You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Catherine C. Miller’ tag.

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

I’m not disparaging, but my first thought was “just another” Vane tug heading across the bow, until

we passed and I noticed it was Charleston, which I believe is Vane’s newest tug in the sixth boro.

The new “ubiquitous” vessels on the sixth boro waterways move containerized trash.  Pathfinder is one of the tugboats assigned to this duty.   Covanta first got the contract for this business in 2013, and my first knowledge of these barges was here.

Two different generations of McAllister tugboats headed out recently, Capt. Brian A. and

Ellen.   Launched a half century apart and having a difference of almost 3000 hp, they are both working daily assisting ships in the harbor.

Janet D is a mere five years old and works in marine construction, working for the aptly named Construction and Marine Equipment Co.

Franklin Reinauer was built and christened by that name in 1984.

It appears to me here that Linda L. Miller, the truckable tug, is the prime mover, pushing Catherine C. Miller.  Click to enlarge the photo and you’ll see a handsome spread of Manhattan architecture, sans the peaks.

And let’s conclude with Mister Jim, who back in 2016 did not have the gray/red livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who missed the return of Atlantic Enterprise this morning, back from the work in Georgia.

You can find the first eight installments here.

Little C is a relatively seldom seen harbor tug

dedicated to Warren George projects.

Coal?

Navigator these days has been pushing coal around the harbor, coal as I understand it thanks to ws–a frequent commenter here–that

was previously intended as fuel to the now-retired Hudson Generation Station.

Transport of some of the coal out of the sixth boro has been performed by SBI Jive;  from here, the vessel’s traveled to Rotterdam, then Ust-Luga on the Baltic.

Photos by Will Van Dorp; thanks to ws for following the coal.

As to SBI Jive, she has fleet mates with gambolling names like SBI Macarena, SBI Swing, SBI Zumba, SBI Reggae, SBI Mazurka, SBI Samba, SBI Capoeira . . . and more.

As I went to one of my locations Thursday, I saw this tow headed up the Upper Bay toward Bayonne, and lamented being too late.  I knew it was one of the new DSNY garbage cranes recently being deployed to new marine transfer stations in Manhattan & SW Brooklyn…

Panning slightly to the right, a group on Miller’s Launch boats were attending Afrodite . . .

Panning more than 90 degrees over past the VZ Bridge, I noticed a crane and some tugs over in the direction of Coney Island . . .

Shortly thereafter, I realized the sanitation cranes were returning . . . outbound, moved by Catherine C. Miller.

The next day, from the same vantage point, I noticed two large tugs in Gravesend Bay, one less familiar than the Moran tug.

The unusual stacks identified it immediately . . . Lauren Foss, which I had not seen since 2014, three and a half years ago here….  By the way, notice the ferris wheel and roller coaster on the skyline of Coney Island?

If you’re new to reading this blog, the high point of summer in the sixth boro shoreside for me is the first day, because it brings the mermaids ashore, a whole series of posts about which you can find here . . .

But back to Lauren Foss, a large oceangoing tug used for large barges.  RORO barge American Trader , 400′ x 105′ qualifies as a large barge, although some of the Crowley container barges are larger as seen here and here.

Click here for the specs on the 8200 hp Lauren Foss.

CCA . . . here’s info on this busy but mostly invisible corporation that dates back to the Reagan era.

Here’s the scoop on McLaren Engineering.

 

The sixth boro is truly the part of NYC that never sleeps.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Happy 4th of July!  Here’s the first post by this title with a story of what John Adams wrote Abigail around this time 241 years ago.

So why do we celebrate this day?  Uh . . . the British surrendered?  It marks the first battle for independence?

DDG-55 Stout  (photo taken May 20, 2015)

We got freedom to say what we want, pray to whomever we choose, buy as many guns as we want, refuse to be unreasonably searched, charged too much bail, have access to lawyers in court, and things like that?

The founders of the US signed the Declaration of Independence?

Nope!  Nope, nope.  None of those is correct.  The British didn’t surrender for another 6 years and didn’t vacate their occupation force from the sixth boro–the only boro then–until 1783.  The Constitution wasn’t written for another decade and some!!

Here’s a good quick “not fake” read for today called “9 Things You May Not Know About the  Declaration of Independence.”

I’ll get back to that . .  but what is that military gray ship over there trying to camouflage itself against Staten Island ferry orange?  I took the rest of these photos about 24 hours ago . . .   The flag at the stern is NOT US…

It’s French.  So maybe they’re here to help us  celebrate the contributions of Rochambeau, DeGrasse. and Lafayette?

Nope, they helped after 1776 . . ..  In fact the Alliance had not even existed yet for a few years .  . .

Well, maybe the crew of the French L 9032 is here to ride the NYWheel?

Nope.  That’s in some turmoil.

See the billboard there?  Maybe they’re here for “the lowest cost health plan?”

Maybe they’re here for Macy’s !!?  Rowland Hussey Macy WAS a sailor, after all;  the red Macy’s logo star was the tattoo he wore on his hand . . .

 

Actually  I have NO idea why FS Dumont D’Urville docked over at the old homeport yesterday . . .  maybe someone can illuminate us . . .?

But to get back to 4th July . . . here was the response of George III–the accused– to the Declaration:  I’d never read it until now and it’s short and precious and defensive!!

Here’s another 4 July tugster post from the archives . . .  And if you still have time to read, here are “Six things you (probably) didn’t know about the 4th July. . . .”  And the flag of that year?  Maybe here.  And the drink of choice to fete the day back then . . .?  Well, it was not beer or rum.  Rick Spilman has it here.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who offers another link to the big document of the day here, and wishes you a happy independence day.

 

Bravo to the organizers and participants of the 2015 NYC race.  It starts with a muster…

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L to r:  Catherine Miller, Robert E. McAllister, Eric R. Thornton, Mister T, Buchanan 1, and Buchanan 12

which looks  different as you shift perspective.

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Add Red Hook and Sarah Ann, with a jet ski for scale.

 

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Add Thomas Witte.

 

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Take a close up on Mister T with John J. Harvey in the distance.

It’s great to see race newcomers like Sea Scout Ship 243 out of Rahway NJ, and

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Patricia.

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By this point, some boats like Robert E. McAllister start to get impatient.

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Muster then turns into a procession,  filing straight toward the starting line and

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showing the colors

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as some newcomers catch up.

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James William used to be a Moran boat.

Next stage . . . it’s the tension on the starting line, feet digging into the starting blocks and muscles tensing, sort of.

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There are 11 boats here, including Margot pushing a set of rock barges and not racing.

They’re off!

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and water starts to cascade away from the bows…

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froth by the ton.

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But when the quick minutes of the race have elapsed, the first boat down the course is the impatient Robert E. McAllister.

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And almost as in a triathlon, the dash down the course changes and the pushing starts.

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All manner of paired struggle ensues.

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And we need to leave.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to Bjoern and crew for my ride.

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The race may last for less than 10 minutes for (most) boats, but each participant spends hours before and after.  Here, using the power of thousands of conceptual horses and one very real donkey, all four vessels in Miller contingent make their way upriver.

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At Pier 66, crew on deck and crew below start them up.

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Lady B (read her interesting history here and here, the latter explaining that the “B” stands for either “Benazir” or Bhutto.”

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For boats that arrive on the scene early, Red Hook may have come straight from a job delivering bunker to Norwegian Breakaway, there’s time for what might look like lollygagging, and

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(in these next two shots from William Hyman) saluting the spectators or just

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being seen.  Does Seagus have another name?

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But it’s also getting acquainted time.

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Some regulars didn’t show, and other vessels arrived that I’d never seen before.

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I had to look up South River Rescue Squad attending the Great North River race . . .

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Somewhere in the attractively dressed race day crew on Jake-boat Resolute are two of the principals of tugboatinformation.com . . .  hi Birk and Craig, as well as the force majeure aka Rod behind Narragansett Bay Shipping.

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This kayaker stays well out of the stream.

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The white bowstriped vessel–Lt. Michael P. Murphy– in the distance won the prize for persistence, finishing the course in a historic half an hour . . . spending most of that time doing a mid-race-course onboard repair.

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Despite forecasts of storms–and rain north of the GW Bridge–the only lightning I saw was here and

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thunder from the crowds on the piers.  That’s the intrepid bowsprite showing us her drawing/painting arm.

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Spectators took advantage of any platform.

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More soon.   Thanks to William Hyman for his fotos, especially the one of an exuberant W. O. Decker, which I featured hard at work using Seth Tane fotos from over 30 years ago here.  Click here for John Huntington’s superb fotos from a wet place in the race . . ..

Again, my hat’s off to all who must work on Labor Day, including my son, who always works holidays for the higher hourly rate.  And if you’re inclined, read what Paul Krugman has to say about Labor Day.

All hype . . . like Camping and others . . . just to mention recent hoaxes.

Nevertheless, I made my rounds.  High winds chill to the bone but no doomsday out here . . . Brian Nicholas pushed recycling into the Kills,

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Catherine Miller moved semis beyond the end of the bridge,

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Nomad and Alpine Alaska waited inside the Narrows,

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as did Mount Karavawhich first appeared here almost brand-new over five years ago.

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Padre Island anchored off the BAT, taking time off from vacuuming the channels south of the Narrows.

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Michigan Service headed for the Kills.

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OOCL Kuala Lumpur shifted  containers.

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Given the hype about the apocalypse, I kept eyes wide open for debris and found some, although this is long-planned and controlled demolition.

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USCG made their own rounds.

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Six years ago, I put up this winter solstice post, led off by this fine foto  . . . compliments of Richard Wonder . . .  of an elegant John B. Caddell, recently lifted off a place where floating things should never go.  And speaking of vessels finding themselves in places that should remain off limits, check out this and this article about a tanker bottomed out on the upper Hudson.   “Bakken crude”    . . . that’s a term I’ve not heard before.    If anyone upriver has fotos to share, please get in touch.

I’ve headed into a different part of the sixth boro each of the past three days . . . today was the North River . . .  passenger terminal, since

three cruise ships came in around 0700 hrs . . . Gem and Brilliance, shown here, as well as Caribbean Princess, still outside the Narrows when this screenshot was taken. John J Marchi is a ferry, and I’ve not gotten confirmation it carried passengers.  Anyone ride a Staten Island ferry today?  And as of 1830 hrs, all have again departed.  Notice the icon for Glory Express in the screen grab below?  I believe this is the 2-million-barrel tanker referenced in this article. It’s been outside the Lower Bay for a few days now.

Cruise ship passengers debarking and others boarding in midTown . . . along with closed midTown streets closed because of this bent crane AND

disrupted LIRR and subways . . . made for lots of surly folks, if not a zombie apocalypse then at least an invasion of the cheeriness snatchers.  For outatowners, on a normal day, eachtown listed on this Long Island Railroad schedule board would have several departure times listed.

Jersey City and Hoboken, coastal NJ cities across the river from midTown, have experienced their share of disruption.  Here Catherine Miller delivers a crane barge northbound as a helicopter (National Guard?) flies to the south.

Vicki M moves another barge near the Hoboken ferry terminal, then

as Lynx moves a load of generators, loaders,  and other equipment (not sure what some of  it is),

Vicki M plays mobile thruster there before

moving southward to play same role with Jay Michael.

Overhead . . . might Janet Napolitano be in that chopper?

Many thanks to Tom Rinaldi for sending along this link of ferry Binghamton post-Sandy.  Thanks, Tom.  Check out Tom’s site here.

For an NYTimes-moderated debate on post-Sandy policy, click here.  One of the debaters–Philip Orton, research scientist at Stevens–does the SeaAndSkyNY blog.

Unrelated:  Kirby’s Siberian Sea in Halifax here.

B. Franklin Reinauer made its inaugural visit to the sixth boro this week.  Birk Thomas caught this shot.  I featured it last month at splash here.

The same day, Capt. Jason (1982) breezed through the harbor, a first glimpse for me.  I have not much more info.

Gulf Dawn appeared here.

And regulars include Catherine Miller,

Laura K. Moran,

Lucy Reinauer,

Evening Mist sailing here through golden evening sheen,

and Sassafras paralleling a container ship.

Except for the foto by Birk, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  An intriguing and troubling story from gCaptain about a captain in prison in Panama.  Maas Trader called in Red Hook just over two years ago.

 

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