You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘CMA CGM Nerval’ tag.

The photo below I took on January 19, 2017.  What does it possibly have to do with July 4, 2021?

Do you recall the questions at the end of this post from not quite a month ago?

I quote from the Moran FB page:  “Lady Liberty’s ‘Little Sister’ departed France on June 23rd, taking the same route that the original statue once took.  The nine-foot replica was carried onboard the French vessel CMA CGM Nerval, and arrived in Port Elizabeth, New Jersey, where she was met by CMA CGM’s North America President, Ed Aldridge, the French Ambassador, Philippe Etienne, and New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy. She will be displayed on Ellis Island for Independence Day, and then she will head down to Washington, DC for Bastille Day, which is on July 14th.”

So I’m guessing the “Little Sister’ will travel down to DC by truck, return here by truck, and then be loaded aboard another container ship.  I hope they announce which vessel carries this cargo.

The photo below from July 4, 2012 is especially bittersweet since Pegasus is no longer.   Here are my illuminations aka skyrockets posts, and no, I won’t be among the throngs around the East River tonight . . . . too many people.

Hip hip 245!!

All photos, WVD.

January, once every four years, involves a formality that we mark today.  Inaugurate has a strange derivation, you figure it out.  With this post, I’m in no way intending to divine futures.  Really it’s just sets of photos taken four years apart. 

Ice and lightship yacht Nantucket floated in the harbor in mid January 2009. Do you remember what else was literally in the harbor?

Weeks tugs stood by ready to move a barge underneath the airplane when Weeks 533 lifted the Airbus 320 from harbor waters that had cushioned its fall . . . twelve years ago. 

Next inauguration day, 2013, I watched fishermen drag clams from the bottom of Gravesend Bay.

Rebel, destined not to run much longer, pushed a barge across the Upper Bay with an incomplete WTC beyond.  Many more details had not yet sprouted on the Manhattan skyline.

Mid January 2017 . . . CMA CGM Nerval headed for the port with Thomas J. Brown off its starboard.  Here‘s what I wrote about this photo and others exactly four years ago.

Nerval still needed to make its way under the yet-to-be completed raising of the Bayonne Bridge, assisted by JRT Moran.  This view was quite different in mid January 2017.   As of today, this container ship in on the Mediterranean on a voyage between Turkey and Morocco.

All photos, WVD, taken in mid January at four-year intervals.  Nothing should be read into the choice of photos.  Sorry I have no photos from January 20, 2005, because back then I didn’t take as many photos, and four years before that, I was still using a film camera, took fewer photos in a year than now I do on certain days, and that skyline above was very different.

My inaugural event . . .  cleaning my desk, my office, and my kitchen.   If you’re looking for an activity, something might need cleaning. Laundry?   Yup, work after work.  All inaugurations call for clean ups.

And if you want to buy that lightship yacht above, here‘s the info.

 

I’d put Orsula down as saltie, an ocean-going vessel of dimensions that allow her to travel deep freshwater inland, here a few days after the longest day of 2017 as far inland as Duluth; that’s 2000 miles from the Ocean.  In fact, here she’s headed for Europe, likely with a cargo of grain.  Last year, I caught her upbound just above Montreal.

Calling Atlantic Olive a saltie might be disputed, since here she’s departing the saltwater of NYC for the saltwater of the sea.  Olives can be salty, and maybe there needs to be a term for vessels that never leave saltwater . . .  other than ocean-going.

Ditto Onxy Arrow.  But since part of the goal of this post is to illustrate the variety of ocean-going vessels, behold a RORO. As cargo, there might be cars, trucks, army tanks, construction equipment, or anything else that can get itself aboard of its own power.  You might remember this previous post involving Onyx Arrow.

Marc Levinson’s The Box provides a good introduction to this relatively new shipping concept.

The sixth boro sees a lot of tankers and

container ships.

ACL offers the latest design in CONRO vessels, accommodating both containerized and RORO cargo.

Some bulk carriers have self-unloading gear.

Some otherwise obsolete break bulk cargo ships are adaptively repurposed as training vessels. 

Size is key to true salties being able transport far into the interior of North America via the Saint Lawrence Seaway locks.

This is not a cargo vessel, or as Magritte might have said, “Ceci n’est pas un cargo.”

Some CONRO vessels have the bridge forward, almost as an adaptation of a classic laker design.

And to operate in cold seas, hulls have special design and material modifications.

And at risk of making this a baker’s dozen, I have to add Orange Ocean, great name for a transporter of my favorite fluid.  Of course, this blogger cherishes other fluids as well, such as those once transported by the likes of Angelo Petri, as seen here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this as just 12 of many  more types.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

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Some of you know the dimensions of these two vessels, so for you all who don’t, I’m not saying for now.

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Some of the CMA CGM ships are named for French writers; Nerval is an interesting one because of a story–fake or not–about him and his pet lobster.  You mean it’s odd to have a lobster as a pet?

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The tug--T. J. Brown–dates from 1962 and is 60′ x 18.8′  CMA CGM Nerval is relatively small as container ships go these days:  984′ x 131.’

And Gérard de Nerval and his lobster, here’s the story;  he rescued it from the pot. The sixth boro and all its bulkheads have a billion oyster project,  meow man’s beautifications, and maybe it’s time for a NYNJ Nerval to enhance the harbor and its promenades with lobsterloverlanes.  By the way,  I’ve seen animals walking through Penn Station and local transit hubs, but so far, no lobsters.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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