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After a seiche sped us from Buffalo to Cleveland through the night, morning found us under the Cleveland Memorial Shoreline Bridge, down where the Cuyahoga flows.  Cuyahoga, to most non-Clevelanders of my generation, connotes a many times burning river of the past.

Here’s a reference to that time on a sign inside the Greater Cleveland Aquarium.  I never visited Cleveland in the 1960s or ’70s, and without these opportunities to visit now, I’d have imagined it a possible setting for a Philip K. Dickesque dystopia.  As a caveat, let me say upfront that  I’ve not lived in Cleveland, so this post is based on impressions gleaned from reading and quick visits like this one.  But

this has to be the most unexpected postscript to any predictions made in 1972.

Believe it or not, this working Iowa is 102 years young.

All these photos–except the one directly above which I took on July 4, 2016–were taken in a few-hour period of time in late July 2017.

Restoration indeed, and with the collaboration of Cuyahoga River Restoration, cuyahoga arts & culture, and  ArcelorMittal.

Yet commerce goes on. It does not have to be “either-or-or.” A 634′ Buffalo weaves through what must be a captain’s nightmare to get to the steel plant under the corkscrew path of the Cuyahoga.

 

Simultaneously, a 630′ Manitowoc exits the Old River after having taken on a full load of road salt for Milwaukee from the Cargill Salt mines extending far under Lake Erie.

For both watch standers, this has to be an ordeal of concentration.

 

 

And a waterway already juggling commercial vessels and recreationalists, trains are another factor;  all small vessels lined up as one train after another cross this bridge move expeditiously once the lift rises.

 

My early 1970s self would never have imagined 2017 Cuyahoga’s mouth, although

accidents sometimes happen.

Still, I believe the effort is worth it.

All photos and sentiments by a gallivanting Will Van Dorp.

 

Georgetown is South Carolina’s second largest port.  More on that in a moment, but for now, here’s an intriguing photo from the South Carolina Maritime Museum in town.  Where in New York was this steam houseboat built, I wonder.  In the Santee Gun Club notes, it reports that it took four months to deliver Happy Days from NY to Santee.  And, are they standing on ice here?

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Here’s what I saw of commercial vessels in port.  In the background is

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the now-shuttered ArcelorMittal steel plant.  Beyond the steel plant is International Paper mill, clearly quite busy. The mill grew out of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company.

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I mentioned the maritime museum:  it’s worth a stop.  Also, check out the Gullah Museum.

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This intriguing artifact is outside, with the story

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here and below.   What’s misleading about the photo below is that the propeller is from the Norwegian freighter Eriksson, which at 285′ was smaller than the whaleback Everett, 346′.

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From Auke Visser, here are many more photos of City of Everett.

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One thing I found surprising about the history of Georgetown is its connections with Maine shipbuilders.

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You can guess how this encounter between the 168′ 506 ton four-master and the 403′ 6026 ton steamer turned out.  Read about the findings of the court in reference to the collision here. Click here for more info on SS Prinz Oskar, which became Orion after the US seized it.

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Will Van Dorp, who’s heading back to Georgetown in the spring, took the photos here both inside the museum and along the boardwalk.

*** Click here for the archive of the “early history of the Santee Club


		

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