You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘APL Japan’ tag.

Followingup from yesterday and “…maybe it’s time for new permutations of truckster, teamster, bikester, autoster, planester, hutster, hikester, storyster, . . . ” let me say you’ve sent in some great ideas which I’ll follow up on in the next few days.

For now, let’s glance back 10 years to April 2010.  Any idea what this is all about?

Indeed, it was the arrival of 343Here‘s the post I did on that event.

A perennial harbor towing star is the Thomas J. BrownHere‘s the post with these now reposted photos.  What’s amazing to me here is the fact that two scows are being towed on a single hawser attached front starboard side of the lead barge.

Maybe there’s a term for this, other than brilliant?

Currently a tug operates through the harbor with the name Curtis Reinauer. Actually it’s the third boat with that name.  The one depicted below, 1979, the second iteration, is now in West African waters.  The original Curtis was reefed, although I haven’t located where.

APL Japan, with its port of registry as Oakland CA, was built in 1995;  since she appears not to have moved in some months from its anchorage in Gulf of Khambhat, I’m guessing she’s scrapped, although I can’t find evidence of that.

I count 15 containers across on the stern.

And finally, Steve Irwin, the Sea Shepherd boat, was in town in April 2010.  It has since been retired, was slated to be scrapped, but then saved as a museumship and is currently in Williamstown, Victoria in Australia.

The post I did on Irwin back then did not include the photo below, and

although I included the photo below, I did not comment on the ports of registry given, Rotterdam AND Kahnawake.  Now that I recognize what that is, I’m wondering about that relationship.  how many other vessels are Kahnawake registered?  Here‘s part of the story.

All photos here, WVD, taken in April 2010.

Stay healthy.

Between 0800 and 0900 this morning, sunshine poured down onto the KVK, and deepened all the colors.  Sand Master (more of these fotos tomorrow) was positively radiant while waiting–it seemed– for something to happen before it can get into the fuel dock.

Then I saw the “something” as Mount Hope began to inch stern first into the stream.   Laura K. Moran surged from port

to starboard to assist in the rotation, her power and precision captivating me.  But then, way atop the superstructure, movement

caught my attention, a bit of ceremony I’ve never noticed before.  A crewman made the flag fast to the halyard and

ran it up, as if to say . . .  we

are now open for business.  Here  is some of the traffic:  Mount Hope outbound passes APL Japan inbound.

OOCL Nagoya seemed to try to get up on plane, and

in doing so . . .  tailed by Barbara McAllister, deftly carved an arc between the bank and an incoming Affinity on the hip of  Marion Moran.

I then went to my appointment on the land side of Richmond Terrace, noticing from indoors two Ital container vessels (Moderna and another) passed.   Before noon, as I headed back home, I noticed that Oyster Creek with the bunker barge was refueling  Shorthorn Express  north of the VZ Bridge as

(this foto thanks to John Watson) Queen Elizabeth headed into port.  Draw what conclusion you will from the juxtaposition of these last two vessels.

Thanks to John for the foto.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who imagines that without that flag-raising, none of this traffic would have happened.

By noon, bright sunshine had turned to overcast gray and then drizzle.  No snow, though.

Spring brings farmers and random green-thumbers to the fields, players to the parks and playgrounds, other folks to their gardens and yards, dancers to the streets, old and new vessels to splash into the water, landsmen and fraus to the pierheads, and fishermen and fotograffers for pleasant escapades along the riverbanks.  Boat crews spend more time on deck, where they can see to execute their work and take relief from it.  I last added to this series less than a month ago here.   Crew on Dynamic Express might be out to watch their escort as well as handle line.

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Deckhand on Miriam tends line on the h-bitt,

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and undoes it as needed.  Notice crewman at helm looking out port window.

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Crewman departs Zim San Francisco to rejoin Sisters,

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survey craft Wolf River currently has no one out on deck but their equipment lets them see where others can’t anyhow no matter who’s where,

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Enjoy the rest of these people on the boro shots:   Marion C. Bouchard,

aapb6Mary Gellatly,

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Houma,

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Ruth M.

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more Ruth M., which has an angular but interesting stern.

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Crewman on the sixth boro might call anywhere home, like this guy on Turkon Line’s Ecem Kalkavan as Taurus moves in with a bunker barge.

aapb10Crewmen from APL Japan prepare bays 54 and 55 to receive 20′ containers.

aaaapb9Actually, it’s time for me to get out there myself.  Later.

Images, WVD.

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