You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘CMA CGM Argentina’ tag.

Technological marvel and global supply chains spawned by the deindustrialization of this country go hand in hand with these huge vessels.  CMA CGM J. Adams comes in with +14,000 teu, a peak capacity reached in August 2017 when her sister vessel T. Roosevelt arrived first. 

That’s 1202′ x 166′ and running deep. 

Tokyo Triumph comes in slightly smaller, 13,870 teu and 1197′ x 168′.

CMA CGM Argentina brings in +15,000 teu on her 1200′ x 167′.

Monaco Bridge carries in 13900 teu on a 1197′ x 168′.

Wanna guess for OOCL Chongqing?

Her 1202′ x 158′ dimensions transport 13,208 teus.

CMA CGM Alexander von Humboldt comes in at the top, +16,000 teu on dimensions of 1299′ x 177′.

That puts her in the class with CMA CGM’s Marco Polo and Jules Verne as the largest trio to call in the sixth boro so far.  She’s been here before, I believe, but this is my first time to see her.  

These ULVCs are sometimes referred to as CMA CGM’s Explorer class box boats.  If you’re unfamiliar with the the name, Von Humboldt surely deserves to be grouped with Polo and Verne.  See his bio here.

USACE Dobrin followed the ULCV around Bergen Point.

And then, there’s the case of Ever Forward, shown here in a photo shared by Captain Nemo. Ever Forward is the newest of the ULCVs in this post, carrying 11,850 teus on dimensions of 1096′ x 157′.  Ever Frustrated is likely how her owners, crew, and recipients of cargo must now feel.   Ever Forward would have called in NYC this past week, as have her sisters of the Ever F class. 

All photos except Ever Forward, WVD, who is responsible for any errors of fact. 

Back to historical Barge Canal photos tomorrow, but today I’m back in the boros, where the birds are singing in the sunny low   

60s!  Because I’ve been inland, all photos come from very recent archives, like Balsa 85, a small general cargo carrying a bulk cargo of sugar in the holds of her petite 348′ x 62′ hull.

Navig8 Perseverance could not be more different:  a crude oil tanker 817′ x 144′, carrying oil from somewhere on one planet earther.

STI Brooklyn is a Panamax oil/chemical tanker, 600′ x105′.  Want more STI (Scorpion Tankers Inc.) names?  Click here.

Stena Impulse has exactly the same dimensions as STI Brooklyn, but a very different superstructure. 

Here and here are other Stena Imp…. tankers.

Steam Atlantic, nice name, is smaller:  482′ x 79′.  Her sister vessel Stream Pacific can be found here.

Suddenly ships and containers marked Wan Hai are appearing.

Wan Hai 301, 984′ x 105′, follow the nomenclature pattern this blog does.  Numbers in lists may not be elegant, but they are effective.

And among the largest container ships in the boro, it’s

CMA CGM Argentina, measuring in at 1200′ x 167′ and some change. 

All photos, WVD, from my oceanic archives and on the first real day of winterspring.

 

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

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