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According to PANYNJ stats, May 2021 saw 396,417 loaded teus arrive in the sixth boro;  May 2020 saw 266,004!    That is an increase of 49%.  Exports of loaded teus in May this year totaled 134,458 versus 95,462 last year, an increase if 40.8%.  So the port is  . . . busy.  So as I’ve done before, I offer a sampling of the ships involved in the moving teus, i.e., container ships.

Check out OOCL Europe, head on . . . launched in 2006, with her 8063 teu capacity.

As you know, CMA CGM Marco Polo  [yes, I missed it] has been the largest container ship to call in port of NYNJ to date, recently she called in Laem Chabang and Vung Tau, and I’ll let you guess where those megaports are.

Ikaria, 2002, and 4492 teu, is the smallest box ship in this batch.   In 1999, I was not blogging about the port, but the record shows the largest container ship in the world then carried 6200 teu. 

There’s not much view of either the box ship, CMA CGM Brazil or the tanker, but check out the bow wave compared with the small trawler just beyond. Of course, foreshortening is involved and the 30+- trawler was in no danger.

CMA CGM Brazil, pictured here, is the newest in this batch, launched in 2020 and has the capacity of 15128 teu.

MSC Tavvishi is the oldest, from 2000, with a 5468 teu capacity.  Launched in 2000, she was not that much smaller than the largest in the world at that time.

And RDO Fortune, a 2012 launch with a 5033 teu capacity

came into the sixth boro appearing to be entirely empty.  Might that be to pick up empty boxes?

All photos, WVD.

Laem Chabang and Vung Tau are ports in Thailand and Vietnam, respectively.

 

See the draft numbers? Here‘s a good definition of and discussion of their usages.  I pay attention to these just because I’m a curious layperson. These appear in multiple locations around the hull because draft varies longitudinally. The markings here I’ve read near the stern, as below, or the bow.

This bulk carrier had discharged most of its load and not yet ballasted itself for sailing.  The froth forward of the draft numbers comes from the cooling system.  The two staples (or are they padeyes?) would be useful in the case of propeller work or other underwater repairs near the stern of the vessel. All those other numbers indicate info about the interior structure of the vessel, and are above my current paygrade. 

The draft markings I read as 9.2.  Some of you might read this with more nuance.  These marks differ from payload to payload and are also used to measure air draft.

I’d read this as 10.8.

I read this as 11.

This starboard bow marking I’d call at 11.3.  With this vessel underway, notice the physics causing the water to flow over the bulb and up the knife edge.

This . . .12.6.

Lots of info here, but the draft makings here say 13.4.  The 90t on the recessed shell bitt indicates how much towing pressure this is capable of.  The G and L on the load line disk indicates the Germanischer Lloyd classification society;  an A and B here would mean American Bureau of Shipping

Draft here looks like 14.4.  The disk with four spokes indicates the location of the thruster. 

I digress, but Hyundai Speed has two bow thrusters.  Note also the info on the size of the bulb.

Note that two sets of draft markings (and two staples) here. 

I read this as 14.4.

So how about this one?  Is it the deepest of all?

Actually, Double Skin 509A has the least draft.  This is feet and would convert to about a 5.2 on the same scale as the others shown above.  Well . . .  we have resisted much use of metric measures.

All photos, WVD, who alone is responsible for any errors here. For much more on ship classification societies, click here.

Remember the post on the CMA CGM 14414s?  How about the Wall of New York?

Below you are looking at 25,000 teu on the Maersk PLUS the CMA CGM vessels, Maersk 10k and CMA CGM 15k,

making this the largest ULCV yet to call in the sixth boro, CMA CGM BrazilBrazil came off the ways earlier this year.  The rest of the series will carry names including CMA CGM Argentina, Mexico, Panama, and ChileDoes Brazil have the special scrubbers?  When will LNG catch on as fuel?

Hayward must have been the spectator vessel, but I didn’t get my invitation.

Maybe someone can opine on why James D. provided the tow moving astern?  My supposition is that this configuration places the wheels farthest ahead of the tow, providing the dynamic equivalent of a longer lever, but that’s only a supposition.

 

 

James D. and Kirby worked in tandem, as opposite ends of the ship.

If my math is correct, 15,000 teus, if lined up end to end, would make 56.8 miles of containers.  Big ship.

All photos, WVD, who wonders what is in all those boxes and of all that, what could not be made or grown in this country.

If you didn’t see her arrive, maybe you can catch her when she exits.

 

 

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