You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Breakneck Ridge’ tag.

Pre-foliage spring is optimal time for seeing the landmarks along the Hudson.  This one is near Wilderstein (scroll), but I’d never seen it before.

Esopus Meadows cannot be missed either down bound or up.  Get on the wrong side, and you’ll regret ever being here. Click here for tugster posts showing the light in all the seasons.

I wonder what the crew on the anchored bulker thought of the Beaux-Arts structure on the bank.  I wonder what some of foreign crews coming up river think of the river as a whole?

Comet heads northbound with segments of dismantled TZ Bridge.  The first specific example I’ve heard of reuse is here, in Mount Vernon. 

At first glance, I thought this was odd snow accumulation on the banks,

closer up . . . an auto auction lot.

Tilcon operates one of the most conspicuous quarries along the river, seen here last week from the water and here

from the train.  Quarrying has been a major activity along the river.  And here finally I see the derivation of “trap rock,” which this crushed aggregate is sometimes called:  trap, as in stairs, for all those Dutch speakers out there.

I’ve been curious about this large crane near Chelsea NY since last summer.  Now my best guess is that it’s related to NYC Water Tunnel No. 3.  Any DEP readers help out?

Just below the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, we meet the Buchanan 12 and her herd of barges, heading up to Tilcon for trap rock.  For many more views of Buchanan 12, click here.  We met her just as she left the sublime highlands.

Of all the many posts I’ve mentioned Bannerman’s in, here and here are my favorites. For close-ups, click here.  In this era of gun questions, here’s an article with specifics of his unregulated trade.

Breakneck Ridge looked particularly ominous with afternoon sun cast shadows.  It appears MTA trains will stop there if you have a ticket.

And movement on a ridge in Little Stony Point . . . a photographer.  Like me.  And the “point” . . .   it was once an island. 

South of here, more beautiful scenery awaited, but I got distracted and took no more photos in the fading light of late afternoon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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