I’m not exactly sure what HOS Browning does each time she goes to sea,

but she has a lot of deck space, and a derrick to work with.   It turns out I’ve seen ship before down in Port Fourchon eight years ago, when she went by the name Betty Pfankuch.

Specs on this Mexico-flagged vessel can be downloaded and read here. Of interest are the facts that HOS Browning was built in the same shipyard as the new ferries and that the owner and manager is the same company that owns/operates the liftboat Ram VII recently featured here. Also, why is a US-built, Mexican-flagged vessel being used?

This general arrangement  diagram shows the location of a “future hydro-acoustic thru-hull” midships.   I suppose that means that now that 34″ thru-hull has now been opened up.  On that same diagram, would the mud tanks still be in place?  

Given the yellow “cage” near the stern, I’m surprised there’s no A-frame for deploying it, unless it’s been stowed/dismantled while in port.

All photos, any errors, lots of questions, WVD.

Here’s the newest, following directly from 12 for Sandy Ground and 10 for SSG Michael H. Ollis.  Or how about a redux for both

Now unless ferry and tug travel on a maglev frictionless cushion of air when offshore and distant, this is just the fata morgana effect when the vessels are seen a ways off, in this case, about six miles.   In the photo below, there’s a hint that Sarah Dann is riding on a foil board, 

and that the ferry has a dreadnought shaped hull.

Well . . . I’m just messin’.  These were photos of yesterday’s arrival of the third of three new ferries.  Note New York Media Boat out to snap their first welcome photos. Photos of the christening down in Florida happened months ago here.

Here the tow enters the Narrows, and the ocean called the Upper Bay, where Dorothy Day will transport hundreds of thousands and even millions of passengers in the next decades.

Ellen McAllister moves in close, not to provide the assist but rather to convey photographers needing to confirm that the vessel is in fact a ferry for the City of New York.  confirmation provided andn documented.

 

All photos, WVD, who’s ridden aboard MHO but not yet Sandy Ground. 

For reportage on all three newest ferries, check out this report from New York Media Boat here.

 

Janet D, product of 2015, comes in a 67′ x 26′.

 

Ellen McAllister, the oldest here launched in 1967, measures 102′ x 29′.

Marjorie B McAllister, from 1974, is bigger than I imagined . . .   112′ x 30′.

The two McAllister tugs were heading to assist tanker Sakura Belle, 26960 dwt contained within 558′ x 88′, launched in 2011.

Janice Ann Reinauer, the newest tugboat here, came off the ways in 2020.  She measures 113′ x 35′.

 

And finally, doing dredge spoils runs, we have Douglas J, 2004, 110′ x 38′ and

 

Atlantic Enterprise, 1976, and the largest tugboat in this post, measuring 136′ x 40′.

 

All photos, this week, WVD.

Do you have associations with the term “banana boat,” like maybe a song . . . this one?  I’ll bet you’ve sung along.

Get my drift?   Maybe not yet?

I’m no good judge of how common the word “platanos” is in English because it’s been in my vocabulary for too long.

Painted battleship gray and sporting a name like platanos might be considered subterfuge . . . ,

a crude oil carrier getting named as “plantains” . . .  well, bananas.  I know banana boats and this is not a banana boat, even if it comes from that banana-producing area called Point Tupper, right, Jack?

I’m pushing it here, but maybe port of registry should say “maduro,” at least that’s my favorite format.  Maybe the fleet mate is called “papa criolla”?

All photos and warped humor, WVD, whose previous “names” posts can be seen here.

Here’s a new name on this blog:  Posillico, operator of Breakwater Marine and tugboat Deborah Quinn, the 1962 one.  Does anyone know the intended outcome of this work on the Manhattan side of the Williamsburg Bridge?

As it turns out, there’s another tugboat that once carried the Deborah Quinn name.

This Quinn is a large boat:  92′ x 27′.

Sea Lion is a regular on the East River, here heading into Newtown Creek. 

At 65′ x 27′, Lion dates from 1980.

 

Brinn Courtney is fairly new in the sixth boro, and

appears to be keeping quite busy.

The first time I saw her she still had some red livery on her here.

 

 

All photos, WVD, whose previous iterations of this title can be seen here.

 

 

Random framing here, no need for assistance, as that flag might suggest.

Ardelle has been one of my favorites since she was launched from Burnham’s yard in Essex over a decade ago.  But this was my first time to see her schoon about. 

The Burnhams have been building schooners since forever.  If he’s not building new, he’s rebuilding older boats.

You have to love the lines of Ardelle as she sails, curves from the belly of the sail to the pinked stern;  no, that’s not the color.  Here’s brief, journalistic context from shallops to pinkys in North American NE fishing boat design.  

For a little deeper context and art historian illustration, check this Erik Ronnberg/Fitz H. Lane article.

Rides on Ardelle were sold out when I got there, but some day . . .

When Harold Burnham was invited to Washington DC a decade ago to pick up his National Heritage Fellowship award from NEA,

of course, he sailed there, and that was classier than any four-wheeled limo ride. 

I hope you enjoy looking at these photos as much as I do.

If you want more on Harold Burnham, click here. For his wit and his words, check out this clip.

All photos, WVD.

Another TBR is in the books.  Where else can you see very upclose and personal some much-loved boats. I can and might do a post on each of these boats, but for now, just a survey.

Shoofly . . .  complete name is Shoofly Pie. If you want actual detail, click here and scroll;  you’ll see some profile of each of these boats (and others).  All I’ll say about Shoofly is that she’s a WW2 naval vessel evolved into a rat rod (We need a new term for this category.) vessel.  It has also likely sailed the greatest number of places, freshwater and salt.  I’ve photographed this boat before, but somehow, it’s never made it onto this blog.  Some explanation follows.

I frame this as a comparison of push knees on Edna A and J. Arnold Witte.  

How about this as a frame– l to r, Nathan G, Margot, Benjamin Elliot, and Edna A. — involving two-thirds of the NYS Marine Highway boats participating in the event. Then another set of NYS Marine was not present  . . . working . . . .

CMT Otter . . . represented Coeymans.  I learned some modification history of this boat last weekend.  It was once Delta Ram and looked like this.

This vessel is the fourth in the series of Atlantic Hunter boats.  I had photos of Atlantic Hunter IV (under a different name last year) but those photos like those of Shoofly  . . . disappeared.

My Pal Sal is not the latest government boat purchased by NYS Canals, although you might suspect otherwise.  To stray down a tangent though;  Sal has a song named for her;  we really need a popular ditty about canal tugboats . . . any or all of them. Lobby your favorite songwriter or channel your own inner songwriter muse.

W. O. Decker looked spectacular!  Last time I saw her some details were not the same.

Joncaire is several years into her new livery;  she used to be the red of NYPA Niagara River boom maintenance fleet, as seen here (scroll).

Here’s the view from the 4th Street Bridge, and

here from the 2nd Street Bridge.

All photos yesterday, WVD, who got out there before many people were crowding the bulkhead.

I missed a lot of folks who were there because I stayed in the welcome center most of the time, listening to the talks.

Imagine traveling in the East River and seeing  . . . legs!

Seeing these legs spudded down, rudders and wheels on display . . . made me look around for critters!!.  after all, I spent the better than a month this summer in a place with legs and alligators.

Even the logo on the side, the Ram, and

the name . . . Aries Marine . . . was reminded me of western Louisiana.

I suppose they are core sampling.

Juxtaposed with the towering “leg-like” structures of Manhattan’s cliffs,

made me wonder if Manhattan was just a hull that could emerge from the crust and climb up on those legs. As of this morning, Ram VII has moved west and south and is now in the anchorage previously occupied by BigLift Baffin.

All photos, WVD, who points out that Ram VII and Legs III are not the same vessel. 

I first went to the Roundup in 2007.  Here are some photos.

National as for sale that year.  W. O. Decker is an almost-regular attendee. 

Cheyenne, also a regular, was red then.  Since it’s currently working out of Wisconsin, I doubt she’ll ever be back.

Here are some photos from 2007:  fleetmates Margot and Benjamin Elliot.

Push-off contests are exciting:  check out Gowanus Bay and Cornell

In 2008, Frances Turecamo had not yet returned to active service, which it now has as NYS Marine highway’s Frances.

Governor Cleveland was on the wall, along with Wire and Chancellor.

In 2009, Shenandoah was there, and also for sale.

Empire was there. She’s still working out of Connecticut.

In 2010, Empire and Crow had become fleetmates in blue.

Pushboat Grand Erie was there.

Buffalo was there, but has now been sold, and will likely stay in Buffalo. Just offf her stern, note Urger.  Urger has not been at the Roundup since 2016, and is currently laid up/blocked up high and dry above the Oswego River.

x

All photos over the years, WVD.

Moving through the anchorage in Gloucester during the schooner festival, I expected to see a variety of sailing craft, although not one like this. 

Polaris is a Viking replica fishing vessel, built in Anacortes WA to a design at least a thousand years old.

Downeast craftsmanship is evident in Tellina, although I know nothing more about the boat.

 

Ditto Bluefish.

It appears that pilot vessel Eastern Point was serving as a photographers’ launch.  Note the distinctive clock tower of Gloucester City Hall in the distance.

Another classic was out watching the schooners and sometimes stealing part of the show . . .  The Curator.

One of the joys I experience especially from Cape Ann and continuing downeast comes from the lobster boat design . . .  as in Black Sheep and

Life is Good.

Some of the boats were beauties a sailin’

 

but also beauties just at the dock like Lewis H. Story and 

Isabella, both handiwork of H. A. Burnham yard. 

I last spent much time on Cape Ann quite some time ago, as in here, here, and  here. And I last saw Ardelle in the Boothbays.  I can still do a whole post on Ardelle.

All photos, WVD. 

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