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OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

Many thanks to Robert Simko and Lee Gruzen for sending me some photos and lots of questions yesterday morning.

This large gray vessel–SS Cape Avinoff (AK-5013)–arrived under tow

from, I believe, National Defense Reserve Fleet on the James River, where it has been used for training.

As SS Cape Avinoff is moved stern first closer to GMD Shipyard in Brooklyn, Chris Kunzmann got this photo.

Many thanks to Robert, Lee, and Chris for use of these photos.  Can anyone confirm why she was moved to a NYC shipyard?

Robert publishes The Broadsheet.  Click here and here for info on GMD Shipyard.

Previous posts involving “dead ships” can be found here.

 

HanJin Lisbon can be called a “lazarus ship.”  Although the other three tugs are obscured in this foto, HJ Lisbon came in “cold”  last Saturday, technically a “dead ship” as she was escorted to Port Elizabeth.  But a bit over 24 hours later, she left under her own power, raised from her earlier cold.  No further details.  Foto and info from John Watson.

Maersk Carolina came in self-powered and with avian escort.  Maybe the gull was eyeing those

custom containers up top.

James River Bridge . . .  lots of Bridge vessels these days.   I’m not sure which James River it’s named for.

BBC Germany on the KVK . . . sounds like a great name for a movie . . .?

Here’s Quantico Creek lightering Glen, who arrived in the sixth bro just before

Glenda Melissa.

Over in Bayonne, Celebrity Silhouette loads.  Believe it or not, she carries a half acre grassy plot!   Might it be a greens garden for frisee and arugula, escarole and cress?

And finally, Newtown Creek, she who accentuates our commonality, she the sludge tanker.

Top foto by John Watson;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

A postscript on Random Ships 17, which featured fotos of Orange Star:  Toby sent me a link to this article on transporting orange juice . . .  an interesting read here.  Thanks much, Toby.

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