You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Delaware River’ tag.

Almost exactly a decade ago I did this post.  Today I decided to add to it and broaden the geographic scope.  Stick with me to see how broadened this gets.

From the Delaware Memorial Bridge to the entrance of Delaware Bay is about 100 miles.  Near the entrance you see big water and big traffic, like a light Ivory Coast above and a working OSG Vision below.  OSG Vision is mated to OSG 350, a huge barge used to lighter crude oil tankers 342,000 barrels at a time.

Forty miles upstream from the Delaware Memorial, there’s the Ben Franklin Bridge, here with Pilot towing La Princesa and assisted by Grace and Valentine Moran.

Some Delaware River boats are rarely seen in the sixth boro like Jack Holland.

Almost 150  miles upstream from the Philly-Camden area is  Hawk’s Nest Highway, the part of the river once paralleled on the nearer side by the D&H Canal.

Of course I paddled the whole way up there. In fact, this stretch of the Delaware has enough current that a 21st century paddler would not choose to go upstream very far, and a 19th century boat-mule canaler would want to keep navigation separate from the river.

Early summer had its share of young  birds,

deer, and trout visible under the canoe.

Some mysterious paddlers shared the waters.

That New York side of the river . . .

if you look close, you can see in places that these are not natural rock formations. Rather, they support the towpath side of the D & H Canal, way up above the river.

Part of Route 97 is also known as Hawk’s Nest Highway.

To digress, the eastern end of the Canal–about a hundred miles to the NE–is in Kingston NY, and a transshipping point was Island Dock, which

has now overgrown.  I wonder if there’s ever been a project to clear the trees and undergrowth and contemplate a recreation of this important site.  Oil is today’s fuel;  coal was definitely king in this other age.

But let’s back to the Delaware.  North of Barryville, there’s this bridge. At least, it’s now a bridge, but when

John Roebling built it, it was an aqueduct for D & H coal boats bringing anthracite out of the Coal Region to the sixth boro.

 

Here’s a preserved portion of the Canal between Hawley and Honesdale PA, just upstream (water has long long) from Lock 31.   Honesdale was once the transhipping point between railroad cars and canal boats and deserves another visit and maybe a whole post, which maybe I’ll getto when the museum there opens again.

Pennsylvania has place names like Oil City, Cokeburg, and Coal Port.  The coal transported on the D & H came from aptly-named Carbondale, another place that deserves more time.  The commodity legacy is seen in these two businesses

and maybe others.

All photos, WVD, at different points over the past 10 years.  If anyone has ideas about high points along the river you’d suggest I visit, please let me know.  Since my jobs for this summer have fallen through, this might be the year to canoe and hike.

Unrelated, if you haven’t yet read this story about an Argentine in Portugal unable to get home because of cancelled flights and choosing to sail across the Atlantic in a 29′ boat to see his father turn 90, here‘s the link.

 

 

 

Nothing says the Delaware River up around Philadelphia and Camden more distinctly than a group of Hays tugs, here Big Daddy, High Roller, and Purple Hays.  That’s the stern of Grape Ape to the left. No company, I gather, has had more fun naming their boats than the Hays Tug and Launch folks.   I hope Ed Roth got photos of these boats.

And I’ve never had so much fun on the Delaware River area than I did the day my friend John Curdy took me on a tour there.

Timothy McAllister was docked nearby.  She’s almost a twin of the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister.

Amberjack (1981) was still in gray. She’s now the latest Thomas Dann, but I’ve not seen her yet.

Jack Holland was pushing a scow. Today’s Jack‘s in Norfolk.

I’m not sure where the 1967 Jakobson-built Grace Moran is,

but Helen D is now Sarah D, and is regularly seen on the Hudson.

Active, a 1956 Blount product, has been sold south and is now Chandler B, operating out of Virginia.

Soon after I took this photo, Coral Sea was sold to a Nigerian company and, at last report, was operating off Nigeria as Uganwaafor 2. I suspect she’s currently inactive.

Texan here is mostly out of the notch of Ponciana. She’s currently near Beaumont TX on the Neches River.

And finally, it’s USS Arthur W. Radford (DD 968) getting prepped for reefing. About a year later that reefing happened about 30 miles offshore, which appears to be out of range for most fishermen.

All photos, June 2010, by WVD, who will be in and on the Delaware River later this week, way in in the wild part of the river in NYS, trying to commune with the wild.   Don’t be concerned if no new posts appear for a spell after Wednesday.

 

Dave Boone has contributed photos here once before, and his painting are the focus of the second half of this post. In the same post with his paintings, Timothy McAllister appears.

So what’s this orb off the port side of battleship New Jersey, BB-62.  BB .  . as in basketball?

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And what’s that experimental gear on the after deck  of Timothy McAllister?

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And is that orb headed for a swish . . .

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while this crew in unusual garb watch from the Big J?

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Here’s the story and more pics.  It’s Globetrotter week in these parts, and winter and its icy grip . . . be gone . . . this looks like fun!

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Many thanks to Dave Boone for sharing these really spring-fever inducing photos!  See Dave’s work here.

I’d seen McFarland before . . . once at the dock stern out and another time anchored in the middle of the night on Delaware Bay, lit up like a parking lot.  I’m so thrilled that I’ll run a series of her . . . .starting with the USACE dredge passing Pac Alnath.

A first sighting for me . . . Charles Burton.

Back to McFarland . . . one of four ocean-going hopper dredges operated by the USACE.  Can you name the other three?

. . . Nanticoke and Peter F. Gellatly, both pushing Vane barges.

Huge turntable on McFarland.

Chief . . . I believe the 1979 built vesel.

From this USACE publication, I like this statistic:  a full load of dredged materials McFarland carries equals the capacity of 310 dump trucks.

Just before sunrise, she steamed by . . . and passed B. Franklin Reinauer in the city of Benjamin Franklin himself.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

The other three dredges are Wheeler, Essayons, and Yaquina.   For comparison info about the four, click here.  For Bert Visser’s directory with fotos of all the large dredgers in the world, click here.

For a post on Delaware River tugs from 2010, click here.  What I’d like to see one of these days is the loading of livestock down in Wilmington.    Currently, Falconia is at the dock;  I saw her from the highway on Friday.

About a year ago, bright-eyed bowsprite caught a glimpse of USAV LCU-2011 running through the sixth boro.  Last week I knew another LCU was heading northward in the Chesapeake as the schooner race proceeded southward.  Little did I know I’d intersect with it at several points as I returned to the sixth boro myself.  The first visual contact I made at Fox Point State Park, along the Delaware between Wilmington and Chester, PA.    Fox Point’s namesake is S. Marston Fox, who inspired the Park’s creation from what had previously been a riverside dump, and of course many more positive things before that.   See the LCU way in the distance?

And this is looking back toward Wilmington (and the Delaware Memorial Bridge)  from near where the previous shot was taken.

I hope you didn’t think that mere speck above was the only view you’d have of Brandy Station.

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Philly Skyline are visible here.  I’d never have guessed the Commodore Barry was younger than the Verrazano.

To my surprise, a few hours later . . . I arrived at Penn’s Landing, et voila!

The Army has 35 of these vessels.

That’s the Ben Franklin Bridge in the background.

Our third encounter happened the next morning . . . as Brandy Station arced across the river and headed back to . . . . the Chesapeake!

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro.

For an LCU high and dry, click here.  For LCUs worldwide, click here.

Fundraiser notice Dec 1, 2010 for the tug Pegasus!!

I give thanks for the doomed ships getting a (maybe temporary) reprieve, although there’s no denying that Olympia does NOT rise and fall with the tide.  Here she clearly rests

on Delaware bottom.  The draft numbers there suggest a countdown . . . til drydocking and rescue?

While it lasted, the snow seemed more appropriate for Christmas than Thanksgiving.  Timothy McAllister moves upriver, as does

Captain Dann, seeking a load for an empty Lockwood 2002 barge;  see the loaded barge . . . tomorrow.  In the background, Castlegate takes on cargo, after having left New York just Tuesday.

Crew of SKS Tyne fotograph each other as they leave Philly and

Camden and their skylines and

waterfront work and

mothballed vessels. SKS Tyne, goodspeed for whatever your next destination and next ….

Pilotboat Overfalls heads south, and

no matter the day, the harbor beat goes on.

All fotos, Thanksgiving Day, by Will Van Dorp.

Soon afterward, I went out for a Thanksgiving lobster.  Speaking of, read this great article about the Pilgrims and their Thanksgiving eels.

Not a tug . . .  Blount-built Sailor (1977) delivers lubricants to suezmax crude carrier  Cape Bowen. A sixth-boro Blount boat is Twin Tube.  Sailor and Twin Tube–now that’s an evocative set of names– have similar hulls but houses at opposite ends.  But have you guessed the answer to the ponderable at the end of the post a few days back?

Also not a tug:  fragile lightship Barnegat, here on the mud in North Camden.

Still not a tug:  SS United States.  Don’t the lines suggest the throat pleats of a rorqual?  Got some names of tug companies common in the Delaware but not depicted here the past few days?

Bouchard is one.  Morton IV is a regular in the sixth boro, here approaching the Commodore Barry Bridge.

K-Sea is another.  I’m not sure why Coral Sea lies beside Arthur W Radford here in the Navy Yard.

And then there’s Penn Maritime . . .  here’s Amberjack.  Penn specializes in transporting heated asphalt.

But Vane Brothers is ubiquitous.  Here’s Pokomoke, and

Patuxent,

Bohemia,

Charles Hughes, and

Roanoke.  Two other Vane boats lay in the Schuykill, but too close to Sunoco to risk taking a foto.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, but again special thanks to Jeff Schurr and John Curdy.

You might wonder what’s happening in the sixth boro.  Me too.  I need to have a look, although I’ve really enjoyed Pelican Passage‘s  shots these weeks.  See some  fireworks here.  As for me, it’s prime gallivant season the next few weeks.  See you on the go.

News flash:  unrelated . . . is it true that a duck nursery has been located inside Cornell‘s bow pudding?  Don’t you feel cooled just looking at this January foto?

Over on the port side of the upbound  Jag Leela, name that tug.  Answer follows at the end of the post.  Doubleclick enlarges.

Jack Holland (ex-Phyllis and Papoose, 1984). I think.

Left to right:  Purple Hays (Bludworth-built, 1966)  and Timothy McAllister (ex-Osprey and Barbara McAllister, 1966)

stern of Grape Ape (1951), Big Daddy (1954 RTC-built), High Roller (1969 Jakobson-built) , and (again) Purple Hays.

Madeline (Gladding-Hearn, 2008), one of the Wilmington Tug vessels.

Lucky D (1970).

Neill McAllister (ex-Puerto Nuevo, 1964) over on the Gloucester City, NJ, side with the Walt Whitman Bridge behind.

Teresa McAllister (1961) and floating office.

B M Thomas (1926).

Bart J Turecamo (1968).

Helen D. Coppedge (?)  There’s a Coppedge in Portsmouth, NH,  also.  What is the Coppedge history?  Here’s an older but interesting Portsmouth article.

Texan (scroll thru) matched with specialty barge Ponciana, here out of the notch.

Grace Moran (left of foto and Jakobson, 1967) and Valentine Moran (the mystery tug of the first foto in this post and ex-Coastal Jacksonville, 1977) spin Jag Leela.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Special thanks to Jeff Schurr and John Curdy.

Here’s a ponderable:  which companies, very common to this part of the Delaware River, have been omitted?  Answer tomorrow.

See Otherwatersheds 6 here.  Many thanks to Jeff Schurr and Capt. John Curdy, who gave me a first-rate tour of 20ish miles of greater Philadelphia waterfront from the Delaware line up to the Delair and Betsy Ross Bridges.  According to a studied source: “Of the 360 major American ports, the Delaware River ranks second in total tonnage shipped, and eighth in the dollar value of the cargo. Every year, 2600 ships call into our port, which claims to employ 75,000 people.”   And another from RITA, too pithy to summarize, lists the largest trading countries and the predominant products in and out through the port.

More posts and maps on Philly–in all its vibrancy as a port– in the next few days, but for now, a sampling, an overview of old and new, starting with the most threatened ones.  Of course, that would be SS United States–which I wrote about here.  For info on the raffle, click here.  Doubleclick on fotos enlarges.

Equally endangered is Olympia.  Click here and here for info on efforts to save this piece of history.

Setubal, Portugal-built Grand Banks dory boat Gazela graces the waterfront.  Find more about her history here.

Mischief (ex-Thornton Bros, Cissi, and Cissi Reinauer) in her current colors and habitat.  A previous appearance of this vessel is here.

Inactive carriers John F. Kennedy and  Forrestal await their fate,  as

does destroyer Arthur W. Radford.  Soon to be an Atlantic reef ?

Weeds grow from the fendering of  B. M. Thomas, launched in Groton, 1926.

Like I said earlier, port of Philly has a vibrancy, illustrated by OSG Vision and

“shortie”  (77′ x 34′)  tug Reid McAllister.

More Delaware pics up tomorrow, but for now, in the Pyne Point section of Camden, Anne is the skipjack rigged schooner (1965, masts farthest to the right)  hiding in the weeds.  Now look in the extreme left side of the foto . . . there in the weeds, what

might this be?  Anyone identify this mystery tug?

The interactive map below shows Pyne Point Park;  the weedy inlet is just to the right of the park label.

Again, many thanks to Jeff and John.  All fotos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

What Bonnie does here for Flatbush, I’ll attempt within the sixth boro, starting here with the venerable Mary Whalen and

King Dorian (glad that’s not “durian“) before shifting to shorter wavelength in

Jo Selje and

Panagia Lady, here lightering onto (I think) JoAnne Reinauer III.

Continuing across the spectrum with Stolt Vanguard and sibling

Perseverence.  Then

and Ever Refine and

the snarkiest Don Juan and

the Bermudian cargo shuttle Oleander and

Bro Albert.

For something my eyes register as indigo, violet, purple . . . I can’t guarantee you’ll agree . . .  I had to go outatown, like back upstate to Newark and a foto from last summer of Grouper. Has she now begun her journey west?

All fotos . . . so far … Will Van Dorp.

But from shipjohn via Shipspotting . . .  here’s that purple fleet down in Philly . . . like  Purple Hays,

Big Daddy, and

Grape Ape. Many thanks shipjohn.

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