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Click here and here for the first two sets of photos taken by JG.  JG’s photos–of the past–give context for the present and future.

In today’s post, all of the vessels at one point belonged to the same fleet, except one.  All have continued in service, except one.

Volans, photographed here in 2009, is now being reborn as Hannah.

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For a short time, Volans became David McAllister, photo below from 2013.

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Leslie Foss, photo from 2011, is now Simone, and I caught her in the sixth boro here in 2015. Simone trades internationally.

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Leo, taken here in 2007, now works as Bridget McAllister.

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Scorpius, photo from 2008, has worked mostly in the sixth boro as Meagan Ann, who first appeared here in this blog in  . . . 2008.

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Orion, which I visited back in 2008,  became Matthew McAllister.

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And finally, the last one, the one facing left, the only one that is no more.  She was scrapped after sinking in Narragansett Bay in 2008.  The photo below is from 2006.

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All these tugboats except the last one once made up Constellation Maritime, which is no more.

Many thanks to JG for use of these photos.

 

Recognize the tugboat below?  Answer follows.

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David McAllister, photo from 2013, has recently changed hands and is currently undergoing “re-power and life extension” as Tradewinds Towing Hannah.

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Draco, photo below taken in 2007, shows the vessel that began life in 1951 as Esso Tug No. 12.  I caught her in the sixth boro as Co here (scroll) back in 2009.

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Pleon, built in 1953, has appeared on this blog several times recently.

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Canal Deluge, shown here in Fournier Towing and Ship Services colors, has since been sold to Trinidad, where she is (somewhat appropriately) know as Boston Lady.

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And finally, originally a steam tug built in the mid-1920s to assist ships and break ice on the Delaware river, the 125′ John Wanamaker claimed the title of the last steam tug operating commercially in the US, but after several stints as a restaurant boat, she was cut up in New Bedford sometime around 2007.   Anyone have photos of her last days or her last decades as a restaurant in at least three different New England locations?  For a great story about her–and many other boats– read Jim Sharp’s With Reckless Abandon It seems that Jim has owned at least half the historic vessels on the East coast at one time or other. His Sail, Power, & Steam Museum will reopen in the spring.

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Again, thanks to JG, these photos from the near but irretrievable past.

Oh, and that mystery tug at the top, she’s of course Pelham, seen in this post (scroll) and many others here.

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