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These fotos taken since last Wednesday show part of the range of weather we’ve had since Wednesday.  And here’s a surprise:  Crowley’s Courage in the Stapleton anchorage . . . as of this writing, she’s off Florida halfway between Jacksonville and Miami.

Lincoln Sea, same day, off BAT, just before that wicked storm erupted . . .  derupted/descended . . .     Great pics at that link.

Buchanan 10 was making her way across the Upper Bay as

the wind started to kick up some splash.   Did I get wet?  Yup . . . but I always carry a dry bag for stuff that dislikes water.   And I was afraid of getting zapped by the electricity in the sky as I walked home from the subway.  Yup . . .  tugster on the subway..  Hey . .  . parts of the subway lines allow me to travel beneath the sixth boro without a submarine, as depicted by Duke Riley.

Here’s Siberian Sea, also on Wednesday.

Saturday morning light was quite different, after more than two days of rain.  D . . . I hope that answers your question about shooting through glass.  This was the huge 12,000 hp OSG Vision pushing OSG 350 westbound on the KVK yesterday morning.   Given what ATBs work the Great Lakes, I’m wondering about the claim here that Vision, a year even, was the world’s largest ATB unit.    On this foto, I’m also shooting into the morning sun.

Here Wicomico passes MSC Federica.  Notice the white structure atop the containers (left of the turbine) on Federica.

Here’s a close-up.  Anyone else notice it?   . . . identify it?

Beaufort Sea passes Zim San Francisco.

By the way, what are those blue “seaco” units on San Fran‘s deck?  Also notice the sailboat up there on the load!!  Doubleclick enlarges.

Rounding out this post, my till-favorite large tug in the sixth boro . . .  Atlantic Salvor,  just a bit over half the hp of OSG Vision, not that hp tells the whole story.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post but related to the major focus of this blog:  I’ve adding the comment by R. A. Pena because it may please you and some of you may be prompted to research it.  His note follows: with a bit of editing by me”

we owe our life to the captn and crew of tug boat CABO ROJO; they saved us from capsizing on 13 of may 1966 on rough weather crossing from cuba to florida; will never forget them; our boat was a 17 footer; l was 18 yrs old at the time.   now at 66 l would like to have a photo of the ship or his crew. god bless them and god bless america.  note at the time of our rescue tugboat CABO ROJO was pulling 3 barges behind it with molasses on a trip from puerto rico to new orleans.  who was to tell that  [our] faint far away light was seen in the distance.  it was going to be our salvation. thanks a million captn god bless. tugboat CABO ROJO and his crew. r .a. pena vero beach fl. 7-22-2012. note our boat the ANITA was abandoned to the mercy of the sea due to certain circumstances; every time l remember seeing it fade away under the lights of the reflectors of tugboat CABO ROJO l can’t stop tears . thanks again for saving our life. gratefully yours r.a pena”

 

Mr. Pena . . . thanks for writing the wonderful note.  I hope we can find a foto of CABO ROJO operating between PR and Nola in 1966.

Summer begins on Memorial Day, and the summer solstice does in some instances go by the term “midsummer’s day and night,”  calendars begone.   I spent a delightful and long day yesterday working at Portside in Red Hook and watching, among other things, the traffic in the sixth boro.  Like two schooners–Clipper City scantily besailed and Pioneer wearing its four-piece suit–plying their trade.  That’s Jersey City in the distance.

aamemccp

Here Clipper City motors out of the East River.  That’s the Wall Street area of Manhattan in the background.  Off Clipper City‘s stern is Buchanan 10, and passing far starboard is the powerboat High Tea.  More fotos of High Tea in a later post.  Does anyone know more about her?

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A crew on Ellen S. Bouchard worked yesterday, as did a crew on Pioneer, in the distance.

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Here’s a close-up of Buchanan 10.

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And it made my day to see she-who-does-not-requite Alice come back into town.  I don’t know if the aggregates she carries come–as they used to–from the St. Croix River area, but what endeared her to me to begin with is the sheer tirelessness of this vessel.  That’s what started it all, and–so much for what I said about being resoluteAlice . . . I still have a place for you.

aamem4Summer 2009 . . . yesterday started you well.

All photos, WVD.

Although not all vessels on the harbor work there, all these fotos come compliments of Bernie Ente from the Working Harbor Committee. See the schedule for their fabulous summer 08 tours here. Well, the harbor doesn’t serve only for work. However, for

Coral Sea,

Buchanan 10,

the automated lighthouse “Kate” at Robbins Reef,

Doris Moran, with a ghostly Saint Michael’s Monastery Church on Union City ridge in the background,

and Socrates,

the sixth boro is the job site. Socrates, where did he come from? Uh, a Norfolker migrating up.

Now that clock in the background . . . well, the one that stood there until 1924 ended up in Jeffersonville, Indiana, facing across the Ohio River toward Louisville.

Several times I’ve used the title “from the line locker” for days too many ideas wanted to crowd themselves into the blog at once. To keep things new, let me now call this “trawl blog,” as in what a trawl net hauled up from a few minutes at the bottom of the harbor might yield, e.g., mussels, a puffer fish, a “white fish,” bits of seaweed, a Spanish dollar, a sea horse or two, etc. Well, some of those, and not that I’m a fan of trawling. So let’s unpack the cod end of my foto net.

 

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Truckable tug Jayne Davis, above, pushes a barge with a clamshell back to the Brooklyn bank.

 

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Buchanan 10 strings a bevy of barges on the hawser.

 

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East River regular, aka diamondback terrapin, goes under cover. And no! this submerged terrapin has no affiliation, national security or otherwise, with a replica of a “turtle submarine” catching some Red Hook attention today. See going coastal’s story here for a great foto of the “turtle.”  Here’s a flickr foto set.

 

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Migratory mourning dove rests on a bobstay above a safety net and oblivious to the cartoonish blue figure behind it.

 

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Castle William, erstwhile military installation on Governor’s Island, serves as shade for nature painters.

 

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And what vessel is this whose deck will serve as stage for an opera in . . . only a month!! Volunteers aka vollies are needed to get this space shipshape… er, ready for Il Tabarro. Email Carolina at PortsideNewYork if you can put in a few fun fantastic hours this coming Sunday afternoon or any Sunday afternoons this month. I’ll be there.

The heat has taxed my brain and the only commonality these fotos have is the cameras of Will Van Dorp. Sorry if this really rambling string culminates like a “Burma Shave” series. Anyone recall those? I hate billboards generally, but Burma Shave had a good gimmick.

Postscript: Let’s do a group gallery for the US Labor Day happening in about a month. If you’re so inclined, email me a foto depicting anyone laboring on the water anywhere. (Medium quality jpegs 500 pixels on their longest side preferred; include a brief description of the labor, laborer, or labored upon; also, tell me how to phrase the foto credit. This post might exemplify the foto subject material. It’d be great if you could get a “you gotta know somebody” type foto such as these on Fred’s blog.)

Just an idea to promote blogging; lurking is acceptable too.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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