Just for ships and figgles . . . have a glance at 155 and at 55 in this series. While we’re reconnoitering the past, here’s 5.

And here’s springtime 2019.  Might this be the last view I get of tug Viking?  Scuttlebutt’s bumped into me saying so. Her first (I believe) appearance on this blog was over 11 years ago here. She had some near twins, but none evolved quite as she did.

FB has this group I really enjoy called Freighters in the Night;  I could submit this one. Jonathan C escorts an MSC box ship out.

Liz Vinik is a former fleet mate of Viking;  I caught her yesterday entering the kills with a Cashman barge carrying barges. Click here for some photos of previous iterations of this boat.

A dark, slow-to-wake morning like yesterday provides lots of points of light.  Here Joyce D. heads out, likely for her railroad work.

Enjoy these contrasts, Linda L. Miller and Hayward, two specialized boats.

Let’s end with a transient, sporadically seen in the sixth boro, a formerly Pacific Ocean Crowley tug . . .  Morgan,  out of New Bedford.

All photos e-watermarked with invisible metadata as taken by Will Van Dorp in the past month.

 

Thanks for your patience; this follows up the post from two days ago.  The port is Boston, the date is November 1960, and the fleet tied up at the T wharf.  Luna, pictured below, is still extant; the others . . . I believe are all gone.

Above in the distance and below, that’s Orion.

I have no ID on this gentleman in Orion‘s engine room, or

this gentleman in the wheelhouse of another era.

Allan Seymour went on to a career as a professional photographer, and he sent me these photos.

Here’s how I first saw two of the boats–including Luna–back in 1987.  Here’s a report on the historic value of Luna submitted to the Boston Landmarks Commission in March 1985.

Thanks for your guesses, both here and on FB.  For the Boston Public Library’s trove of T Wharf photos, click here.   And here is the motherlode, at least 150 photos of Boston tugboats from the Digital Commonwealth collection.

 

Here are some previous posts with photos from Jan.

So here’s the tugboat, just out of the shipyard near the Arctic Circle and at work, the last in a series of five identical anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels bringing more than 23000 hp to the job. This job starts in the Princess Arianehaven. 

And what’s the tow?

And how many tugs does it take?  Here’s Maker assisted by Mutratug 32,  quite interesting in her own right as a Carrousel RAVE tug. Click here for more.

But I digress.  Maersk Resilient (2008) is moving out to the Stella Oil/Gas Field with this assistance. The additional tugs are Multratug 5 and FairPlay 27 and 28.

 

And here Bugsier 3 intrudes on the scene.

All photos taken last weekend by Jan Oosterboer and delivered via Jan van der Doe.

You also have one more day to name the port and guess the date in yesterday’s post.

 

For some of you this will be very easy.  Where was this photo taken and approximately what date?

Photo was taken by Allan Seymour.  He sent more, which I’ll post on another day.

Previously I’ve done a series called ports of [the world], which I’m always looking to add to if you wish to collaborate.

Also, coming up soon, a tugboat rated at 23,000 hp . . . what would that look like?

Way back when, I had some fun abridging “__ Express” names, generating Glex and Sex.   While out at the KVK, then, I thought I’d seen Dublin Express aka Dex before, so I’d take some photos, of the box ship and

the two escort tugs.

And I wondered about the unusual pyramidal arrangement of containers on the stern.

I hadn’t known that Gary Haszko, credited for the next two photos,  was taking photos almost simultaneously from Elizabethport, and aware of something else.

Here the two tugs assist in pinning Dex to the pierced in Howland Hook.  He also knew something else I was unaware of, ie, containers tumbling overboard during a rough ocean transit may have damaged the hull and led to oil spilling into the Kills.  For more on this spill, click here.

After a concerted investigation and clean up effort, USCG cleared the ship to depart. 

Many thanks to Gary for use of the last two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

When Ellen intruded onto my shot of Jonathan C assisting Amstel Stork around Bergen Bend, I first thought she had blown my shots of the assist, but yesterday’s post gave me an idea . . . .  And now that I mention yesterday’s post, here’s another large ATB to throw into the comparison, one that carries 214,000 gallons of fuel.

Compare them.  So here goes:  Ellen entered service in 1967, came to NYC in 2001 and measures 102′ x 29 with fuel capacity of 20,000 gallons.  Currently she brings 4000 hp to her assists.

Jonathan C came off the ways and to the sixth boro in 2016 and the tape calls her at 89′ x 38.”  Her engines generate 6000 hp, drawing from 40,000 gal tanks.

I have earlier photos of Jonathan C, but here’s one from over two years ago.

And since Ellen pre-dates my time in the sixth boro, here’s one I took over 10 years ago.

The photo above by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous iterations of this type.

This morning photo sets it up.  Bert Reinauer passes Galveston as another sun rises.

Bert, launched in 2018 is 118′ x 40′ and mated to RTC 165, a 150k bbl barge.

She’s powered by a GE 8400hp Tier IV set of mains.

Galveston, 144′ x 46′ and seen here two hours past dawn, was launched in 2008, and mated to Petrochem Producer, a 156k bbl barge and powered by a set of Wartsila 9L32 mains generating 12,000 hp.

Pacific Reliance, 122′ x 42′ and launched in 2006, generates 9280 hp from a set of Cat 3612s.  She’s mated to 650-1 with capacity of 178k bbl, I believe.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who hopes his sources are and have been transcribed accurately.

A previous Galveston post can be seen here, and a previous Pacific Reliance here.

 

Stephen B heads light westbound about to pass under the Bayonne Bridge, as

Mary H, especially busy during the cold times of the year, pushes some petroleum product in the opposite direction.  Soon leaves will decorate Shooters out beyond her. There’s a pool hall in Queens by the name Shooters, so to clarify, here are some Shooters history posts from way back.

Mr Jim moves some aggregates, also eastbound out of Newark Bay.

James D. nudges Dublin Express as needed into Howland Hook.

Eric and Capt. Brian A. assist a CMA CGM box ship.

Evelyn Cutler moves some petroleum along the supply chain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s burning high octane himself these days.

Related:  Let me reiterate Lee Rust’s question of a day or so ago:  What is the current working estimate of operating tugs in NY’s sixth boro?  For starters, I think it’s hard to count because of the dynamic, transient nature of traffic.  Just ballparking it without breaking it down by company and enumerating, I’d say 75 at least.  For consistency, let’s say we can count a tugboat as present if it shows up on AIS/VHF/traffic control at least once a month.  I’d love to hear you estimates.

Quick post today . . .

Bert,

Bridgeport,

Helen

Rhea, Mist, and Tide.  I’m eager to see the new Breeze.

And closing the post out, it’s Ava with raked spuds!

All photos by Will Van dorp, who has irons in the fire today.

 

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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