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Being somewhat bored in rainy inland Georgia this morning, I thought to look through my drafts and found this . . . unfinished . . . from almost a year ago.  Enjoy.  Two years ago, I compared schooner hulls.  Be forewarned . . . some poignant fotos are here.

This hull reminds me of a streamlined and vibrant animal.  Can you guess it?

It’s Ellen S. Bouchard, launched 1982, 104′ loa x 35′ x 14′.

The next two fotos show the hull of Phillip T. Feeney, built 1892 . . . for as long as I can remember abandoned and disintegrating near the Port Richmond ferry landing.  I wrote about her here, and

Citynoise shimmied aboard her here.  Phillip will never again float, whereas

here’s Ellen S.  Check out the lower Manhattan skyline in the background and the absence of the towering 1 WTC. Cheers from away.  I’m surrounded by Georgia pine at the moment.  And come to think of it, what these two vessels do for the sixth boro is accomplished in upland Georgia by vibrant trees growing from the same ground and housing one type of life where old needles carpet the woods floor and fallen trees furnish it for others.

Unrelated:  houseboat living . . .

Fotos here were taken last Friday, much colder than today.

Conflicting jurisdictions?  It felt so cold along the water the other day that I totally understand a chase for no other reason than . . .  to speed up blood flow and heat, not that I’m saying this is happening here.  By the way, in blue, it’s Launch #4, the 55′ 1994-launched Kenny Hansen.  In yellow, it’s the 1980 Arkansas-built 85′ Gelberman, named for Jack Gelberman, who was chief of operations of NYC-area USACE  until 1973.

I move from “office” to “office” too, simulating chase maybe, staying warm.  And I track down Zachery Reinauer and the great Herbert P Brake.

A quick dash further east, I catch Sassafras with DoubleSkin 36 in push gear and Rhea I. Bouchard light, passing on the north side of the KVK,  Bow Architect and LaFarge barge Adelaide.

Still not quite out of breath, I spot Cape Cod spritzing past Theo T.

Moving again . . . jogging to keep warm . . . I espy (l. to r.) the bow of Bow Architect, a light Norwegian Sea, an approaching Conrad S, and (possibly) Davis Sea.

Three things about Conrad S give me pause for reflection:  the last name initial, the seriously tubular bow deck (not sure that’s the technical term), and the containerized tanks belonging to R. M. I. Food Logistics.  Here’s what I found.    So . . . alcohol, oils, syrups . . .. ?

It seems my day for single-letter last names, as in Gunes K, which

enjoys a bridge with big glass for perspicacious watch-keepers.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who really needs to rest in the shade of a palm tree for awhile listening to sweet music and honeyed conversation.

Unrelated:  For a look at shellfishing and much more happening around Nantucket, check out Martie’s blog:  http://nantucketwaterfrontnews.blogspot.com/

Bowsprite hears and transcribes memorable quotes from VHF chatter on the sixth boro;  I need to upgrade my radio before I get such plums.  So I’ll listen in using other sources.

That’s a very lonely Bohemia among all those barges.

“I prefer winter … when you feel the bone structure of the landscape – the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter.  Something waits beneath it, the whole story doesn’t show.”  Andrew Wyeth

From left to right:  Bluefin, Robert Bouchard, and Brandywine.

“Winter is the time of promise because there is so little to do – or because you can now and then permit yourself the luxury of thinking so.”  Stanley Crawford

Miss Callie fishing over by Blue Sapphire.    “Winter has a concentrated and nutty kernel, if you know where to look for it.”  Henry David Thoreau

McAllister Responder and Maurania III escort Nordatlantic into Global.  “Winter is the season in which people try to keep the house as warm as it was in the summer, when they complained about the heat.”    Nice observation from an unknown author

Buchanan 1 departs barges hanging on a mooring near a virtually invisible Bayonne.  “The color of winter is in the imagination.”  Terri Guillemets

HNSE 211 scrap barge, pushed by an bright blue but invisible Crow, heads for export in the hold of a salty bulker.  Over on the Brooklyn side, see the yellow crane of Cove Island.    “In a certain faraway land the cold is so intense that words freeze as soon as they are uttered, and after some time then thaw and become audible, so that words spoken in winter go unheard until the next summer.”  Plutarch

OK . . . some humor on the way out:  “I was just thinking, if it is really religion with these nudist colonies, they sure must turn atheists in the wintertime.”  Will Rogers What Will Rogers conjures up is the realization that the mermaid parade 2011 is only about four months away.  Seems soon.  Mardi Gras is over 30 days away.  Seems far.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who enjoys winter as much as summer and all the dozens of other seasons we experience in the sixth boro.

Unrelated:  To see what happens in Essex, MA, when sleet or snow is flying, click here.    Hey, schooners await their appointment with launch.

Cold waters of the KVK were not warmed  by this swarm of colorful steel housing powerful engines.  From left to right here:  Margaret Moran, Torm Carina, Evening Mist, Joan Moran, and facing us on the far side of the waterway, North Fighter.

At the same moment less than a mile away and at the same moment, Louise Knutsen prepared to turn south, bound for sea.  Her port of registry is posted as Haugesund, which I had to look up.

Nicholas Miller helps with crew change, and

ABC-1 assists with supplies.

Scotty Sky glides by, looking more submarine than tanker.

BBC Germany bunkers in the anchorage over by BAT.  Tug on the bunker barge looks like HMS Liberty. BAT is a Cass Gilbert-designed harbor gem.

Meanwhile, west side of the harbor, Michele Jeanne and crew survey while bobbing in the wakes of  vessels like Heron.  An unidentified bulk carrier loads scrap metal in the distance.

For some beautiful contemporary maritime paintings, check out the site of Melinda Hannigan here.

OKAY . . . I have to put up one more foto, taken just seconds after the lead foto in this post.

The harbor never sleeps, especially not with these neon safety colors mixed in.   The warm colors might not warm the waters, but they do, the air.  More Torm orange here and here;  if I didn’t like that shade so well, I’d be tempted to call it “tormented orange.”  Carina, despite Danish registry, was built in Korea.  To see work at the Danish shipyard of Odense, click here.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.

That milk campaign started almost two decades ago.   No one can dispute its success, I suppose, in selling milk, but I always thought the text should have read “Got napkin?” or “Got  a clean part of sleeve?”

The slogan came to mind yesterday:  I was hanging out along the KVK, teeth chattering as barometer of approaching hypothermia, having fun, and seeing snow and ice in unusual places.  So, maybe I can correct what I always imagined to be the flaw of the milk ads . . .  Like, the crew of Morgan Reinauer asking . . . “got a snow brush?”

Crewman on Taurus . . .”Got some

warm dry gloves?”

Janice Ann Reinauer herself, “Got my old bow pudding?”

Crew of Katherine Walker, “Got the GPS coordinates?”

Ruth M. Reinauer, “Got a warm notch somewhere, maybe RTC 102?”

Morton S. Bouchard Jr., “Got a berth close by where I can dock this?

Irish Sea, “Got a snow scraper?”

Kimberly Poling, “Got some

warmer ports to deliver to?”

And, I swear, in an Australian-English accent, this pigeon said, “Got some food and hot coffee, or do I need to land on the deck of Piltene out there?”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders how many days until he gets to walk around without a coat again.

Cold, though it’s all relative.  On the coldest day so far in the sixth boro it’s glided to a balmy 16 F;  thermometer in Barrow dropped to -38; International Falls, MN -34; Mount Washington Summit, NH -10; Montreal, Massena, and Toronto, -4; Rondout Creek, 0.

For the most-ice-encrusted award, check these fotos from tugster, April 2, 2008, with fotos taken in Boston February 2007.  Can anyone out-encrust this encrustedness?

Here’s a game:    I show part of a foto, and you might try to identify the vessel . . .

an answer of Marion C. Bouchard would have been correct.  Doubleclick enlarges most.

Let’s start here.  Although I didn’t take this foto, I did refer to it recently on this blog.  Note the logo.  Any guesses?

Unusual exhaust location . . .

“training wheels”

those can’t be superhigh steamer stacks, can they?

angular hull profile

tiny tires as fenders, or  …

Terrapin Island has a stack forward of the house.

Ellen McAllister, of course.

The unique Odin tailed by Ross Sea over by the Goethals Bridge.  Ross Sea seems to sprout a massive starboard stack here.  Anyone know whose stacks those really  are?

Lois Ann L. Moran

Huge tires, actually, on the gargantuan Atlantic Salvor.

And here’s the final one.  It’s Break of Dawn.  When I read that the tug that had the misfortunate to take the job of towing Mobro 4000, I assumed it was a local independent tug, not a fleet sibling of Dawn Services.    This blog has run fotos of Baltic Dawn and Atlantic Dawn.

For a fuller story of the motivations behind the “garbage job,” read this, starting from p. 243.

For the artistic story behind the children’s book, see this link for the series of decisions and sketches involved in creating the story.  As a disclaimer … I haven’t read the book and realize some controversy surrounds it, but check out the Amazon page video about the author’s process in creating the artwork.  To me, one important story here is an honest ambitious  crew doing a job that captures them, transforming them into pawns of a diverse, far-flung, and powerful interest groups.

The Break of Dawn fotos come thanks to Harold Tartell.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  I just added a blogroll link to Lars Johnson’s site on Swedish tugs and other vessels.    Thanks much to  Björn Wallde for sending these along.  Check out his comment for fotos!

And talking about being pawns . . .  my account of my time as a hostage in Iraq exactly 20 years ago is reaching its climax on the Babylonian Captivity site.  If you’ve not been reading it, my detention lasted from August until December 1990;  to read the account in chronological order, see the note upper right on the homepage.

 

Thanks to Pat Folan of Pelican Passage . . . a new Cutler boat?  See another foto at the end of the post.

Also thanks to Pat, a new Vane Brothers boat . . . Quantico Creek.  See fotos of the launch of the 3000 hp tug here.

A fairly new Wilmington Towing vessel, Capt Harry, brother of Sonie.

Odin, seen here many times before

Marion C. Bouchard, 1979 built.

Bohemia, a 4200 hp Vane boat.

And thanks to east river, the tiniest ATB power unit towing barge Massachusetts . . .


Clearly not a tug, but I wonder if anyone can identify this self-described Black Pearl . . . .

Finally, as promised, another view of the first vessel:  Crystal Cutler, a 1600ish hp newbuild rcently arrived in the sixth boro.  Welcome!

For more of Pat’s great fotos, click here.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

See you at the MWA 2010 Waterfront Conference on Tuesday.    For details, click the icon on left side of page.

Here’s 56.  Pegasus, 2006-launched.  Ex-Al Cenac;  now belonging to Metropolitan Marine Transportation.

Turecamo Girls, 1965.

Cape Cod, 1967.  I expected that fishing boat to surf toward me.

Ron G, 1978, but new to the sixth boro.

Captain D, 1974, ex-Dick Bollinger.

Her eminence, Gramma Lee T Moran, 2002

The fleety Maurania III, 2004.  See Mitch’s Newtown Pentacle here for the tugboat race results.

Bering Sea, 1975, ex-Stacy Moran and Cougar.

Ruth M Reinauer, 2009

Frederick E Bouchard, and I can’t find info on vintage.

Margaret Moran, 1979, and I believe that gull in the foreground is none-other-than the runaway Homie.  I suppose I should tell Captain Joey about the sighting?

All fotos taken Sunday by Will Van Dorp.

Little more than  fotos and names today:  Joan Moran Turecamo with Bridgeport on a short wire (?) in the Buttermilk.  (Sorry about that!  Thanks for the catch, anonymous.)  Joan Turecamo last appeared here.

Elizabeth headed into KVK.

Brendan Turecamo over near Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Thomas D. Witte just north of Howland Hook.

Christine M. McAllister crossing the Upper Bay with bulk carrier Antwerpen in the distance.

Paul Andrew tailed through the Arthur Kill by  No 242 pushed by Morton Bouchard IV.

Sassafras heading for the Stapleton anchorage.

Gulf Dawn standing by at the Manhattan passenger terminal.

Gramma Lee T. Moran approaching Mariner’s Harbor.

Parting shot:  primer on Lee T.‘s stack?

All taken in the past 10 days or so by Will Van Dorp.

And for a shot of the new tug Independence easing into Gloucester harbor as filmed by the inimitable Capt. Joey of Good Morning Gloucester, click here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

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