You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Adriatic Sea’ tag.

Here for some context is a post with drawings bowsprite did exactly a decade ago … .

I took the photo below of the same setting.

Whole fleets that existed a decade ago are gone.  For example, K-Sea has been subsumed.  Some boats like Maryland are still in the boro,

others are still on the East Coast but in other fleets like this Falcon.

But still others like Coral Sea and

and Baltic Sea have gone to another continent.

Others might be scrapped . . . like Volunteer and

Bismarck Sea.

Others like Adriatic Sea have crossed over to the other side of North America….

Another fleet subsumed under Kirby–as is K-Sea–is Allied.  Here in July 2009, Sea Raven–now scrapped–and another Falcon have rafted up.   Here’s the link to read in this post:  how Sea Raven was built!!

Hornbeck had a fleet in the sixth boro, with their base in Brooklyn at the current Vane base.   I don’t know what Atlantic Service is currently doing, if anything.

Spartan Service has been sold to a Mexican company,

Sandmaster was still sand mining with this rig.  She was since sold to the Caribbean, and according to AIS, now flies the flag of Niger, which to me says she may be scrapped.

Cheyenne was still red back then, and has since changed colors twice, and exchanged salt water for fresh.  She’s also won the International Tugboat Race on the Detroit River for the past two years.

And this Kristin Poling, 1934 built,  still plied her trade, always a treat to see.

All photos from 10 years ago by Will Van Dorp, who is amazed by the amount of equipment change in the sixth boro in the past decade.

 

. . . and beyond.  Let’s start with August 7, 2008 . . . up by the Iroquois lock of the Seaway.  And Canadian Provider . . .  well . . . in 2013 she was towed to Aliaga as OVI, and scrapped. Note that she’s a straight-decker . . . no self-unloading gear.

August 14 . . . reef-making consisted of sinking subway cars.  These went off Atlantic City.  To see their condition now, click here.

August 16 in the Arthur Kill, Volunteer was off to remake the tow.  Built in 1982, she met the scrappers earlier this year.

August 20 . . . Laura K and Margaret–I believe –have just helped Glasgow Express to Howland Hook terminal.  Glasgow (2002) is still at work, and so are Laura K (in Savannah) and Margaret in the sixth boro.

August 23 . . . Colleen McAllister and Dean Reinauer bring a barge through the Gate, reading for the Sound.  Colleen is now owned by for Port City Tug Company of Grosse Point.  Has anyone seen her in operation?  Dean went to Nigeria aboard Blue Marlin. 

Christine M McAllister stands by in Erie Basin on August 24.  This 6000hp tug is currently working down south of here.

August 27 . .  . the reclusive Susan E. Witte eastbound and Adriatic Sea westbound.  Beyond Adriatic, that might be Aegean.  Adriatic is currently on a tow on the 2000+ stretch of Ocean between Honolulu and Kwajalein!  Can someone confirm this?  Nine years ago, I caught Adriatic near the Bear Mountain Bridge here (scroll).

August 29 . . . Coral Sea westbound, while later in the same day,

the scarcely-seen up here Paul T Moran heads for the Bridge while Maryland approaches from that direction.  Coral Sea has gone to West Africa, Maryland has become Liz Vinik, and Paul T stays mostly around the Gulf.

The Tugboat Races and other contests were on the 31st that year.  Here Justin shows good style hitting that bollard.

HMS Liberty mixes it up with some real history.  Edith went down to Trinidad and the venerable Dorothy Elizabeth (1951) was scrapped the next year. Liberty is still in the sixth boro.

And to close it out . . . the 1907 Pegasus made a showing at the races that year.  She’s laid up on the morris Canal so far as I know.

  

I hope you enjoyed these walks through waters no longer here.

Now my big announcement:  as this posts, I’m on board Grande Mariner for the next seven weeks, Chicago bound.  I will post when I can with what photos I can.  But I’ve done that before.  GWA (Going west again) was my series title last year.  You have to read this one about my role on the vessel.   GW was the title I used in 2016.

Maybe this year it should TGWYA . . . thank god i’m going west again . . .  Anyhow . . . this is my version of a “gone fishing’ sign.

 

 

Happy . . . .  first sunny Sunday in April.  With balmy weather and a full spectrum of light conditions this first weekend of April, just call it the weekend right before summer although it may snow yet this spring  . . .  Whatzit below?  I’ll do a post on Gabby soon; for now that’s all I’ll say.

Adriatic Sea–the most powerful sounding vessel in the boro–and Lincoln Sea, off in the distance lower left both recall for me summers past.

Oleander heads off to Bermuda while Baltic Sea enters the east end of KVK.

Kuroshio Express flushes water through its dolly partons while arriving for its boro-6  appointment, escorted by

Brendan Turecamo.

Patapsco prepares for an assist.

Ellen McAllister escorts in Zim Virginia.

As I watched from pier 66, Melvin E. Lemmerhirt passes between me and the setting sun, which

also burnished the dull gray surfaces of Intrepid.

All fotos taken on good Friday afternoon by Will Van Dorp.

(Note:  See Bonnie’s iceboat video here.  Woohoo!).

New subject:  I went out looking the fotos the day before the snow storm, and here’s what I got in response to a request from my cousin.  It sounded like she asked for fotos of decks in the city . . .  with storied locations as back story . . . many stories, plenty decks.  Caveat:  She mumbles a bit, my cousin.  Well . . . cuz . . .

… for tugboat decks,  here’s Morgan light.  And in the background, a spread of city from Goldman Sachs (Jersey City) on the left to World Trade on the right, with the Empire State Building and the tip of Chrysler in between.

About-to-pirouette product tanker decks, here’s Affinity.

More light tugboat decks, try on Socrates.

You want throaty power?  Consider the decks of Adriatic Sea and DBL76.

For some variety, you might check for a fit with ice-class tanker decks, the festive color and musical name  that is Stena Concert . . . and just in time for Valentine’s Day. Yes?  Well, more decks then.

For doubleskin barge and tug decks, I give you Pocomoke.    I can tell you’re not satisfied yet, cara.  More to come.

Newish tugboat decks with a feline flair . . .  here’s the ex-Jaguar now Kimberly Poling.

All fotos taken on February 9 ( less than 24 hours before onset of the so-called snowcopalypse) by Will Van Dorp.  More decks and then even more, but for now,  it’s lpm.  I’m all tuckered out.

To be continued . . .

Weeks’ Elizabeth has sharp chines.

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A hint of Dr Jekyl/Mr Hyde in United Banner.

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Susan Miller with spud barge, almost full frontal.  Completely full frontal of anonymous gull.

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Oxygen . . .  Don’t those anchor flukes look a bit like . . .  eyelashes?  What was that odd eyelash conversation I had recently?  Kimberly Turecamo to starboard and Laura K Moran to port.

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Adriatic Sea emphasizes the vertical; bow wave defines the horizontal.

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John B. Caddell with very little freeboard.

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Linda Moran: difficult to anthropomorphize once I see the stacks as horns, unless the stalk plus upper wheelhouse plus mast is perceived as unusual headgear.

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Newtown Creek moves in with goal posts.

aaff7What would Rosemary McAllister look like with a Cornell-esque pudding?

aaffrmKT Venture is the first bulker I’ve seen offload salt directly at the Atlantic Salt dock, site of the late August Salt Festival.  More KT Venture soon.

aaffssKatherine Walker approaches, with a buoy in each cheek.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I made my way to the Kills looking for the wayward Ilya, and several times a surfacing cormorant startled me, but alas.  Except for knowing that the origin is Carib, I’d make a lame joke that Ilya should be called a woman-atee rather than a man-atee.  OK, I’m sure it’s been done.  Anyhow, instead, believe it or not, I spotted a motley group of tugs, ships, and boats.  I’ll start with the tugs, both ones I saw and others I remembered.

Bismarck Sea ex-John H. Malik (who was he?) and ex-Gulf Ruler, built 1976.  Notice the oval on the stack awaiting a K-Sea logo.

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Remember the color scheme?  It’s John H. Malik, foto taken winter 2007 in the sixth boro.  Malik was a “founding Roehrig employee who helped to guide and grow the company until he passed away in 2001.”

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Here’s that Roehrig color scheme on Eileen M Roehrig, now North Sea, built 1982 and pictured a week and a half back here.

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Herbert P Brake . . . built 1992 of recycled steel by Bart Brake.  Anyone tell more about the evolution of this tug?

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Foto by Jed of Michigan Service, ex-Kevin Candies, 1981. I love those Gowanus Bay gravel piles in the distance.

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Frederick E Bouchard, 1975.

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Atlantic Coast, 2007!

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Adriatic Sea, ex-Diplomat, 1978.

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Linda Moran, 2009

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All fotos but the two Roehrig boats taken in the past week.

Michigan Service by Jed;  all others by Tugster.  Some info thanks to Harold Tartell.

O . . . oil, petrOleum, fuel, which I’m guessing is the sixth boro’s most valuable cargo; not to say sand, rock, scrap, cement lack value.   Wonder fuel of the past 150 or so years, thanks to what Edwin Drake started.  But what will power home and industry and what cargo will hold greatest value  150 years from now, or a hundred, or fifty, twenty.

Tankers move crude in, and other tankers move petroleum products both in . . . and out.  We export petroleum products –like diesel–due to relative refining capacity, but I’ve no clue where Stena Performance goes when she leaves the Kills for sea.

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Adriatic Sea, southbound on the Hudson near Bear Mountain Bridge, pushes what might be petroleum or might be ethanol.

aaao2Here Taurus pushes a fuel tank.

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As does Curtis Reinauer.
aaaocr Bering Sea has a loaded fuel tank on the hip.

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When a tanker comes into this terminal on the KVK, they hook into hoses like these.

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Here’s the whole set.  Is there a technical term for these, both individual hoses and the entire set?

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Scorship King Douglas, exactly a year old, came in this morning, but it hardly seems loaded to capacity.  Why not?  Tug is Rowan M McAllister.

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When Eagle Atlanta came in, she seemed deeper in the water than King Douglas, but maybe  both were to capacity.  Tug is Marjorie B McAllister.

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What was uncomfortable about writing this post is all the unknowns, and I know I don’t know a lot related to oil.  Yet, my daily life could not happen without oil.  Very few people on the face of the Earth can say they are totally free of a reliance on oil.  It’s an amazing admission, given that it’s a finite resource.  Yet, I think I can safely say that most of us don’t know much about the source, international supply and refining chain, and transportation of items in their lives stemming from petroleum.  Like the gas I put in my car today, I’ve no clue where it lay in the Earth for hundreds of hundreds of thousands of years before–relatively recently–it started the journey toward the gas tank of my car.  And the oil that refining transformed into plastics and chemicals in my house, which pocket beneath the surface did that come from?  If I burned wood to run a steam engine, I might at least know which tree I cut to get this nice hot fire, but oil . . . not a hint.   And it all bothers me because I’d like to know.

Metaphorically, oil as fuel and lubricant . . . it’s potent stuff, without which, nothing good happens.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post, but go back to “Meditations M” . . . on masts.  Les Sonnenmark labeled almost all the units on Yankee‘s mast.  Can anyone help with the topmost one?

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M . . . mast.  I love the wikipedia disambiguation pages, where a range of contexts for words like mast or masthead defies expectation.

Cornell sports its mast toward the stern; running lights there convey information about vessel size, type, and activity.

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Clearwater, a sloop, has a one mast topping out at about 110 feet.

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On City of Water Day, USACE Drift Collection vessel Hayward sports code flags on its mast and a sampling of collected debris on its foredeck.

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Pioneer, a schooner, has two masts, the mainmast topped out at just under 77 feet.

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Sandy Hook Pilots vessel Yankee has units (besides the radar and GPS) on its mast I can’t identify.

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Bunkering tanker Capt Log‘s foremast carries a red flag, signaling fuel.

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So does barge DBL 76.  Mast height on Adriatic Sea is 85 feet, if airdraft equals height of the highest mast or antenna.  I fear I might be blurring a definition here.

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Volunteer, air draft of 114 feet and pushing DBL 105, meets Turecamo Boys assisting Seven Express out to to sea.

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USCG WPB67356 Sailfish, not surprisingly, carries mast gear not readily identified by a civilian like me.

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Miriam Moran, assisting with docking, keeps the upper portion of its mast safely lowered where flaring bows cannot damage it.

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Masts can signal information but of course sometimes signaling is optional or even undesired.  Masts allow things to be seen, but one has to know what should remain unseen.  An effective mast needs strength, and sometimes that means it is flexible.

Both submarines and whaling ships have masts.  For some good fun, check out this six-minute video of  a struggle between Captain Ahab and Moby Das Boot.

Also, just for fun:  How might you complete this sentence:

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Send me your original sentence completions.

days left til the race . . . and Specialist II sprints about,

Laura K flexes line,

Vera K. holds station,

and Dean does what Dean needs to do . . .

Here’s a nose-to-nose contest foto from last year: Nathan E. Stewart v. Lucy Reinauer.

Four is also the number of K-Sea tugs in this foto: from left to right, Adriatic, Baltic, Caribbean, and Aegean.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp unless otherwise stated.

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