Click here for previous photos that come here by way of barrel.  The September 1944 tug Wilmington

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is now Kathy Lynn.

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Dredge Hoffman was built in 1942 and

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retired in 1983 . . . I guess that means scrapped.

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Clatsop was launched in 1908, then called

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Sandpilot, and was scrapped in 1950, before I was born.

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Delano Deland was 1919 built, but was transferred to

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the USAT and I’ve found no further trace.  Anyone have any ideas?

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Many thanks to barrel, who’s sent me more photos like this, and I’ll get around to posting them.

 

Xtian has been sharing photos here for some time.  Now it turns out he and I were in the tiny dorp of Maassluis within days of each other earlier this month, as evidenced by his photo of Furie, which was in the same spot the day I visited here (and scroll).

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I would never have guessed RPA 14 is 31 years old!  Xtian certainly caught the light right here.

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Smit Ebro has been on this blog before, as in this post.

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Equipment on Husky?Make your guesses and on Monday or so, I’ll explain.

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Smit Cheetah and SD Seal . . . doing fire equipment training?

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FairPlay 21 … in between Smit Panther 

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and FairPlay 24 with still more Smit tugs in the foreground.

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Here’s part of the Kotug fleet.  From left, it’s unidentified, RT Evolution, SD Rebel, and RT Adiaan.  Click on each of the three links previous to see how different those three tugs are.

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Smit Hudson has been around since 2008.

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Click here for the entire FairPlay list.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos.

This was the same morning as the photos in yesterday’s post.

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Amy C McAllister was assisting Polaris out to sea, and passing Wavertree‘s wrought iron hull.  Click here for a record on articles about this unique survivor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And since it’s Earth Day, here’s a post from five years ago called Earth on Water Day, especially appropriate since the vessel in the photos above is named for a star in the night sky.

0633 . . . the other morning, a quarter hour after sunrise.

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30 seconds later, at a different angle.

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It’s really about light.

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0832  The good light is gone.  Time to move on to something else.   But wait . .  are those the towers of the new Goethals Bridge along the right edge of the photo?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

And if you missed the new NY harbor dock book info yesterday, here it is again.  The author writes, “I decided to adapt his work into book form. I left the Martin Golden byline so he would get credit for his work. I think the old names on the docks are  best feature. Most of those terminals have gone the way of the dodo, but old timers can still be heard giving security calls at Standard Tank, Copper Docks and other places not there anymore.”

Unrelated:  Did anyone catch Kirsten Grace leaving the sixth boro this weekend?  Was she towing Newtown Creek to its new life?  As of this posting, Kirsten Grace is approaching Wilmington NC.

I’m trying to catch up with the photos you all have been good enough to share on tugster.  The first five here come from some salts up on the Caloosahatchee Canal in Florida.  John Parrish was westbound here, but a week later it showed up in the sixth boro, and by publication of this post, it’s already back to Norfolk.   That’s some sea miles.  Here are some of my previous photos of John Parrish.

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Also, westbound in that Canal, it’s Brittany Beyel.  She’s Beyel Brothers equipment, who have a dramatic photo on that link.

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This one’s eastbound on the Canal with a crane.  I can’t quite make out the name, but the the steersman has great visibility.

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Boomalong was getting hauled out.  Her fine lines made me think she has a storied past, and it turns out she does.  She began life in 1944 in Owen Sound, ON as HMCS Neville, HMCS being Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship.   She’s a Russel Brothers boat that has been around, currently quite far from

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Sault Ste. Marie.

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Thanks to Jed, who previously contributed many photos, here’s a photo and text:  “it’s Stephanie S (1986) returning to Port Canaveral after escorting the bulk carrier VENTURE out of the port.”

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

From Birk Thomas, it’s Barents Sea, now over in Port Newark, having moved for the first time in at least five years.  She looks rough, but I’m hoping there’s a make-over in the works for her.   If she moves again, I’d love to see some photos.

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Here’s my photo of W. O. Decker, docked at Caddell Dry Dock, being worked on  . . . or waiting for Wavertree to make her promenade back to South Street.

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From Jason LaDue, here’s a good view of the underbelly of Grouper, frequently referred to in this blog.  Such belly will be visible until the pool level of the Erie Canal is brought back up for the start of the season.  Jason’s also a frequent contributor.

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Now here’s an oldie but goodie from the other JED.  It shows Labrador Sea and Taurus, significant because now that Taurus is being phased out, Labrador Sea–which had worked on the Mississippi and Gulf for the past few years, has moved back up here into Taurus‘ place, I’m told.   And they’re in K-Sea colors.

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And I said “and more” in the title?  Here’s the more, a new dock book from Tony Acabono.  If it’s your business to know where berth 60 is in Port Elizabeth in relation to berth 61 in Port Newark, you might want to check it out.

Many thanks to the secrets salts and the not-so-secret ones for sending along these photos.

 

All these photos come through Fred Trooster.

Let’s start with the new build Noordstroom which wasn’t splashed until midMarch 2016.  Click here to see the triple-screw vessel at various stages of construction.

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Catharina 7 on the other hand, is from 1958.  Here she passes the Bollard.

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Here’s 1973 built Pacific Hickory.  I’m not sure what’s brought her to greater Rotterdam.

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And we end today’s post with Osprey Fearless, 1997 built.

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All photos by Freek Koning and via Fred Trooster.  Thank you very much.

As a review, here and here were the posts I did on Wavertree going TO Caddell 11 months ago, and here is the series 1 through 4 focusing on Wavertree AT Caddell’s.

Below was she on March 10.  While I was away, she was refloated.

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Below is March 19.  To my surprise, the masts had been unstepped.

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And below was yesterday, April 17, the day when Executive Director of South Street Seaport Museum, Jonathan Boulware,  conducted a tour of the work in progress.  Any errors in this reportage are due to my having forgotten my pen and pad.

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Since the masts–at up to 20 tons each, if I heard that right–were unstepped, their cleanup and refurbishment has begun.

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A house has been built over the whaleback stern to protect the interior spaces.  There is some beautiful birdseye maple panelling in there.

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The underside of the whaleback shows the details of work already completed.

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This is the interior of the upper stern, looking to starboard.

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Access to the cargo areas during the tour was forward.

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I’m eager to see what work gets done to the bowsprit. Check out this post (and scroll) from many years ago when Frank Hanavan and I put fresh paint on that bowsprit.

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This is a new deck . . . the tweendeck.  If you’ve ever eaten on Moshulu in Philadelphia, the restaurant is in this space.

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Wavertree had a tweendeck back in 1895, when she called briefly in the sixth boro, which you can read about here (scroll).  In the photo below, you are looking through a hatch in the tweendeck down into the main cargo hold.

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And here is the main payload space, the cathedral of cargo, looking toward the stern.  On a modern vessel, this would be divided into watertight compartments.

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I can’t say this is the manufacturer, but this is the concept–as I understand it–for this ballast.

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Mainmast will be restepped here.

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Here Jonathan explains the spar work.

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When the project is completed, all these spars will be aloft and potentially functional.

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This cross section of a spar shows the lamination of the wood.  Some of these products are provided–I believe–by Unalam.

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Here are some of the finer spars, along

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with the directions for re-assembly.

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Work going on in the rigging shed included stripping  off the old coatings and recovering the high quality old wire of the standing rigging.

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Worming, parcelling, and serving protects the wire and produces such sweet smells of pine tar.

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Many thanks to South Street Seaport Museum for offering this work progress tour.   Any errors here are unintentional and mine.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks anyone who hasn’t read A Dream of Tall Ships by the late great Peter Stanford would really enjoy the saga of Wavertree‘s arrival in the sixth boro as told in that book.

Traffic backed up.  But in Schiedam it’s because of a drawbridge that’s up to allow a self-propelled barge to back out.  More on that later.  That windmill?  It’s at the Nolet distillery, a Ketel One facility that makes many spirits besides vodka.

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Here’s the 1962 motorvrachtschip, Sentinela,

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squeezing through the lock and

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returning to the main waterway after delivering one of two loads of sand per day to the glass-making plant just up the creek from Ketel One.

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But Hercules is the reason I’m here today.  The big steam vessel event is only a month and some away, so it’s painting and refurbishing time to prepare her.  For a larger set of photos of the preparations, including the mounting of a new mast created out of an old spar by Fred Trooster, click here.

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Here is a set of photos I took of Hercules two years ago at the steam festival.

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The barge being towed here is loaded upside and down below with smaller steam engine applications.

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Click on the photo below to hear how silently she runs.

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To keep her running, the owner Kees Boekweit needs to fabricate some of the parts himself.  He works as a steam engineer over at –you guessed it–Ketel One.   Click on the photo below to see a shorter video of her running on the North Sea.

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Here are the fireboxes under the boiler.

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Here is a cold firebox and

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an empty coal pocket.

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And one last glimpse of traffic on the main waterway here, Friday last Ovation of the Sea arrived in Rotterdam for the first time.  See eight minutes of edited tape here.  By the way, the KRVE boats are the line handlers.  Clearly, though, the tugs steal the show providing what I’ll call a “Dutch welcome,” to coin a phrase.

 

 

This is a 1959 vessel with a rich and varied career.  Click here for photos from a maritime festival last year, and  here (scroll) with info about her sojourn in the US.

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Click on the photo below to hear her run.

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Click here to watch a 20-minute video documenting her meeting a near-sister a few years back.  The sister has been converted into a private yacht. See them together here. The next two photos I took in NL in 2014.

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That’s Fred Trooster and me in the photo below;  thanks Fred for the invitation to come aboard Elbe.

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For some of Fred’s photos of the visit, click here.

Marginally related, I wonder when a similar pilot boat–Wega–will leave its custody in Rio here (and scroll).

Also, marginally related and in response to a question from sfdi1947, click here for interactive navigation charts (waterkaarten or vaarkaarten) for Dutch inland waters, fun to play with but likely not guaranteed for actual use.

 

Now let’s bounce back south of Leiden, west of Rotterdam . . . to Maassluis.  Notice all the gray color upper left side of the aerial below . . .  all greenhouses!  I have lots of fun looking at this part of NL by google map.

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At the center of Maassluis  . . . you guessed it, there’s an island called Church Island,  because

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at its center is a church, completed in 1639.

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I believe the larger vessel here–seen next to the drawbridge above–is Jansje, built 1900. The smaller one . . . I don’t know.

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Check out the wheel

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I’m guessing this was a fish market . . .

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as my attempt (help?) at translation here is “people who sail something well, God takes them with him.”  How far off am I?

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Anyhow, that 1664 building is on Anchor Street and leads to the De Haas shipyard.

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Harbor tug Maassluis was built right here by De Haas in 1949.

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Below is a photo I took of her back in 2014 in Dordrecht.

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Salvage vessel Bruinvisch first launched in 1937, and has returned to a pristine state by the efforts of many volunteers.  You can befriend her on FB at “Bergingsvaartuig Bruinvisch.”

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Notice the white building off the stern of tug Hudson?  That is the National Dutch Towage Museum.  I wanted to visit but came at the wrong hour.  Oh well, next time, Kees.

 

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The next three photos come from John van der Doe, who sent them a few months back.

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Furie is a sea-going steam tug built in 1916.  You can see many photos of her on FB at “StichtingHollandsGlorie.”

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And Hudson, 1939, currently without an engine, narrowly escaped being scrapped.  She spent a number of years in the 60s and 70s as a floating ice-making plant.

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Many thanks to John for these last photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who has more Maassluis photos tomorrow.  One more for now, the day I was there, Furie was over in the De Haas yard.

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And below is a print I found on board Hercules–this coming Sunday’s p0st–showing Furie in a dramatic sea.

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I couldn’t get a photo, but as a monument in a traffic circle in Maassluis, there’s a huge beting aka H-bitt.  Here’s a photo . . . it may be the third one.

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