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A friend who works on the Great Lakes sent me these next two photos recently.  When I saw Anglian Lady in the foreground, my first thought was that I’d seen her myself but she looked somehow different.  More on that later.

Anglian Lady was Thornycraft built and launched in Southampton UK as Hamtun, a 132′ x 31′ steam tug that operated for the company now known as Red Funnel. From there, it was sold to interests in Belgium and then back in England before being purchased by Purvis Marine of Sault Ste. Marie.

But the tugboat I recalled was not Anglian Lady.  It was another distinctive tug by Purvis Marine below.

I was thrilled back in September 2017 when I got out in front of it here.  Location?  Some clues are the structures beyond the bow and the stern of this tug.

Avenger IV is the tug I recalled.  She’s from Cochrane 1962, a former steam tug, 120′ x 30′.

The location?  This is a dozen miles east of the Mackinac Bridge.

The PML website can be found here.

Many thanks to the Great Lakes mariner for the first two photos and for getting me to have a second look at Purvis Marine.

And the G-tugs in the background of the top photo likely include Minnesota and North Dakota.

 

Here are the previous 8 installments.

We’ll start just north of Belle Isle and move north for these. From l to r, it’s Kimberly Anne and Andrew J, both sailing for Dean Marine & Excavating.

 

Near Sarnia and in front of the refinery that creates its product, McAsphalt Transportation’s Everlast lies at the dock.  Previous Everlast photos show her in locations as far east and downstream as Montreal. Here’s a bit of history on McAsphalt.  Want more here on the history of usage of asphalt, bitumen, or as Noah the boat builder called it, tar and pitch?  And want to get really nerdy “good news” about the evolution of asphalt road building and McLeod’s contribution published in Asphalt: The magazine of the Asphalt Institute , click here.

Venturing farther north and along the east side of Nebbish Island, it’s a fish tug.  Anyone know the name?

Farther upstream and hauled out, this tug appears to have Soo as the first part of its name, but I can’t make it all out.

Over on the Canadian side in the city of Sault Ste Marie, these boats appear to be floating for the duration.

On the US side of the Soo, it’s Rochelle Kaye and Kathy Lynn, both of Ryba Marine from the lower peninsula.

Beside the Bushplane Museum, it’s the Purvis Marine yard, beginning with large Norwegisn-built tug Reliance.

On the other side of the building is a menagerie of other tugs, including Avenger IV and W. I. Scott Purvis.

Wilfred M. Cohen, with some inside and out built in the US, lies along the pier.  Cohen previously appeared here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has the luxury of staying indoors today.

Quick post here:  This is the best I could do with Prentiss Brown Bradshaw McKee and her barge, Challenger, formerly the vintage St. Marys Challenger.  Click here for the story of the conversion.

They departed after us and passed far to starboard.

Here headed for Ste Sainte Marie, it’s Avenger IV, another classic.

The barge is PML 9000, and I’ve no idea of the cargo, regular or otherwise.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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