You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Cosco Osaka’ tag.

The phrase “supply chain issues” appears to have eclipsed “pandemic” in my thoroughly unscientific and entirely anecdotal and mental survey. The PANYNJ website does provide some “facts and figures” you can mine and crunch to compare 2021 container movement here to that in 2012.  An easy conclusion is that the container ships are generally larger, so throughput in and out is going to be greater.  Can you guess how much greater?

Let’s look at a sample of container ships I saw in January 2012.  I’ve no idea what the largest container ship serving P of NYNJ was in 2012, but CMA CGM Jules Verne, a 2013 vessel, is 1300′ x 176′ and carries 16,000+ teu.

Evergreen back then was operating Ever Devote. The 1998 Panamax ship is still around.  Numbers are 964′ length x 105′ width and 4211 teu.  That means it fit through the original Panama Canal, just barely;  anything over 105′ wide does not.

2005 Cosco Tianjin is also still working.  She’s 915′ x 131′ and 5752 teu.

 

Cosco Osaka, 2008, 849′ x 105′ and 4578 teu.  She’s still working.

MOL Endurance, 2003, 964′ x 125′ and 4578 teu.  She’s been scrapped.

APL Chile, 2000, 656′ x 89′ and 4038 teu.  She’s also scrapped.

OOCL Norfolk, 2009, 852′ x 105′  and 4506 teu.

By the PANYNJ numbers, I see that in 2021, a total of teu lifts (loaded and empties) is around 9 million, not quite double the 2012 figure of about 5.5 million.  Bigger ships calling, like CMA CGM Jules Verne, slows things down obviously;  one of those carries almost the same number of containers as FOUR times APL Chile.

All 2012 photos here are credited to WVD, and any errors in calculations get blamed to the same guy.

Keep in mind that besides container traffic, the port moves a significant amount of other cargo, including dry bulk materials, petroleum, other wet bulk cargoes [like orange juice], vehicles, and passengers. If I’ve left anything out, I’m sure you’ll tell me.

I’ll use fotos from the past week, since the past two days have been darky and rainy.  Penobscot Bay is called an ice-breaker, a mission not yet activated this season.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

M/V Dynamic Striker–with an arresting name–probably wants to forget its high-speed chase on the Indian Ocean two years ago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Susana S and (in the distance) Intrepid Canada await in the anchorage.  Since that moment (Wednesday), Susana S has departed for points east and Intrepid Canada has move up Raritan Bay and into Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here Cosco Osaka departs the KVK, bound for sea, i.e., Boston and then maybe the Canal in Panama.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’m guessing that every major port in the world sees a member of this fleet now and then, most looking like Bow Fortune here.  For great fotos of these set, taken both onboard and from a distance, click here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

John B. still lies in a beached position, but  yesterday Brian Nicholas rather than Sarah Ann attended crane barge Raritan Bay.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

HanJin San Francisco left here a week ago, made a few stops headed south, and is now bound for the Canal.   Previously I caught her here in late September this year.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stena Primorsk–named for the largest Russian port on the Baltic–has lingered in the harbor for the better part of a month now, occasionally  giving the impression she’s outbound somewhere distant.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Two weeks til winter . . . and we’ve not yet seen a frost locally.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,563 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2022
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31