You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Arctic’ tag.

This is a very mixed bag:  differing locations, times, and type of ships. Installment 1 was from a very different time, two years and a few weeks ago. 

The first three photos come thanks to Steve Munoz. 

1990.  Somewhere on the Hudson . . . I can’t quite place it.  Penhors, launched 1986, is no more.  It last carried the name Anahuac.

1991.  The Red Hook container port.  Beate Oldendorff was launched in 1989 and scrapped in 2017.  In her lifetime she carried a slew of names:  Han Li, Thor Nectar, Beate Oldendorff, Tasman Mariner, Beate Oldendorff, TA Discoverer, after having started out as Beate Oldendorff.  To make searching difficult, at least three vessels have carried this name, somewhat common in companies that name vessels for family members.

1997.  In the port of Baltimore, Dubrovnik Express, a 1987 build.  She’s still afloat and in Egypt as MSC Giovanna.

2019.  Here’s a favorite of mine at the dock in Quebec City.  Arctic is currently between the Azores and Gibraltar on her final voyage  . .  . to the scrappers in Aliağa.

The bow testifies to her special habitat: the Canadian Arctic, since 1978. Her CAC4 rating means that she could move through 4′ of ice at 3 kts., ie, without an icebreaker escort.

Arctic is an OBO (oil, bulk, ore) vessel, not so common these days.  Since 1998, she made 136 voyages into the Arctic and back, mostly for ore.  Her replacement, Arvik 1, has been launched in Japan and is anticipated in Quebec City.  Designed for the same work, she looks similar to Arctic

2009.  Eastbound in the KVK, President Polk, launched in 1988, was scrapped in 2013, along with three other C-10s.

2014. Docked at Tata Steel, just west of Amsterdam. it’s Percival, launched 2010.  At 956′ and with a capacity of 177,065 dwt, she’s a VLBC, very large bulk carrier.  Currently called Springbank, she’s headed for Indonesia from Nantong.

2021.  Hyundai Ulsan, or is it Rickmers Savannah, was launched in 2011.  She was recently anchored in Gravesend Bay.

The first three photos, Steve Munoz;  the others, WVD.  Ships, like trucks, only earn when they move, and although things of beauty, are mostly utilitarian.

I’d put Orsula down as saltie, an ocean-going vessel of dimensions that allow her to travel deep freshwater inland, here a few days after the longest day of 2017 as far inland as Duluth; that’s 2000 miles from the Ocean.  In fact, here she’s headed for Europe, likely with a cargo of grain.  Last year, I caught her upbound just above Montreal.

Calling Atlantic Olive a saltie might be disputed, since here she’s departing the saltwater of NYC for the saltwater of the sea.  Olives can be salty, and maybe there needs to be a term for vessels that never leave saltwater . . .  other than ocean-going.

Ditto Onxy Arrow.  But since part of the goal of this post is to illustrate the variety of ocean-going vessels, behold a RORO. As cargo, there might be cars, trucks, army tanks, construction equipment, or anything else that can get itself aboard of its own power.  You might remember this previous post involving Onyx Arrow.

Marc Levinson’s The Box provides a good introduction to this relatively new shipping concept.

The sixth boro sees a lot of tankers and

container ships.

ACL offers the latest design in CONRO vessels, accommodating both containerized and RORO cargo.

Some bulk carriers have self-unloading gear.

Some otherwise obsolete break bulk cargo ships are adaptively repurposed as training vessels. 

Size is key to true salties being able transport far into the interior of North America via the Saint Lawrence Seaway locks.

This is not a cargo vessel, or as Magritte might have said, “Ceci n’est pas un cargo.”

Some CONRO vessels have the bridge forward, almost as an adaptation of a classic laker design.

And to operate in cold seas, hulls have special design and material modifications.

And at risk of making this a baker’s dozen, I have to add Orange Ocean, great name for a transporter of my favorite fluid.  Of course, this blogger cherishes other fluids as well, such as those once transported by the likes of Angelo Petri, as seen here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who offers this as just 12 of many  more types.

 

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