Claremont, some time back.  Also, notice that Johanna C has cranes, swung out of the way, which Denak Voyager does not.

Ditto Nordic Barents, and again notice Rebecca Ann. In this case, Nordic Barents is using its cranes and orange peel grab buckets to transfer scrap from scows alongside.

Fu Quan Shan has cranes stowed and clamshell buckets at the ready.

Spar Indus is using its crane to lighter salt, as

is Kodiak Island over by the salt pile.  Because of the so-far mild winter, it’s been a while since a salt ship has discharged there.

Here’s a closer up view of Denak Voyager, seen above, its decks sans cranes, making it less versatile.

Nord Pacific is discharging salt via its cranes. 

And finally, Alerce N appears to have log racks as well as cranes and buckets. 

I’m starting to wonder if this is a bulkers post or a cranes post. Check out the cranes on

Curacao Pearl, a 1984 vessel previously known as Crane Arrow.   I’m not sure the name of this type of crane, but I’ve seen them before on her sister vessel, Atlantic Pearl here.

All photos, WVD, who knows that even more types of cranes exist, like these automated ones on Evans Spirit.  I’m not sure how they work.

Lest someone think all container ships built these days or calling in the sixth boro are ULCVs, consider YM Evolution.  She was launched less than 10 years ago and has a teu capacity less than 5000.  The company is based in Taiwan.

I’ve seen Ebony Ray before, but this is the first time I post a photo.  She was launched in 2008 and is part of the Ace Tankers fleet. 

Nord Chesapeake (2016) needed to be lightened before she proceeded up river to Coeymans.  Note the USCGC Katherine Walker in the distance?

Cronus Leader is an NYK RORO.  To see the “insides” of a vessel like this, click here. For a NYTimes article on cat/truck/etc. ships, click here. For more on this vessel and other “vehicle carriers”, click here.

Denak Voyager is a regular calling in the sixth boro.  She moves scrap metals primarily from here to Turkey these days.

I would never have expected a juice carrier like Orange Sun to be a regular in world ports, but New York has very few orange groves, and given the thirst folks like me have for the juice, juice carriers bring the supply.

 

 

And finally, New Ability is an example of the crude oil carriers that call here.  Since I took this photo, she has departed the sixth boro for Mexico, likely to load more crude.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Sometimes the sixth boro gets crowded, as you can see from these posts.  This post tries to show that, but keep in mind that foreshortening makes these vessels seem closer than they are–the two ships below are more than a mile apart.  Keep in mind also that a water channel is a dynamic medium, current and wind are in play, and . . . there are no brakes.

 

About a hundred yards are between the docked “orange/green hull” and Cronus Leader.

Also, the KVK has numerous curves;  it seems here that the pale yellow will pass starboard to starboard with Cronus Leader,

 

but because of the winding channel, a few minutes later they’re clearly headed port to port.

The dark hull along the extreme left of the photo–and several shots above– is tied to a dock.  It’s the NYC DEP sludge tanker Hunts Point, now in service for over five years, as profiled in this article.  It’s time I do another post on the sludge tankers.

 

Orange Sun has safely passed Cronus Leader, leaves plenty of space passing Hunts Point,  

and lets Denak Voyager, heading to Port Newark to load scrap metals, ease through the opening along its portside.

 

A total of fifteen minutes has elapsed between the first photo in this post and the one above.  Scale here can be understood by looking at the crewman on watch–all wearing orange– on the nearer orange juice tanker and the farther bulk carrier.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that at least two things are remarkable here, both the efficiency of effort on the part of the vessel crews and the variety of cargo represented.

Believe it or not, I’m way inland and without a camera, and a preference for novelty prompts  a different almost-year-end post together.  Rules I made for myself follow:  go to my archives and select the first photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if the first photo in my archives for each month is a person or an inland structure, I don’t use it;  instead, I go forward in that month to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Susquehanna in a very familiar IMTT on the Bayonne side of the KVK.  She’s currently westbound along the Keys.

February was La Perla, an oyster barge on Peconic Bay.

March was Nathan G on the very southern tip of Manhattan, across from the Colgate clock.  She’s currently working in the sixth boro.

Jonathan C was assisting a box ship out in the wee hours near the start of April.  Right now, she’s in the sixth boro, doing or waiting to do a similar escort.

May began with a NYC oyster boat headed north through the Narrows.

Early June it was Tavropos, in the Stapleton anchorage.  The crude oil tanker is currently off the Tabasco coast of Mexico.  The tanker appeared here previously as Moonlight Venture.

July began with Fishing Creek headed out of the Narrows.  She’s currently near Philly.

In August it was Grande Mariner approaching lock E14.  She’s docked in Narragansett Bay.

In September, actually on September 1, it was Kaye E. Barker southbound across Lake St. Clair with the landmark Renaissance Center ahead.  She’s currently upbound on Lake Huron, possibly getting another load of ore for the season.

October began with me meeting Mrs. Chips bound for the Narrows and point south and ultimately Florida, where she currently is.

November it was Denak Voyager taking on scrap.  That’s the Newark Bay Bridge beyond the ship, and Rebecca Ann lost to the left margin.  Rebecca Ann is currently in the sixth boro, and Denak Voyager has exited the Straits of Gibraltar, heading back to the sixth boro.

And finally, December, it’s a mystery boat for now and an unidentified location. Guess if you like . . . I hope to get back to this photo in 2020.

Maybe tomorrow . . .  last day of the year . . . I’ll do the last photo of each month following the same rules.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are dozens of previous posts in this series.

I put this one up today specifically in response to a comment by a dear friend Rembert, who commented here about the apparent high center of gravity on American tugboats.  Mein Schiff 6, which is 969′ x 139′, appears to be quite “tall” but largely because of its verticality.

TUI operates Mein Schiff 7.  I’m guessing the “Leinen los”  here translates to the Dutch lekko [itself an approximation of the English],  the English “cast off.”

Here, from a different angle, is TUI’s logo projected overtop USNS Gilliland.

Steel–a great name–has similar vertical sides,

as does Orange Star, a transporter of my favorite beverage.

Ditto Denak Voyager.

For tugster, here’s an unusual shot of Avra, at the dock at night.

Let’s conclude with Navigator of the Seas, 1021′ x 127,’ so appearances aside, N o t S is actually less beamy than Mein Schiff 6.  Note the Chrysler Building in the photo below?

All photos by Will Van Dorp,who’s been unable to find air draft, particularly on Mein Schiff 6 and  Navigator of the Seas.  Anyone help?

And if you fans of the NYTimes missed Annie Correal’s story about shipping vehicles to Haiti out of Red Hook aboard Beauforce (replacement for Grey Shark?), click here to read it.

 

I missed this one, but I saw it on AIS.  She used to be called Eagle Hope, but I’m thinking someone’s running out of names.

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I caught up with Alice though, here to discharge what she always does . . . aggregates.

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Denak Voyager waited in the anchorage at sunrise and before midmorning coffee, she moved to load what she always does . . . scrap.   Can

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this be the reference?

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Hafnia Lupus . .  being provisioned by the venerable Twin Tube and bunkered by a Vane unit.

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CMA CGM Musset gets escorted by Jonathan C Moran.  I had to look up Musset, but I’d figured it was an artist.

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See that outboard skiff over off the starboard bow?

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Latgale anchored off Stapleton a while back, and

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there goes Chandra B, the can-do, think-big tanker passing by Energy Champion and on its way to bunker the mothership at Sandy Hook pilots.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s off on a reconnoitre.

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