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See the draft numbers? Here‘s a good definition of and discussion of their usages.  I pay attention to these just because I’m a curious layperson. These appear in multiple locations around the hull because draft varies longitudinally. The markings here I’ve read near the stern, as below, or the bow.

This bulk carrier had discharged most of its load and not yet ballasted itself for sailing.  The froth forward of the draft numbers comes from the cooling system.  The two staples (or are they padeyes?) would be useful in the case of propeller work or other underwater repairs near the stern of the vessel. All those other numbers indicate info about the interior structure of the vessel, and are above my current paygrade. 

The draft markings I read as 9.2.  Some of you might read this with more nuance.  These marks differ from payload to payload and are also used to measure air draft.

I’d read this as 10.8.

I read this as 11.

This starboard bow marking I’d call at 11.3.  With this vessel underway, notice the physics causing the water to flow over the bulb and up the knife edge.

This . . .12.6.

Lots of info here, but the draft makings here say 13.4.  The 90t on the recessed shell bitt indicates how much towing pressure this is capable of.  The G and L on the load line disk indicates the Germanischer Lloyd classification society;  an A and B here would mean American Bureau of Shipping

Draft here looks like 14.4.  The disk with four spokes indicates the location of the thruster. 

I digress, but Hyundai Speed has two bow thrusters.  Note also the info on the size of the bulb.

Note that two sets of draft markings (and two staples) here. 

I read this as 14.4.

So how about this one?  Is it the deepest of all?

Actually, Double Skin 509A has the least draft.  This is feet and would convert to about a 5.2 on the same scale as the others shown above.  Well . . .  we have resisted much use of metric measures.

All photos, WVD, who alone is responsible for any errors here. For much more on ship classification societies, click here.

Here are the birds.  Now what’s the rest of the story?

Part of the story is told by these flags, US courtesy, German registry, and is that a pilot flag?

She was large for a 2008 container ship:  1098′ x 140′ with a capacity of 8606 teu.

 

I’d love to know more about accessing that lifeboat, given the cargo configuration.

And where are the birds?

 

Doubleclick on that last photo to see the closeup . . . you can almost hear the excitement!

All photos, WVD.

 

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