You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bloxom’ tag.

Captain Charles . .  1953.  Know the location?  The bridge in the background is a clue.  Answer can be found at the end of this post.

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James Turecamo, like me class of 1969, foto taken just before yesterday’s planned building implosion.  By that early hour, James had already earned a fair amount of “keep.”  To see James in Turecamo livery, click here.

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Hunter is something different!  She’s just towed in a dead fishing boat.  How much would a RIB like this cost new?

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Catherine and Kimberly, both Turecamo, escorted Tonna up the Arthur Kill, past the scrapyard where Gary Kane and I filmed the documentary.

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Jennie B, 1955, in the mighty Columbia.

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Captain Bob, August 1945 Marietta Manufacturing Point Pleasant WV hull #538, is a one year younger sibling LT of Bloxom (June 1944 and hull # 519)!  Also, in this run was Mary E. Hannah and James A. Hannah, posted here on tugster in 2012.   To get a sense what Captain Bob (ex-Sea Commander) looks like high and dry–and by extension what Bloxom of Graves of Arthur Kill once did–click here.  On the vessel below, I love the green “door.”

Scroll through here and here for more LT Army fotos.

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HMS Liberty 1978 here sidles up to schooner Virginia.

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Linda L. Miller, eastbound of the East River.   Linda L. and Gabby Miller assisted in loading Mighty Servant a year and a half ago.

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Coastline Bay Star, once known as Coney Island, dates from 1958.

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Longsplice (originally Shrike, 1959) recently high and dry near the Arthur Kill.

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Pilot, 1941 out of a yard in Sturgeon Bay WI, is a sibling of Spooky!

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And this vessel, on the left bank of the Willamette, I’ve no idea.  Anyone help?

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Getting back to that first foto, the bridge in the background is the Bronx-Whitestone.  Foto then is taken from the north end of that unique part of the Bronx called City Island.

All fotos taken in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

Very related:  I’m looking for someone (or some group of people)  to take over guest editor position of this blog for about a month this summer.  Compensation is a fortune of sixth boro shellbacks as well as fame;  you could become a paladin of the port.  You really can be geographically any watery place.  And you have to adhere to a disciplined foto-driven/sparse verbiage mix of workboats, history, eccentricity, and apolitical wit.  Of course, you can add to that a smattering of your own favorite sprinklings.

Hmmm . . . does that describe tugster?  Feel free to add to a characterization of the blog.  But seriously, I need to step away for a while this summer . . . to gallivant, of course.   Get in touch for details.   Learning the blogging template is not difficult.

In the numismatic world, “pristine” means “never cleaned.”   This captures something about the beauty of the “inner coast” aka “the Kills.”  As industry moved there, particularly, petroleum, which–like it or not–is the life blood of our world culture, the Kills have served as a laboratory in which human environmental modification and nature’s reaction have struggled in a dance of action v. reaction.  Click on the fotos to enlarge them.  I admit I can’t identify a lot of this debris, so please help me out and I’ll revise this post as we go.

Between Shooter’s Island and Mariner’s Harbor lie these remnants of  . . . paddlewheels and ship’s boiler.  Osprey have recognized the strategic value of the boiler as a nesting platform and moved in.  Anyone know the paddlewheel story?

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Here’s a view of the second paddlewheel.

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Farther down by Rossville rests retired Army tug Bloxom (1944), which I wrote about last year.  Amazing to me is that tugs of this same era–and older–still work.

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A little farther south are two unidentified wooden tugs.  Anyone know them?

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In the same Witte yard, here’s another wood-hulled tug.

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This interesting steel hull–on the bank off Charleston (Staten Island)–seems to have been a smaller ferry.  Anyone?

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In the same collection of decrepit wrecks, notice the nest (osprey?) on the stem bitt of the vessel to the left.

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More interplay of decaying machinery and nature, here with a car joining in.

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Also off Charleston, and in this case, a meadow forms on the erstwhile deck.

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I hope to get back here soon.  More Circum Staten Island fotos next time.  For now check out fotos of Shaun O’Boyle, opacity, and –of course–the intrepid Miru Kim.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

I mean the title here as “I’d love to see more Bloxom.” John Dupee took this shot of Bloxom from the waterside,

Franz Von Riedel took the one at this link from another water angle, and standing on the bank, I took the one below. Doesn’t smoke appear to be leaving the stack?

Bloxom (aka LT-653) was built in Point Pleasant, WV, for the US Army in 1944. Can anyone point to a foto of Bloxom in service either for the Army or later? Now, it disintegrates in Rossville in the Arthur Kill.

Unrelated odds & ends: Check out the comment by “rice hauler” which identifies the cargo on MSC Alexa.

Also, more pirate action along the Somali coast.

Photos, Unless otherwise stated, WVD.

One of my favorite “ear worms,” Gordon Lightfoot’s “Ghosts of Cape Horn” has a line “see them all in sad repair, demons dance everywhere … and none to tell the tales.” New York City’s waterways have ghosts of this sort as well.

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This vessel lies in the mud not far from the Whitestone Bridge.

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Can you make out the masts of a submerged lightship just north of the Erie Basin in Red Hook?

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Not submerged but locked into the south side of the entrance to the Gowanus Canal is this ship. A stern view, listing Rio Lobos as registry port, is visible from the Brooklyn Queens Expressway .

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The Kills have a wealth of ghost ships. Short of travelling through the Kills at low tide and seeing many like the above, you can see Noble’s fantastic drawings of ghost ships that have been claimed by the kills mud at Snug Harbor Cultural Center on Staten Island. It houses the fabulous Noble Maritime Collection, the drawings of John A. Noble.

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Above is a waterway view of the white-black-gray stern of Wavertree, not really a ghost ship although it has moved mostly only vertically since coming to Manhattan in 1968 from … Argentina. Wavertree was dismasted off Cape Horn in 1910 and could have become one of the vessels of the Lightfoot song; instead she became an elegantly shaped warehouse and barge in southern South America until she came to New York, where she waits in a ship purgatory.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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