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Wow!  August almost passed us by without my doing a glance back to a decade ago.  McCrews is now in Philly I’m told.   Reliance and Justine are still with McAllister.  Lynx was sold foreign  and experienced an incident while being delivered, although I’m not sure how that turned out.  Barents and Yankee both were refurbished by Donjon:  Barents Sea is now Atlantic Enterprise and Yankee is now Signet Atlantic and sans upper wheelhouse.   Mark McAllister was scrapped, and Na-Hoku under the same name works for a company  based in Charleston SC.

 Ellen McAllister here was bringing in the future Alex McAllister, which has gone on to spend a lot of time working in the sixth boro, although I’ve not noticed her recently.

Patrice (had just had a tragic delivery fire in this photo)  and Bruce still work based out of the sixth boro.

 

I never did see Yankee after her upper wheelhouse was removed.  I may have to return to the GOM if I ever want to see her.

Duty is now Nydia P, and I’d have to go to Puerto Rico to see her.

Ireland became Hoppiness, and has been converted to a liveaboard on Lake Ontario but headed the inland waterways of the TVA system.

Labrador Sea is now Vane’s Brooklyn.

And finally, here’s a mixed set:  OSG 350 and OSG Vision still work under those names, Amy Moran became Stasinos John Joseph, and Scotty Sky became a snow bird and sails the Caribbean.

All August 2012, WVD, who after reflecting on all those changes admits to not being the same person as in August 2012 any more either.

 

Ten years ago, the WTC was incomplete, no supertalls/superskinnies were up, and Taurus was not yet Joker.

Miriam and the archway at Sailors Snug Harbor are all the same, although that dock is gone from there.

The 1969 Barbara McAllister is now Patsy K, operating out of the Gulf coast of Florida.

The 2003 Jane is now Anna Rose, and I’ve seen her in the boro a few times.

Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Crow was in her last days here, and has been scrapped more than a half decade already.

Charles D. McAllister has now been five and a half decades in service and still working in the sixth boro. 

Gage Paul was lost in transit after being sold overseas.   Note the seaplane on the East River.  

Last I knew, Buchanan 10 was laid up upriver.

In June 2012, I had the opportunity to tour USNS Apache near Norfolk.  A few years later, Apache was the vessel credited with locating the black box of El Faro, after its tragic sinking.

Sharing the dock with Apache that day was USNS Grapple.

All photos, ten years ago, WVD, who is currently traveling again, out of tugster tower for an indefinite period of time, getting more indefinite every day.  I have re-activated the robots, but we’ll see how reliable they are this time.

 

Ten years ago, the lower Manhattan skyline looked quite different.  A vessel bringing orange juice from the southern hemisphere was also a smaller one;  the 1985 Orange Blossom last sailed into Alang six and a half years ago, and if you don’t know what that means, click on the Alang link.  As it turns out, I may have caught photos of her last voyage inbound  Port Newark here.     Orange Blossom 2 completes her most recent voyage today, arriving in Santos BR–read this link for some superlatives–after departing the sixth boro on November 13. 

I’d thought 1976 Barents Sea was a goner, a reef candidate, when I caught this photo of her running after a long hiatus, but she was thoroughly rehabbed and lives on as Atlantic Enterprise.

The 1970 Evening Tide below was nearly 40 years into her career with Bouchard;  she’s now a Stasinos boat but her superstructure still painted in this brilliant red.

Laura K Moran–launched 2008– was among the top horsepower assist tugs in the harbor then.  She currently works in Savannah.

The 1981 McKinley Sea is currently laid up, carrying Kirby livery.

Ice Base and I had a misunderstanding;  upon first seeing her and lacking at that time a smart phone with AIS, I read her name as something different that I can no longer un-see. She’s currently in the port of Quintero CL, 50 miles north of Valparaiso, with the less ambiguous name of Cabo San Vicente.

Back in those days I often took advantage of the walkway along the west side of the Bayonne Bridge, something I’ve not done with the new walkway.  Note the absolutely ship-shape Gramma Lee T Moran as seen from above assisting 

NYK Romulus with Margaret Moran standing by.   Margaret is still in our fair boro, Gramma Lee is in Baltimore, and NYK Romulus is currently in Southampton UK.

The 1973 Amy Moran has been sold out of the fleet, and was last in the Jacksonville FL area wearing Stasinos tan and green as John Joseph.

And tomorrow I’ll post a part B of December 2011 retrospective, building on the odd orange vessel shown below.

All photos from December 2011, WVD, who’s astonished by the amount of change in a decade.

 

 

March 25, 2011 was a busy day.  L to r, Maurania III, USNS Yano, Resolute, McAllister Responder, McAllister Girls, Amy Moran . . . with a K-Sea barge at the mooring, and some iconic structures.  None of these vessels in currently in the sixth boro.  Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Let’s follow the USNS vessel first, as it’s assisted into the graving dock.  Yano is in Newport News at this time, 2021. 

Yano is an example of a US-flagged non-Jones Act vessel.

A bit later, more to the west, Davis Sea stands by to assist Taurus

and DBL 25 into a dock.  Taurus recently came to the boro from Philly as Joker.  Davis Sea is now Defender. 

The following day, Maurania III and

McAllister Girls sail British Serenity off the dock. Maurania III is now in Wilmington, and British Serenity is now Champion Timur and is in the Black Sea on a voyage that began in Indonesia.  Girls is laid up.

An hour later, Jennifer Turecamo assisted the big OSG 350 moved by

OSG Vision westbound.  Jennifer is in Tampa, and Vision runs in and out of Delaware Bay.

All photos and any errors, WVD, who notices the old Bayonne Bridge profile above.

For an update on Ever Given, click here.

And the answer to yesterday’s what and where Jay Michael off Bridgeport, CT….

Launched in 1973 as Amy Moran, she has spent 47 years by that name . . . .

her 3400hp responding to that name,

right up until now.

New paint jobs

and new locations . . .

meet John Joseph.

I suspect she’ll be heading out of town soon, and receiving more paint. AIS already shows her as John Joseph.

John Joseph photos thanks to an anonymous mariner.  Photos of Amy Moran by WVD.

For the previous 27 boats featured in this series, click here.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Sometimes the sixth boro gets crowded, as you can see from these posts.  This post tries to show that, but keep in mind that foreshortening makes these vessels seem closer than they are–the two ships below are more than a mile apart.  Keep in mind also that a water channel is a dynamic medium, current and wind are in play, and . . . there are no brakes.

 

About a hundred yards are between the docked “orange/green hull” and Cronus Leader.

Also, the KVK has numerous curves;  it seems here that the pale yellow will pass starboard to starboard with Cronus Leader,

 

but because of the winding channel, a few minutes later they’re clearly headed port to port.

The dark hull along the extreme left of the photo–and several shots above– is tied to a dock.  It’s the NYC DEP sludge tanker Hunts Point, now in service for over five years, as profiled in this article.  It’s time I do another post on the sludge tankers.

 

Orange Sun has safely passed Cronus Leader, leaves plenty of space passing Hunts Point,  

and lets Denak Voyager, heading to Port Newark to load scrap metals, ease through the opening along its portside.

 

A total of fifteen minutes has elapsed between the first photo in this post and the one above.  Scale here can be understood by looking at the crewman on watch–all wearing orange– on the nearer orange juice tanker and the farther bulk carrier.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that at least two things are remarkable here, both the efficiency of effort on the part of the vessel crews and the variety of cargo represented.

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

Pushing and shoving  . . . are they different in this context with 3000 hp concentrated in the right location?

New steel and recycled name . . . Torm Hilde, the 114,000 dwt tanker in port recently, got spun around in the KVK by Kimberly and JRT.

Torm Hilde is one of the largest tankers operated by the company, now in its 130th year!

And while two Moran tugs are assisting the Torm tanker out, two more are assisting crude tanker Compassion into her berth.

And then two more are assisting an Evergreen L ship through as well.

Congestion? . . . it’s just another day in the Kills….

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This light is available for only a few minutes twice a day but then only if the rising or setting sun is not cloud covered.  Humidity existed the other morning too, in advance of the impending rain.  I’m not sure why, but late winter/early spring light seems richer as well, although that may be related to directionality.

Alex McAllister approached from the east end of the KVK, and her illumination and that of her background differs

from that of Amy Moran, approaching from the west end of the strait.

Pokomoke followed Alex, about a minute later, but the light has already changed.

 

Andiamo‘s port bow has caught no rays yet, unlike the west side of the dock where she’s tied up.

Meanwhile, Amy moves past and into the Upper Bay.  Lighting like this is certainly worth getting up and out for.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who linked previous installments of this title here.

For good photos, andiamo one of these pre-dawns.

 

 

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