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In part 1, Treasure Coast slowly made her way to mid KVK, and I thought it was to get fuel, but it was soon apparent that she was there for an assist, to help ATB Galveston and Petrochem Producer to get off the dock.

The scale of Galveston is apparent from the workboat;  the tug is 144′ x 46′.

She’s slightly larger than Lynne M. Rose, and works with a total of 12,000 hp.

My vantage point has not changed here, so the movement here derives from the ATB powering astern.

Notice just to the left to the mooring line spools . . .

Normandy is the second assist tug.

Once the ATB is pointed east, the assist tugs back off.

 

 

 

Treasure Coast follows the ATB toward the Upper Bay.

As of posting, ATB Galveston/Petrochem Producer are off Palm Beach on their way to western Louisiana.

All photos, WVD, who has just confirmed a return to the bayous of western LA myself next week.

Unrelated:  If you’ve always dreamed of owning a tugboat yacht, here‘s one that popped into my feed just before post time.  Below are two photos I took of the same tugboat, Shenandoah, in Waterford on September 13, 2009.

Tug44 was a friend of the Buffalo-based owners at that time, Baltimore registry notwithstanding.

 

I’ve mentioned before here that I used to freshwater fish, a lot.  Canoe fishing at daybreak was the best, although there were days when nothing seemed alive in places where other days the waters fizzed with life and I could have several meals of fish in the boat before most people were awake.  The same could be said about sitting in certain places along the sixth boro.  This happened the other morning.  First Pelham left the dock.  

Just east of the salt pile she passed Treasure Coast, which was just more than stemming at two or so knots.

 

After pirouetting for a while just off Atlas Yacht Club, she spun back eastward and I thought she was going to refuel.   Adjacent to Treasure Coast are ATBs Galveston and Ruth M. Reinauer. I was introduced  to US Shipping back in 2008 with their ITB Philadelphia here, here, and here.

And we’ll pick things up there tomorrow.

All photos, WVD.

Related:  File this under the “I heard that but didn’t process it at the time” heading:  US Shipping Corp was acquired by Seacor almost a year ago.  Seacor is quite the diverse shipping company.  I recall last late summer was busy, and I didn’t come to understand that fact until now.  US Shipping has maintained their white/red/green livery.

Tangentially related:  Want to see a tugboat “constructed” in a 10-minute video?  Check out this video from Ocean Groupe from Canada.

Clearly unrelated but FUN:  Check out this live-eel barge . . .  it transports live eels!  Thx, Phil.

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Here’s 3.

Cape Washington left today, following in the wake of Lia.  Zim Beijing came in;  I’m guessing “my” Bebedouro will leave soon, and the pace of ins-outs is such that I have to content myself seeing in on AIS.

Although I’m intrigued with names and itineraries like OOCL Oakland and

Zim Qingdao back here yesterday,

traffic longterm runs together and

goes out of focus and even

blurs.

For a moment, that is.  HS Livingstone entered the harbor Saturday morning, and by midmorning Sunday, it’s off Atlantic City making for Baltimore.

In

in

inbound, then outbound  .  . .

I wonder about the blur for the mariner of these global box vessels.  Here’s a question I have insufficient info to answer:  Pick a year like 1940, and the number of dockworkers that year per ton of cargo transferred between ship and shore.  Now compare the tonnage of freight handled on the docks of NYC in 1940 and 2012 and thereby calculate how many dockworkers would be needed in 2012 using the 1940 dockworker/ton rate.  And why?  Check out this article in today’s NYTimes called “…Rise of the Machines.”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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