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August can be hazy, and it appears that some August days in 2010 were, as below when Colleen McAllister towed dredge spoils scow GL 501 out and Brendan Turecamo (?) moved Bouchard barge B.No. 260 westbound in the Kills.  Colleen has now traveled from sun to ice out to the Great Lakes, where the 1967 4300 hp tug is currently laid up.   Brendan is alive and well and working in the sixth boro.

Kimberly Poling, then in a slightly different livery than now,  pushed Noelle Cutler in the same direction.  Both still work the waters in and out of the sixth boro.

These days I just don’t spend much time near the sixth boro at dusk, but here Aegean Sea pushes a barge northbound in the Upper Bay.  Aegean now works the Massachusetts coast, and I recall she’s made at least one trip back to the Hudson since 2013.

On a jaunt on the lower Delaware, I caught Madeline easing the bow of Delta Ocean into a dock.  The 2008 4200 hp Gladding Hearn tug is still working in the Wilmington DE area. Delta Ocean, a 2010 crude carrier at 157444 dwt, almost qualifies as a VLCC. She’s currently in Singapore.

Madeline is assisted here by Lindsey, the 60′ 1989 Gladding Hearn z-drive boat rated at 2760 hp.

Duty towed a barge downstream near Wilmington.

Recently she has sold to South Puerto Rico Towing and Boat Services, where the 3000 hp tug is now called Nydia P.  I’d love to see her in SPRT mustard and red colors.

I traveled from the sixth boro to Philadelphia as crew on 1901 three-masted barkentine Gazela.  In upper Delaware Bay, we were overtaken by US EPA Bold and Brandywine pushing barge Double Skin 141Gazela, like other mostly volunteer-maintained vessels, is quiet now due to covid, but check out their FB page at Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild.   US EPA Bold, now flying the flag of Vanuatu and called Bold Explorer, is southwest of Victoria BC on the Salish Sea. She was built in 1989 as USNS BoldBrandywine, a 2006 6000 hp product of Marinette WI, has today just departed Savanna GA.

Getting this photo of the barkentine, and myself if you enlarge it, was a feat of coincidence and almost-instant networking, the story I’ll not tell here.

On a trip inland, I caught Tender #1 pushing an ancient barge through lock E-28B.  I believe Tender #1 is still in service.

From a beach in Coney Island one morning, I caught Edith Thornton towing a barge into Jamaica Bay on very short gatelines.  Edith is a 104′ x 26 1951-built Reading RR tug that passed through many hands.  currently it’s Chassidy, working out of Trinidad and Tobago.

Here’s another version I shot that morning. For even more, click here.

The mighty Brangus assisted dredge Florida.  Back in those days, the channels of the sixth boro were being deepened to allow today’s ULCVs–like CMA CGM T.Jefferson— to serve the sixth boro.  If I’m not mistaken, Brangus has been a GLDD tug since it was built in 1965. Currently she’s in the Elizabeth River in VA.

Here she tends the shear leg portion of a GLDD dredging job.  See the cutterhead to the left of the helmeted crew?

On another hazy day, a light Heron heads for the Kills.  The 1968-built 106′ x 30′ tug rated at 3200 hp was sold to Nigerian interests in 2012.   I’d love to see her in her current livery and context.

Java Sea resurfaced in Seattle as part of the Boyer fleet and now called Kinani H, seen here on tugster just a month ago.    The 110′ x 32′ tug was launched in 1981 as Patriot.

And finally . . . probably the only time I saw her, crewboat Alert.  She appears to be a Reinauer vessel.

All photos, WVD, from August 2010.  If you want to see an unusual tugster post from that month, click here.

For some unusual August 2010 posts, click here.

 

 

Back last November, I devoted a whole month to ports and harbors.  As I get new material, I’ll continue that series.   Here Boston’s latest fireboat passes in front of Logan’s control tower.

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Here’s her namesake.

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Massport has its own fireboat, American United.  Its predecessor–Howard W. Fitzpatrick— was the subject of several tugster posts as it made its way up to Lake Huron to become a dive boat.

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Claire looks like she was based on a hydrofoil design, but I can’t find any evidence to support that.

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From my vantage point, I could tell the controls were right up in the bow.  I’d love to get a tour of her wheelhouse.

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This Nantucket aka LV-112 moved from Oyster Bay to Boston six years ago, a transit covered by tugster here.  This Nantucket is not to be confused with WLV-612, which frequently appears in the sixth boro.

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Angus . . . good to meet you.  Somehow I expected you to look like Brangus.

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Can anyone fill in some info on the history of King Triton?  Is it a modified former government vessel?  In the background are the digesters on Deer Island.

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I believe that’s Ocean King, whom I saw in the sixth boro back in 2010.

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Here, identification thanks to Paul Strubeck are the 1958 Nancy (red), the 1954 Brandywine (green) , and an unnamed Army tug.  And over on the far left side of the pier, it’s

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the 1940 Brooklyn-built Gaspee.

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Over on the fish side of the harbor, here’s David Tonnesen’s 45′ stainless steel sculpture called Cod.  Wind spins the discs on its back, and windspeed determines the color of the eye, s0 it’s a wind speed indicator.

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Along both sides of Boston’s Fish Pier,

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boats offload their catch.

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More from the port of Boston tomorrow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Gramma Lee T Moran, 2002

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Jay Michael and Mister Jim,  1980 and 1982

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Mister T, 2001

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Mister T again

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Brandywine and Viking, 2006 and 1976

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Kimberly Turecamo, 1980

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Red Hook (a first on this blog) and Severn, 2013 and 2008

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B. Franklin Reinauer, 2012

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Shelby Rose, 1963

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Hubert Bays, 2002.

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All fotos taken in the past week by Will Van Dorp.

When over 5000 horses get pulling, generating 68 tons of bollard pull, smoke happens.  That … and the tanker starts to move.    And Gramma Lee T Moran (May 24, 2002)  feels satisfied.

Marjorie B McAllister (1974) escorts Stena Concert into her venue . . . er . . . berth through

a congested KVK.  Foreground here . . . East Coast ( 1982) approaching and Pocomoke (2008) distancing.

June K (2003) hauls out the crumpled and rusted scrap metal for new life,

John P. Brown Thomas Brown (1962) , East Coast, and Brandywine (2006) all facing west in Bayonne,

Baltic Sea (1973) (Was she originally painted blue as S/R Albany?) heads east,

and a fairly new Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009) comes in from sea.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated . . . I’m literally knocked out by the entries to the Patty Nolan bikini contest.  Just kidding.  Maybe the figurefigure will be dubbed ” P Lady Godiva Nolan” this year?

It’s been a while since #2 in this series, but seeing Rebel this past week prompts a new installment.  What first drew my attention was the sound;  Rebel roared as it backed a light barge out of IMTT.  Double click on foto to enlarge.

The superstructure was one I didn’t recognize.  Huge she is: 138′ x 46′ x 22′ deep draft with air draft of 82′ and 7200 hp.  Notice how small Ross Sea (ex-Normandy) seems in spite of her 95′ x 32′ x 14′ and 3400 hp.  I wonder if Rebel‘s air draft is with antenna down.

Given the sound and the ease with which the barge extracted from the dock, I was surprised that Rebel has not more than 7200 hp.  Notice Nathan E. Stewart with potable water barge Aqua passing on the far side of KVK, and a

few minutes later, that’s Rebel and Ross Sea pursuing Taurus, nearing the KV buoy.

In comparison, here’s Christian Reinauer: 124′ x 40′ x 22′ with air draft of 85′ and also 7200 hp.  Christian came into service in 2001, whereas Rebel has worked as Toya Alario and  Patricia E since 1976.

In comparison with the two above, here’s a shot of Vane Brothers Brandywine from this weekend:  launched in 2006, Brandywine’s dimensions are 123′ x 38′ x 22′ deep.  Here’s a foto of the house interior for Brandywine, and youtube of launch of Christiana, Brandywine‘s twin.    I’d love to see an interior shot of Rebel and Christian.  Anyone help?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

PS:  For sights we don’t see in the sixth boro or anywhere out east, click here for Fremont Tug, running out of the Puget Sound.  I like the stories and the fotos, especially ones of  Seaspan Commodore and the log barges, as well as the adventures of Stinger and Dixie.

According to the family history here, they started with schooners and currently, besides oil, they push water and do more.  Monday I caught Susquehanna standing by along the KVK as container vessel Zim Shenzhen hurried for its assignation in Port Elizabeth.

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The following four pics come from Jim Demske, who’s worked for Vane for over twenty years as Captain and is now Port Captain in charge of “New Tug Construction.”   Elk River entered service mid-summer 2009, just a little over six months after Sassafras did.

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Seabart sends along a link to the 23 August issue of Tugs Towing & Offshore Newsletter with a short piece about the Charles Burton launch:  see page 4/12 of this link.  Charles Burton is sibling to Elk River and Sassafras.

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Compare wheelhouse of a Sassafras class with

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that of Vane Brothers largest class–Brandywine.  Click on boatnerd’s site here for pics of Brandywine’s first splash in early 2006 at Marinette Marine in cold  Wisconsin.  These folks also built the Molinari class Staten Island ferries.

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More Brandywine and its mate Double Skin 141 here, loa 480′ and capacity of 145,000 barrels, also built in Wisconsin.

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Jeff Anzevino took the next two fotos, Potomac of the Patapsco class, operating in the icy

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Hudson north of Poughkeepsie.

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Like the lead foto, I took this one.  In this case,  Patapsco thrusts forward and divides Hudson water in the Great North River race in 2007.  Beyond Patapsco are Lucy Reinauer and Nathan E. Stewart.  The two cruise ships mostly visible are Norwegian Spirit and Norwegian Dawn.

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Again, special thanks to Jim and Jeff for use of these pictures.

Nanticoke

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Choptank . . .

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Nanticoke again . . .

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Wye River . . . though it looks the same as Nanticoke and Choptank.

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Christiana . . . is in a different class, for Vane, although she looks a lot like a certain Reinauer.

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Chesapeake . . . thought it could be –at least to my eye– either Wye River, Choptank, or Nanticoke.

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Wye River . . . although it could be Chesapeake with nameboards switched?? [No, there’s a slight window difference in the wheelhouse.]

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The nameboards say Wicomico.

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Wicomico again.

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Wicomico a third time, passing what  looks like Charles D. McAllister.

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Patapsco, according to the nameboards.

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Brandywine is a twin of Christiana.  At 6000 hp, they’re a smidgeon less than 1/3 more hp than the Patapsco class.

aaaav15Back to the Patapsco class, it’s Bohemia.

aaaav15bOf that class, I’ve yet to see Patuxent, Anacostia, and Severn.

Has there ever been another company that had 15 identical (are there nuances I’ve missed??) tugboats?  And on the Patapsco class, why does the forward companionway lead starboard rather than port?

All fotos . . . Will Van Dorp.

Some folks have started imagining what “big boys” might face off in the upcoming sixth boro tugboat race. Although size certainly isn’t everything, it is something. From my archives, I’m including “local” tugboats rated over 6000 horsepower. Nicole Leigh generates 7200 horses.

The man near the stern reveals the size of Nicole Leigh.

Penn Maritime’s Julie churns with 7010 hp,

Vane Brothers’ Brandywine produces about 6000,

and 6480 horsepower for K-Sea’s Barents Sea. Notice the red pickup forward of the bow on the dock.

More to come, including the biggest I’ve seen in the harbor. Know some candidates?

So I have a question about units for quantifying “power.” Engine power on larger ships seems expressed in kilowatts, but in tugboats, the more common unit is horsepower. Is there a coming trend to rate the engines of tugboats and smaller vessels in kilowatts?

Unrelated: See a slideshow of the spill near New Orleans. Besides all river life, see who’s in trouble here.

Photos, WVD.

or are they dinghys? Ventura pulls one on a painter. I guess that word might have the same origin as pendant.

 

Half Moon slings a similar inflatable on its port side, sort of like a hypalon child.

 

Tanker Great Gull has one made off to the rail under a davit.

 

Brandywine has one on a cradle.

 

and W. O. Decker seems to be in negotiation. Will Decker or won’t she?

 

All photos, Will Van Dorp.

Thank the harbor gods and goddesses and design improvements and sandy bottoms … no spillage happened last week from White Sea. Design improvements? Double skin is one and …

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it shows in the names: here the 480′ barge Double Skin 141 lighters oil from Sovereign.

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Double Skin 141 is mated to the tug Brandywine, designed for many thousands of miles and millions of gallons of safe conveyance. Construction fotos of Brandywine for your pleasure. Constructed simultaneously in . . . Wisconsin!

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Vane Brothers, this is one huge ATB.

Photos by Wil Van Dorp.

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