You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Capt. Brian A. McAllister’ tag.

Here goes another 3-fer, three cargo vessels making their way again through the KVK simultaneously.  JRT here at dawn assists orange juice carrier Orange Blossom 2 through the ConHook Range.

Jonathan C passes in front of them, returning from assisting another vessel now bound for sea.

Right behind the juice carrier is a box ship.

 

As the juice ship nears midpoint in the KVK, notice a RORO rounding Bergen Point at the west end of the KVK.

As I said, congestion . ..   that’s routine.  Kimberly travels along the starboard bow of the RORO,

Meanwhile, that box ship mentioned earlier has Eric on port

and Capt Brian A. at the stern.

Glovis Safety . . . headed for Philly and as of this moment is midAtlantic on its way to Zeebrugge.

 

As I said . . .   skillful mariners make a congested waterway seem just routine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Here are previous posts, and yes, it’s twelve o’clock somewhere . . . which means POSTING Time.

What would be your guess for the nationality of the mariner on the tug?  How about the mariners on the ship?

I’ll let you ponder a clue that might be here.

It’s like spotting a unicorn to see a US-flagged tanker in the sixth boro.

She’s 2009 NASSCO built.

I can’t say much else about her, but it was good to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Here’s a fact I stumbled on yesterday:  although there are ships and boats named for former presidents on the US, can you name one that’s namesake for two US presidents?  Answer is here.

Beyond Capt. Brian . . .

Stena Penguin prepares to exit the KVK for the Upper Bay and up to the Saint Lawrence.

Anchored in the Upper Bay, it’s Stenaweco Elegance and

Venus R. now both away south . . ..

Eric McAllister here passes Harbour First, and later

escorts in RHL Agilitas.

Meanwhile crude oil tanker Alpine Confidence, somewhat down by the bow, turns in the tide just inside the Narrows.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who always finds change in the sixth boro, whether it be every day or every decennial.

By the way, see Tugster Tower in the distance . . .  somewhere out there in the haze.

 

“Leaning out” is the layperson term that comes to mind, but I’m supposing a technical and standardized term exists:  indirect towing.

Let’s watch the evolution with Capt. Brian and OOCL Berlin. At 12:01, the line is slack.

12:02. As the tow approaches Bergen Point, line is tightened and

by 12:04, the line lengthened, and the tug appears to be headed in a diametrically opposite direction, in spite of OOCL Berlin‘s much larger mass.

Capt. Brian is now using the hull as a brake.

 

Three other tugs are working alongside the ship.

A different day, Capt. Brian is working on Gjertrud Maersk using the same technique.

 

 

All photos and conjecture on the language by Will Van Dorp.   Here’s one of my sources.  I hope someone corrects or confirms my understanding here.

 

Faber Park aka the swimming pool has become one of my favorite places to watch the behemoths pass.The next set of photos I took in about 10 minutes.

I’m in awe of the skills involved . . . navigation and communication.

This is a tight turn.

x

Four tugboats–Ellen, Rowan, Capt. Brian, and Eric–keep it in the channel and the track such that two of these ships can negotiate the turn.

 

And they make it look routine.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A friend once took this photo of a wall in San Francisco.  And Manhattan has this street called Wall that was quite ineffective in keeping the originals of Mannahatta out.

But as you can see from the photo below, Manhattan today is a walled city, with a wall made of lego-colored boxes.

[And this is just a space digression so that

 

you can’t see the next photo

 

on your screen.

 

There are more photos below.

 

I wouldn’t want you to make sense of the first photo

 

right away.

OK, enough, with

 

the digression.]

 

Here’s the rest of that shot, two Maersk ships passing just north of the VZ Bridge.

All these photos were taken within a total of less than two minutes

Alex sees Maersk Shenzhen out, then will likely do a 180 and assist Capt. Brian seeing Gunhilde Maersk into the KVK.

And now I have a question:  NYMaritime defines ULCVs and SULCVs (super ultralarge container vessel) basically as follows:  anything larger than 997′ and 140′ beam is considered a ULCV, and anything with beam in excess of 159′ is a SULCV.  Vessel traffic describes ships of Gunhilde‘s class as SULCV but does not do so for Shenzhen.  But now guess the relative dimensions of these two vessels.

Maersk Shenzhen  1062′ x 157’*  10,000 teu.  Previously she was Hyundai Pluto. 

Gunhilde Maersk  1204′ x 138′ *   7000 teu.

Is there some mistake here?

*These numbers come from shipspotting.com.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Nineteen boxes wide!

And stacked higher behind the bridge than in front of it.

It was a windy day, and Alex did her part to ensure she rounded the bend.

Eric on the starboard bow was there if needed to thrust the bow within the channel.

And at the opposite stern, Capt. Brian A.  could do what was needed

to make this rounding of Bergen Point

just routine, as Maersk Shenzhen made a few more turns before setting a course across the Atlantic directly for Suez and points beyond.  I caught her in port earlier as Hyundai Pluto, sister of Jupiter.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous installments of this title all involved McAllister boats as well.

 

Did you hear about Peak Pegasus, the vessel racing to get US soybeans into China before retaliatory 25% tariffs are slapped on?  More on Peak Pegasus at the end of this post.

Well, these two container ship had no need to hurry into the sixth boro, yet here’s something I’ve never seen before . . . two container ships entering the Narrows in quite close succession.

Obviously the passage accommodates all, but still . . . a new sight for me, the reason I return here again and again.

See QM2 in the distance to the right?  I caught her first arrival here 11 years ago.  Dawn was too late for me to catch it.  That ominous sky got me thinking . . . storm clouds.  Locally I was just concerned about getting spots on my lens.  But then I thought about the story of Peak Pegasus, the impending trade war.  I could see those as storm clouds, and shipping . . . this is a front line, like every seaport in the US.

Take the value of all the imported cargo on Maersk Buton and

add to it the value of whatever’s on OOCL Berlin . . . and every other ship entering a US port for the foreseeable future and add the product of that and  .25 . . . the sum’s rising.  Ditto  . . . whatever is on Bomar Caen–headed for Colombia–might just be less attractive if .25 gets added to the price of those goods.  Maybe Colombia is not affected.

I’m by no means an expert in much, and please educate me if I’m wrong, but these storm clouds seemed appropriate this morning.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who first read the name of the Maersk ship as butoh, which would have been much more interesting.

Peak Pegasus plowed at top speed to make port, but  . . . she failed.  More here.   Here’s a story from the same vessel from a few months back.

There’s an expression about the excitement of watching paint dry.  Recording a large construction project is about as interesting unless you do a form of time lapse, which I’ve inadvertently done with the Bayonne Bridge. Change is happening all over the city, but here’s what I’ve watched since way before the raising began.

In August 2017, I rode over the new span for the first time.

 

I next got down to look what was happening at the Bridge in December,  the 16th.

Here’s January.  Notice above the old lower roadbed still spanned to the third arches inside Bayonne, and below, three arches (I’ll call them 4–6) remained without roadbed.

That’s Doris Moran, and notice that #6 arch has seen some erosive work.

In mid-February, #6 arch is gone, and work is happening

(here’s a closeup) on #5.

By 24 April, #4 is gone and #3 previously supporting a roadbed is now “freestanding”, as Joyce passes.

And on May 10, roadbed only linked the grid box with one of the arches, and the current inland most arch is only half its former size.

Here’s a closer up.

On June 20, this is what remained of arch #1.

Here’s a closeup.  I’m wondering if the workers in the lift basket held a camera so that the extension jack hammer could see what he was doing.

Then I noticed . . . about where arch #4 had been a new column was being erected in sections.

The tall crane does the lifting, and workers in two lift baskets–an orange and a green–guided the section into place, fitting the guide rods–it seems–into slots in the section being lowered.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any mis-reading of the process.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,307 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031