You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Cross sound Ferry’ tag.

New London with bow ramp open here . . . has to be the fastest and one of the cleanest boat for Cross Sound Ferry (CSF).  I mean cleanest burning,  with its recently added Tier 3 Cummins power.  She was CSF’s first new build, coming off the ways in New London in 1979.

What I like about New London is the design allows a passenger to see over the vehicles at the wake, vehicles oriented toward the stern

or the bow.

John H, the largest CSF  vessel, was built for the company in 1989.

She has the capacity of 100 vehicles and 1000 passengers.

Mary Ellen was in 1983 by Offshore Shipbuilding in Palatka Florida as Grand Republic for the Bridgeport & Port Jefferson Ferry (BPPF).  That fleet will be next when I post more on ferries on Long Island Sound.

Once loaded at Orient Point NY, she backs out of the rack while lowering the bow ramp.  In that she reminds me of Badger, although there, it’s the stern ramp that lowers upon departure.

I did several trips on BPPJ ferries back in 2000 as I shifted domicile from MA to NY, so I’m guessing I rode or saw this vessel ass Grand Republic at that time.

Caribbean Ferry is called that because she originally worked in the Caribbean after coming off the ways at Blount in the 1970s.

And until I get photos of the remaining CSF boats, we’ll end here with the most distinguished, Cape Henlopen, launched in 1943 as USS Buncombe County (LST-510) from Jeffersonville Boat and Machine Company.  In early 1944 as an LST, she departed NYC for a convoy crossing over to Europe, where she took part in the D-Day landings.  Subsequent to the end of WW2, she worked as a ferry crossing the Chesapeake Bay, then Delaware Bay, before coming to CSF in 1983.  She also operates with Tier 3 engines at this point.  That’s the light on Little Gull Island in the distance.

One goal I’ve set for the nearer future is to ride or at least see all the other CSF boats.

All photos, WVD.

See the previous 17 posts off along this tangent here.

Let’s start here.  Name that truck.  Answer follows.

How about this vehicle, with its brand info stripped off?

It should be easier from this angle.

If you were wondering about the context for the top photo, here’s more of the field.  Note the USCG members on either side of the “bridge.”

This “marine highway” shows that the ferry needs to rotate to put stern to at the dock.   Know the ferry line?  This ferry itself?  The ferry in the distance?

On the same run as the top photo, that’s a mighty narrow bridge to the pier.

 

Ditto.  I can’t tell the brand of the red truck above or the blue below, although it would be safe (though not necessarily correct) to say a Peterbilt above and a KW below.

It takes expert judgement to drive onto and off this ferry.

And finally . . .  here’s the top mystery pickup.  The name’s on the tailgate.

All photos, WVD, from the ferry New London.  The red pickup is a 1950 Chevrolet.  The black/gray pickup . . . a 2021 Jeep Gladiator.  The other ferry is Susan Anne. Click here to see the whole Cross Sound fleet, including the ex-Zephyr.

Any guesses?  It’s a view I’d never seen until a last-minute arrival on the ferry set me up to be the very last car to debark.  The afternoon light wafting into the cargo space was a treat.

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Here she is in profile departing New London.

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built 1983, major renovation in 2003

 

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In the right light, she’s a beauty.  Notice the low profile of the North Fork of Long Island along the horizon to the right below.

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Just to the left of the stack, that’s Cape Henlopen, ex-LST 510.

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Finally, another shot of the empty cargo deck.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the previous post.

It was all highlights while taking two ferries to get from Long Island to my destination, but here are some photos.  I left Orient Point along with small fishing boats like Fishy Business, 1995 built.

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North Star, built in 1968 as an offshore supply vessel, was purchased by Cross Sound Ferry in 1984 and converted to an auto/passenger ferry.

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As North Star arrived, the 2007 Plum Island left Orient for its namesake island.

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Hudson River-bound Grande Caribe (1997) cut across the Sound with its unique profile.

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Eventually the destination appears . . . the cliffs off the north side of Block Island.

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The unmistakeable Viking (1976) passes as we round the island toward New Shoreham.

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Interstate Navigation’s Block Island (1997) welcomes us into the old port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Behold ex-LST-510, USS Buncombe County, preparing for a routine landing over in Connecticut.

Bowsprite drew it, so it drew me . . . I had to go see again, even though some years ago I’d ridden her.  If you look at her peers launched at JeffBoat in  late 1943 and early 1944, you’ll agree she’s a survivor.

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She follows the route that could have been a bridge from Long Island to Rhode Island!

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I believe this lighthouse, passed here by MV John H,  is still for sale . . .

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Click here to see frogman’s encounter with Plum Gut between Orient Point Light and

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Plum Island.

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Meanwhile . . .  here’s 495  . . . the water way.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for more info on the Cross Sound Ferry, mentioned here on tugster a few months back in connection with a certain 2003 Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree.

Finally . ..  unrelated but very important, vote here as often as you can given all your devices and browsers to get funding for USS Slater, about to come downriver for repairs.

 

You might be wondering about the connection between the vessel below and my previous post . . . here about the delivery of the 1997 Rockefeller Center tree.

It turns out that in 2003 the vessel below —North Star— formerly  offshore supply vessel known as Rio Hanna (1968) and Pelto Seahorse

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carried these Rockettes and a very happy crewman

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along with the 2003 Rockefeller Center Christmas tree from New London to a pier near Intrepid, where the ramps were positioned and the truck rolled off on its way east to deliver the tree.    Read all about it here in the New London Day of November 12, 2003.    The fifty-year-old 79′ Norway spruce came from yard of Frances Katkauskas in Manchester, CT.

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Here the crew pose for a foto near the Circle Line pier after delivering the tree.

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Many thanks to Guy Torsilieri for providing the lead and to Richard Sise of Cross Sound Ferry for providing these photos.  These fotos were taken the year I moved to NYC but three years before I started this blog.

If anyone has other pics to share, I’d love to put them up here.  And 2014 . . . sounds like another tree-by-water delivery is overdue.

Bowsprite’s rendering of the orange aka ġeolurēad Staten Island ferry John F. Kennedy feels like a sip of warm cider on a cold autumn evening.   The Staten Island ferry adopted this color–clever . . .  they picked a color that both promoted visibility/safety and nodded to heritage–in 1926.  Before that, the color was basic white.    So here’s my question:  are there large ferries elsewhere that are not mostly white?  And this takes me way out on a limb, but can anything be read into the fact that a national eating/drinking establishment uses a similar orange color?

Cross Sound Ferry’s Cape Henlopen is mostly

a color that would blend into snow and fog.  That’s Joan Turecamo in the background, off New London.

The same is true also of Susan Anne, here off Plum Island.

Yes, that’s Manhattan in the background.  Can you guess this ferry white vessel?

It’s Twin Capes . . . a Delaware River and Bay Authority vessel, on a special mission in the sixth boro.  DRBA has its own vessel named Cape Henlopen, a geographic feature located in Delaware.

My other ferry experience this year introduced me to the Washington State Ferry system, with green trim, but otherwise

mostly the color of snow and fog.

Here is a Tugster post on Champlain ferries.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Please send fotos of non-white ferries . . . or non-sixth boro orange ones or banana yellow or plum . . . . two-tone green?

So it doesn’t take long:  Capt. Bill Miller sent this undated foto (late 1940s?) of what could be the green CNJRR ferry Cranford (launched 1905 from Wilmington), which ran in the harbor from Jersey City.  Cranford has served as a reef since 1982.  A slightly older vessel formerly known as Lakewood (1901) served as the last CNJRR ferry until 1967; then renamed Second Sun it served as education center for the Salem nuclear power plant until 1992, when it  had a third life as a fancy Philly waterfront eatery called Elizabeth, which transitioned into a Hooters venue until 2002.    Today, the vessel is probably the only Hooters-logoed reef in the universe.  How can I nominate ferry Elizabeth for induction into the Hooters Hall o Fame . . .

Related:  The Washington State Ferry system uses 22 vessels to move 23 million passengers per year;  the Staten Island Ferry uses 10 vessels to move 20 million passengers per year.  Hmmm!

Unrelated:  a stealth sub losing its stealth on a Scottish mudbank.

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