You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Alerce N’ tag.

For your quick peruse today, I offer the inverse of yesterday’s post:  I went to my archives and selected the LAST photo of something water-related each month of 2019. So if that photo was a person or an inland structure, I didn’t use it;  instead, I went backwards … until I got to the first boat or water photo.

For January, it was Weeks 226 at the artificial island park at Pier 55, the construction rising out of the Hudson, aka Diller Island.

February saw Potomac lightering Maersk Callao.

March brought Capt. Brian and Alex McAllister escorting in an ULCV.

April, and new leaves on the trees, it was CLBoy heading inbound at the Narrows.  Right now it’s anchored in an exotic port in Honduras and operating, I believe, as Lake Pearl.

A month later, it happened to be Dace Reinauer inbound at the Narrows, as seen from Bay Ridge.

June it was MV Rip Van Winkle.  When I took this, I had no inkling that later this 1980 tour boat based in Kingston NY would be replaced by MV Rip Van Winkle II.  I’ve no idea where the 1980 vessel, originally intended to be an offshore supply vessel,  is today.

July  . . . Carolina Coast was inbound with a sugar barge for the refinery in Yonkers.

Late August late afternoon Cuyahoga,I believe, paralleled us in the southern portion of Lake Huron.

Last photo for September, passing the Jersey City cliffs was FireFighter II.

October, last day, just before rain defeated me, I caught the indomitable Ellen McAllister off to the next job.

November, on a windy day, it was Alerce N, inbound from Cuba. Currently she’s off the west side of Peru.

And finally, a shot from just a few days ago . . .  in the shadow under the Bayonne Bridge, the venerable Miriam Moran, who also made last year’s December 31 post.  Choosing her here was entirely coincidental on my part.

And that’s it for 2019 and for the second decade of the 21st century.  Happy 2020 and decade three everyone.  Be safe and satisfied, and be in touch.  Oh, and have an adventure now and then, do random good things, and smile unexpectedly many times per day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will spend most of tomorrow, day 1 2020, driving towards the coast.  Thanks for reading this.  Maybe we’ll still be in touch in 2030.

 

Looking, seeing . . . but not understanding makes me wonder if I’ve missed stuff before.  Am I dense, or is that something I don’t recall noticing before.  See it too?

Here’s the rest of the vessel with the (I believe) unusually high mast.  And as large as this bulk carrier is, she seems disproportionately small

as the ULCV passes behind her.  More on that ULCV in another post.

Below is what I meant by the initial question:  notice the yellow quarantine flag?  Is that common?  Is it required for all vessels needing to clear into the US after they arrive in the  sixth boro?  AIS showed that the Monrovia-flagged Alerce N was arriving here directly from Santiago Cuba, (CU-SCU) and that I believe is unusual.

As I said, I miss stuff because I don’t understand what I’m seeing.  And here’s another puzzling sight below . . .

does that mast seem strangely articulated?

It’s the forward mast on Gustav Maersk.  Is it possible that an extension top section has been added?

And since I’m professing a lot of ignorance today . . .does anyone have the definitive explanation for this hulk off Clason Point in the Bronx neighborhood of Shorehaven ?  Over a decade ago, jeff s commented as follows:  “its CHRISTINA or CRISTINA, a failed project…. to be an eatery in Philadelphia but abandoned.”  I’d still love to hear more.

All photos and questions by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,378 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

July 2020
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031