You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Catherine Moran’ tag.

This batch of photos is from 1958 from Steve, who has shared photos for at least 17 posts, and maybe more. I’m grateful Steve provides the captioning, because I was in second grade at the time.  Steve explains:  “I was just over 10 years old, and although being brought up on the water on my grandfather’s old 40’ cabin cruiser, I had never been on a tugboat—yet. When I came home from school at lunchtime, my mother told me to come home from school quickly at the end of the day so that I could get my homework done . . . because my aunt was picking me and my father up  to meet my uncle, Capt. Bob Munoz, on his tugboat to do a special job.”  More of that narrative follows at the end of this post.

Below, from that day, with Steve’s comments in quotes: “Diana L Moran alongside USS Franklin D. Roosevelt …”

I gather from records that the 1945-launched carrier had just completed a refit and overhaul at the time.   Diane L was Jakobson built and two years old at this time. If you’re not familiar with the sixth boro, that’s the Williamsburg Bridge and in the distance to the north, the Empire State Building.

Dalzellera pulling USS FDR-CV42-with assistance from Catherine Moran and Dalzellaird.”

This Catherine Moran, built in 1939, was mentioned in relation to Erie Canal work here, and may still be working as Sherry D in Napa CA.

Dalzellera pulling with assistance from Catherine Moran, Dalzellaird, and Fred B Dalzell.”

“Taken from the stern of Dalzellera alongside USS FDR.”

“USS Enterprise  (CV-6) at  Brooklyn Navy Yard.”

She participated in more major battles in WW2 than any other USN vessel.    Efforts by NYS to purchase and turn her into a memorial were unsuccessful.  Soon after Steve took these photos, she was sold for scrap, done subsequently at Kearny NJ.

“USS Independence (CV-62) at Brooklyn under construction.”

For this carrier as I saw her in 2010 in Bremerton WA, go to the end of this post.  In March 2017, she was towed out of Bremerton, 16000 miles around Cape Horn to be scrapped in Texas, which was completed in early 2019.  Anyone know who did this tow?

Barbara Moran in East River, heading east.”

This was the 1949, not the 1948, boat by that name.

Steve gave me a long version of his account of the day, but I’ve taken liberty to abridge it.  “Uncle Bob greeted us as we boarded the Dalzell Towing Company’s Dalzellera, flagship of the Dalzell fleet and converted from steam to diesel only 5 years earlier, was previously the Jersey Central RR steam tug Bethlehem. Dalzellera had a 1750hp diesel engine, a surplus WW II submarine engine coupled to a new unique drive system for NY harbor–a controllable pitch propeller.   When Dalzell was purchased by McAllister in 1965, she was renamed D. E. McAllister.

But that day our special job happened to be at the New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn Navy Yard, helping move the aircraft carrier USS FDR from its slip into the East River,  downriver,  and then  into the graving dock. It was a dead ship,  968’ long, 45,000 tons, in port for overhaul and repairs. The time for this move was selected to take advantage of the slack water in the early evening.  Dalzell had the contract with the US Navy to move the ship, but did not have enough of its own tugs available to do the job alone. Hence,  tugs from McAllister, Bronx Towing, Red Star, and Moran were also involved, for a total of 13 tugs.

Uncle Bob was the mate on the Dalzellera, but for this job he was one of several pilots assigned to control and monitor the movement of the ship and the tugs assisting the carrier. He was stationed up on the port bow on the flight deck.

Having the ship on a hawser allowed a unique vantage point as seen in the pictures.  And, it was uneventful. I was on the port side of the main deck with everyone else away from the after deck, just in case the line snapped. Then it happened. BANG!  I watched the line part and jump up toward the carrier’s bow. No one was on the after deck, so no one was hurt, no damage done.  Another line was lowered and the towing continued like nothing ever happened. As we got closer to the dock, Carol Moran got too close to one of FDR‘s overhangs on the port side and destroyed her mast, which fell onto her deck. Shortly afterwards the tug was relieved to allow it to head back to the yard before dark, since her mast lights were out.

Dalzellera was relieved of hawser duty just before the ship’s bow entered the graving dock and helped continue the push into the dock while the yard personnel started getting lines up to the ship to guide it into position. It was dusk when the task was finished. We picked up Bob at the end of the pier and headed back to our base.  After this day I was hooked on tugs.”

Thanks much, Steve.  As with the Enterprise, efforts by NYS to purchase USS FDR and turn her into a memorial were unsuccessful, and she was scrapped in Kearny NJ in 1978. Some photos of that last trip to the scrapyard can be found here.

For more tugboats of this decade, click here.

Finally, here’s USS Independence as I saw her in 2010 in Bremerton WA.

 

Here‘s the post that prompts this one.  The Ships of the Sea model exhibit in the William Scarborough House by far exceeded my expectations.  Reaction to one of my Virtual Tour of the Erie Canal posts suggests I do this post.  Someone could likely confirm the date of this unattributed photo.  I can tell you the place . . . lock E-12, upbound. *

I believe this is the 1939 Sheila Moran.

If you read Birk’s summary of the Sheila, she became the Catherine in 1947, right after Moran acquired her,  and worked by that name until 1960. Might this have been Sheila‘s first and maybe only trip up?  I’d love to know how many tug/fuel barge units Moran operated on the canal.  Here’s a model I saw in the H. Lee White Maritime Museum a few years ago of her as Catherine.  Given her location in the canal corridor, her USN name might have been more appropriate, Canasetego.

Here’s the label that goes with the model.

Re-reading this, I decided to look up William H. Leighton, the model maker.  Unfortunately, Mr. Leighton died in 2017.

I’m putting this post up to follow on yesterday’s end of the first of two virtual Erie Canal tours.  I’m hoping to hear from more folks who were paying attention to canal traffic long before I was. Maybe someone from the H. Lee White?   The painful irony for me is that I lived near the canal from the mid-1950s until the late 1960s, but somehow my eyes were directed elsewhere until the late 1990s, when I first traveled on it.

*Group sourcing . . . it’s a thing!  Four different readers have already corrected me.  Thx all.   It’s lock E-8 and the unit’s downbound.  Furthermore, credit goes to the Gayer Collection, another great source for vintage NYS photos.

 

I’m reprising this from Troy, and it’s Lisa Ann.  I believe she’s 2012 built.

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Governor Roosevelt is almost a century older, and wears 1928 on her name board now. This is Marcy NY, an Oneida County town between Utica and Rome.

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Also at Lock E20, here’s a clutch of boats and floats including BB152, an unidentified and in the process of being repainted tender, a dredge barge, and BB 142.

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Tug Erie is there too. Anyone know when tug Erie was built?

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Farther along is 1932 tug Seneca, formerly of the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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Inside the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego, here’s a model of a Catherine Moran.

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Here’s what the label said, but according to birk’s site, she’s still alive and well under the assumed name of  Sherry D.   Anyone have photos of Sherry D out in the SF Bay area?

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On the freshwater sea called Lake Ontario, it’s another tugboat from 1928, Karl E. Luedtke.

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Tucked away in Silo City of Buffalo, it’s Daniel Joncaire II, about a year old.

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In the Outer Harbor of Cleveland, it’s 1954 Duluth and fleet mate

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1956 William C. Gaynor.

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And here approaching the south end of the Detroit river, it’s 1982 tug Michigan pushing barge Great Lakes.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Know the location?

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I took it from a southernmost point in the Bronx looking eastward toward North Brother Island . . . the brick chimney to the right.  I can’t identify either the Weeks tug or the current usage of the red-and-white striped stack to the left.

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What caught my attention was the pink breast cancer awareness ribbon on the front of the house of Mediterranean Sea.

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By the time I got back to the sixth boro, the pink “M” on Moran tugs was once again white.  The only photo of a Moran tug I managed in the whole month of October was the one below, a photo of a photo of a Catherine Moran in the lobby of a restaurant in Lockport.  Label says . . . as you can read it . . . “Lockport 1939.”  Would this have been the vessel built by Neafie & Levy in 1904?

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As to the pink ribbon, I was happy to see it.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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