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Growing up in a beautiful rural place, I never imagined some day living in the largest megalopolis on the US.  But here we are; I live in a concentration with over 50 million others.  That many people and consumers together has implications.  Click on the map to see source.

Here’s how a plethora of goods comes in . . . .

Ten years ago, single vessels this large never transited the sixth boro…

Just yesterday, no fewer than three of these ULCS found themselves in port, and they’ll soon push today’s limits.

So I have my own word for them:  megaboxforus.  Megaboxforuses . . . could be the plural.

 

 

 

And they change hands . . . Edison not long ago was Maersk Edison.  Maersk possibly traded in a 1200′ for a 1300′.

See the paint outs?

 

This morning Cosco Shipping Peony–the first of its class–arrived just before adequate light for photos.  I hope some one gets photos during its first sixth boro stay.

And once the boxes leave the ULCS, they go into the hinterland on steel rails or–less efficiently–on a single chassis pulled by a tractor.

These statistics are quickly becoming obsolete.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

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