You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Curtis Reinauer’ tag.

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Bear with me here.  Let’s go back to 1999.  Nicole Leigh Reinauer was built in Alabama Shipyard to push a 135,000 brl barge.  Look at the lines of this 118′ x 40 tug working with 7200 hp.

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Ruth M. Reinauer is Senesco hull # 202, 112′ x 35′ and 4000 hp. She is the first of the “facet tugs.”  As you can read in the link in the previous sentence, the design change was driven by easing the construction process of both tugs and double-skin barges.   If the shape of the reminder of tugboats in this post seem odd to you, read this interesting article by Casey Conley with a title that alludes to the (now retired) F-117 fighter.

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Laurie Ann Reinauer followed, same dimensions and power and hull # 203.

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Reinauer Twins came out in September 2011, same basic dimensions by greater horsepower . .  4720.

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I’m not sure what happened with hull#205, but #206 is B. Franklin Reinauer, 110′ x 33′ and 4000 hp.

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By the way, there’s a LOT going on in the background of this photo, including what appears to be dredge Atchafalaya in dry dock.

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Curtis is hull# 207, same numbers.

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Haggerty Girls is hull# 208, same numbers.

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Dean Reinauer is hull# 210, 112.2′ x 35′ and 4720 hp.

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And that brings us up to date with respect to Reinauer facet tugs . ..  it’s Dylan Cooper, operating less than a full year now, with the same numbers as Dean Reinauer.

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Note that it was exactly five years ago that we were following the trials and tribulations of loading the previous Curtis and Dean Reinauer  onto the heavy lift ship for West African waters.   I’d love to see photos of those tugs five years on and working out of Nigeria.  Does anyone out there have access to such?

For extensive documentation of many of these facet tugs during the building process, click here for the bulging albums created by Rod Smith at Narragansett Bay Shipping.

All photos of the handsome set of workhorses by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here were some previous posts with “dawn” in the title.  I’d hoped to get photos like these on Easter Sunday, but  overcast skies obscured the sun rise color.

Sunrise this particular morning was 0643.  The photo below was at 0644.

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Quantico Creek pushes a barge eastward while Stephen Reinauer heads west.

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Curtis Reinauer westbound; Emerald Coast eastward.

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And by 0729, the light was losing some of its richness.  This is the joy of springtime light.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has left the building and the sixth boro again and asked the robots to put up the next week or so of posts.  division of labor?  I take the pics and write some commentary, and the robots do the rest.

From a moving vantage point in the center of the Upper Bay, I look south and see Shawn Miller pushing a deck barge to facilitate some trucking on the sixth boro.

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To the north, it’s Gabby L Miller crossing with 1WTC in the background.  At Blue Friday plus

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80 days (i.e., 80 days since that day after Thanksgiving Atlantic Salvor brought antenna segments into the harbor), this is what the top of 1WTC looks like.

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The new Curtis Reinauer lay at anchorage.  Here are a few shots of the old Curtis . . . now working in West African waters.

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Joan Turecamo, one of the last upstate NY Matton-built vessels, heads to Gowanus Bay.

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Finally . . . it’s Rae, moving a recycling scow probably back to Newtown Creek.   Rae’s my age!.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Here’s a foto and article from today’s NYTimes about dead ship Triumph.  The caption mentions that USCG tugs are towing the vessel into Mobile.  Predictably, the alleged tugs are not identified.  For info on the tugs, click here.

It’s no surprise that the last time I used this title happened also in the spring.  Morning sun . . . and Gramma Lee T gets paired with her own shadow.

Later, Laura K passes Gramma Lee T.  Laura K escorts in NYK Nebula whereas Gramma Lee T stands by Torm Venture, which

casts its orange haze onto wavelets, coloring in some of their planes beyond the buffleheads.

Nebula stays in port only enough time to shift some containers and then heads back to sea, and another port.   Savannah?  Click here for a global set of NYK ship fotos assembled by an aptly-named “hive mind.”

Weeks 533 –veteran of posts with locomotive and Airbus A320 liftings, heads out the easat end of KVK, powered by a a motley pair,  brace made

up of Robert IV and Weeks Kathleen.  Here are fotos of 533 righting Stellamare after its 2003 accident in Albany.  Compliments of  Tom Whittemore, here are more fotos of Weeks 533 “uncapsizing” Stellamare.

Before a skyline dominated by GS in Jersey and Empire State in Manhattan, here go Lucy (farther) and Curtis Reinauer.  (Previous names for the pair, respectively, include May McGuirl, Morania No. 7;  and Delaware. )

while in the very close, a pair of mallards floats past, the greener head of the two eying the lens.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, clearly taken this week before the late winter monsoon moved in.

O . . . oil, petrOleum, fuel, which I’m guessing is the sixth boro’s most valuable cargo; not to say sand, rock, scrap, cement lack value.   Wonder fuel of the past 150 or so years, thanks to what Edwin Drake started.  But what will power home and industry and what cargo will hold greatest value  150 years from now, or a hundred, or fifty, twenty.

Tankers move crude in, and other tankers move petroleum products both in . . . and out.  We export petroleum products –like diesel–due to relative refining capacity, but I’ve no clue where Stena Performance goes when she leaves the Kills for sea.

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Adriatic Sea, southbound on the Hudson near Bear Mountain Bridge, pushes what might be petroleum or might be ethanol.

aaao2Here Taurus pushes a fuel tank.

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As does Curtis Reinauer.
aaaocr Bering Sea has a loaded fuel tank on the hip.

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When a tanker comes into this terminal on the KVK, they hook into hoses like these.

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Here’s the whole set.  Is there a technical term for these, both individual hoses and the entire set?

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Scorship King Douglas, exactly a year old, came in this morning, but it hardly seems loaded to capacity.  Why not?  Tug is Rowan M McAllister.

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When Eagle Atlanta came in, she seemed deeper in the water than King Douglas, but maybe  both were to capacity.  Tug is Marjorie B McAllister.

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What was uncomfortable about writing this post is all the unknowns, and I know I don’t know a lot related to oil.  Yet, my daily life could not happen without oil.  Very few people on the face of the Earth can say they are totally free of a reliance on oil.  It’s an amazing admission, given that it’s a finite resource.  Yet, I think I can safely say that most of us don’t know much about the source, international supply and refining chain, and transportation of items in their lives stemming from petroleum.  Like the gas I put in my car today, I’ve no clue where it lay in the Earth for hundreds of hundreds of thousands of years before–relatively recently–it started the journey toward the gas tank of my car.  And the oil that refining transformed into plastics and chemicals in my house, which pocket beneath the surface did that come from?  If I burned wood to run a steam engine, I might at least know which tree I cut to get this nice hot fire, but oil . . . not a hint.   And it all bothers me because I’d like to know.

Metaphorically, oil as fuel and lubricant . . . it’s potent stuff, without which, nothing good happens.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post, but go back to “Meditations M” . . . on masts.  Les Sonnenmark labeled almost all the units on Yankee‘s mast.  Can anyone help with the topmost one?

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This starts a new series . . . actually all those “random” tugs in the series that went up to 39 (use the search window to trace’em back) were never really random either.  But these . . . this new series . . . I won’t even pretend are “random.”  Like this Pegasus . . . I’ll have to consult with my dear friend of VHF vigilance (or anyone else) to learn how interaction of the airways distinguishes this Pegasus shown here in mid-KVK from the 1907 one.

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With the next two I respond to mijn vriend zeebart, the irreverant skipper of a North Sea anchor-handling tug who has looow tolerance for the unusual, especially with respect to necks  . . . or upper wheelhouses.   I’ve never seen this Curtis Reinauer configuration before myself.  Was watch posted  here for unexpected weather or other skyward phenomena?

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Bart . . . if you’re going to have fun with what-you-call strange in North American design, at least get some better fotos.  And yin agrees with my yang there.  Were Barbara C. and Robert J. engaging in some peculiar springtime mating dance?

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Evening Tide, featured here many times already, sports a swan-mimicking curved neck you should just looove, Bart.

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Finally, dedicated to one of the finest wits of the sixth boro, a gent I have utmost respect for, he of the red cap in this foto, the artist who recently sent along a foto he called “sisters of darkness,” of McAllister Sisters on its way to a dawn rendezvous with Iwo Jima, here’s a shot I’ll call sisters of light . . . or maybe sisters of reflection.

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More non-random tugs surely to follow.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

days left . . . Curtis and Meredith do the doe-see-doe. Might Meredith be relaxing before the sprint?

And Catherine T and Miriam allemand left grand right ‘n left.

A foto from last year: Cornell and Janice Ann in North River whitewater.

Don’t know if you saw the notice “In Search of the Toughest Tug” in the NYTimes this morning? In the fourth paragraph, the reference to a female pirate luring urbanites to sea intrigues me. Might her name be Alice? Might she look like the foto below? If so, I’ll be lured.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp

I called this Bronze 1 some months back. It’s the distinguishing color for the Reinauer fleet.

Juliet

Curtis

Dean

Craig Eric

Meredith C.

Morgan . . . and oh so many more all pushing fuel. It’s the safest way to move fuel closer to your gas station. Lisa M. is the expert on Oil on the Brain–and everywhere else.

Given all these names, I’d love to see a Reinauer family tree.

My father–a dairy farmer all his life–used to name cows for friends and acquaintances but never family members, never cute names. I wonder what he’s have done for naming if he’d pursued his childhood dream of being a Rhine barge captain.

Photos, WVD.

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