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All day long, one ferry or another crosses the harbor, and one tug or another

travels light from point A to

point B and

makes up to another vessel

to move it to where it’s needed.

I was fortunate to see this vignette

of one part of someone’s day play out.

All photos, WVD.

Crushed stone is a commodity indispensable for construction.  Previous commodity posts can be seen here from 2010, here 2011, here 2013, here 2017, and many other instances not identified as such, like this one.

Here’s a new name on this blog:  Posillico, operator of Breakwater Marine and tugboat Deborah Quinn, the 1962 one.  Does anyone know the intended outcome of this work on the Manhattan side of the Williamsburg Bridge?

As it turns out, there’s another tugboat that once carried the Deborah Quinn name.

This Quinn is a large boat:  92′ x 27′.

Sea Lion is a regular on the East River, here heading into Newtown Creek. 

At 65′ x 27′, Lion dates from 1980.

 

Brinn Courtney is fairly new in the sixth boro, and

appears to be keeping quite busy.

The first time I saw her she still had some red livery on her here.

 

 

All photos, WVD, whose previous iterations of this title can be seen here.

 

 

Let’s jump back to the present . . .  and Doris Moran, both light

and moving containers across the harbor to the other container port back fields. If I count right, that’s 160 containers not on chassis pulled by trucks on the BQE, SIE, or other such clogged arteries.

Brinn Courtney is moving a scow, as

is Eastern Dawn.

Mister Jim and all the CMT boats seem to

be getting

a makeover.

Marjorie B. might be going to pick up her daily train cars.

Kimberly Poling basks in the dawn liight.

All photos, recently, in the sixth boro, WVD, who won’t be in the boro for the rumored tugboat race this weekend.  If you’re out there, take photos, especially ones with splash!

 

Sometimes you need a spell out of the routine to spawn new ideas.  My long sweltering time in the GOM this summer communing with alligators and sugar cane may have had that effect.  In this case, the “new” idea–as it often is–is to go back to an old idea, but twist it in a new way.  I started “non-random” tugs way back in 2009 here.   I’d done a variation on this actually two years earlier with the “bronze” fleet and here and here.  There have been others too, but I think you catch my drift.

So let’s go.  Between my two stints in the torrid GOM, I was hoping to catch a photo of one of the sixth boro’s “newest” names, Brinn Courtney.  Below is closest I got, and it was certainly a photo I’d not run without context. 

After returning, I caught John Joseph–when i first saw it in the distance I thought it was the elusive Brinn Courtney.

A short time later, I saw it in formation with USCGC Willow, although I wasn’t sure if John Joseph was escorting Willow, or vice versa.

A few days later, I caught John Joseph on the move again.

Imagine my joy then to catch Brinn Courtney twice yesterday, once pushing a barge and then

light.

All photos, WVD.  More fleet sets to come.

More past sets can be seen here and here and here

Let’s start with a photo by John “Jed” Jedrlinic, one of Alp Forward, currently off the eastern Scottish coast. She’s a 213′ x 61′ anchor handling tug from 2007  with over 200 tons bollard pull.

From there, let’s go to the Connecticut in US coast and some local boats with 

some Seakite by PanGeo Subsea gear aboard. I’d love to see what this package projects onto a screen. 

Both Berto L. and Josephine K Miller were up at Lew’s port earlier this spring.

GO Pursuit, fleet mate of GO America, called in there also. “GO” expands to Guice Offshore. 

The reminder of photos here come in the past days from Tony A, starting here with Deborah Quinn

He caught her several times in the East River, and here  

with an unidentified covered barge.   In the photo above, the Taco Cina sign intrigues me. 

In roughly the same stretch he passed Brinn Courtney, whom I’ve yet to see.

And finally, he noticed Nicholas Vinik doing the do si do with Sea Monster, moving her over near the Sandy Hook Pilots station.  I’m not sure what that means about Sea Monster.  Anyone know?  

Many thanks to Jed, Lew, and Tony A for sending along these photos. 

Meanwhile, the robots are still doing their unmonitored best at tugster tower while WVD is in the lowland of alligators, shrimp, sugar, fleur de lis and beaucoup de plus for an unspecified time.

 

Here was the first post in this series, but Wednesday I caught the crane again, this time being handled by a regular in the boro as well as a newcomer named Brinn Courtney, who appeared here once before as Patricia Winslow

Thinking the better shot would be with Manhattan as background, we opted for the NY side,

but as we passed on our way to another job, we noticed the green stack on the starboard side of the tow.  I’d not seen that earlier and had not taken time to look at AIS.

At first I thought Charles James, but her red paint has been covered over a few years ago, so i finally looked at AIS and saw

it was Brinn Courtney, a new-to-Stasinos boat. 

I would have taken more of Brinn Courtney, but we were already late for a rendezvous.  

Welcome to the boro, Brinn Courtney.  She appeared here once about eight years ago as Patricia Winslow.

All photos on the fly, WVD. Thanks to the New York Media Boat for conveyance.

Note:  By this time tomorrow, I will be out of the boro and the robots in tugster tower will again have their virtual fingers and hands on the controls.  I’ve no idea how long I’ll be away on this gallivant, nor what the WiFi situation will be.  Go, robots!

 

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