Following on yesterday’s comparison . . . two more tugboats, both active but with entirely different missions . . . I offer for your perusal, key word . . . perusal.

Thomas J. Brown, built 1962 and 60’x 19′ with hull depth of 8′, has a single CAT generating 1000 hp.

Ava M McAllister, christened in 2019 and 100′ x 40′ with a hull depth of 22′, has twin CAT mains generating 6770 hp.

The comparison is ludicrous from a performance perspective;  as I said before, they have entirely different missions.  Some comparisons here would make as little sense as pitting a pro stock race car against a top fuel machine . . .  but those are both drag strip cars.  Here’s another . . . compare a Grand National hydroplane with a Jersey Speed Skiff; they’re both race boats and not landing craft, both well-maintained and precision built for speed within defined parameters.  Likewise, above you’re looking at two tugboats, both of which are working boats in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD, who’s learned the joys of hand washing.

Here’s another interesting comparison and why I said perusal:  Peru, South America with Peru, Indiana, North America with all the other Perus in the US.

 

 

Here from 2013 was the first in the series. Since then I’ve done another series called “tale of the tape,” borrowing from boxing analysis or automotive competitions.  Consider today’s and tomorrow’s post as something similar to what you’d see and read if a car magazine compared a 2020 C8 Corvette with a Tesla Cybertruck, or a 1969 Karmann Ghia convertible, or even a 1948 Willys Overland Jeepster . . .  more on that later.

The photo below I use with permission from Fred Miller.   It carries Oneida name boards;  Oneida is the same vessel as Grouper, the 1912 boat I’ve posted so much about over the years.

Ruth M. Reinauer dates from almost a century later and could not be a more different boat, built for an entirely different mission.  They are apples and oranges, you might say, dogs and cats.  I’ll let you enumerate the differences and similarities for yourself.

Thanks to Fred for the top photo;  the bottom one I took.

Ooops!  It’s later than I thought.

When Cape Moss arrived in the sixth boro the other day, she was 16 days and 10 hours out of Cape Town.

Kirby Moran assisted as she entered the Kills.

Compared with the largest container vessels that come into port here these days, this 2011 ship is modest.

It makes me wonder what goods travel via container between South Africa and the US.  She left the next day for Baltimore, and has now departed there as well.  Think the trade in goods and services between South Africa and the US is greater than $10 billion?  Find your answer here.

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health.

Call this the late winter dance of Janet D and James E. I’ve gotten some email from readers saying they appreciate the photos as a distraction from a world turned upside down.  So I hope bright photos of a dance make a luminous moment in your day.

The two tugs here were arranging a crane barge along a dock, and to my unschooled eyes it appeared the barge was not cooperating.  Either that, or the current was not cooperating.  But enough of my words;  watch for yourself.  These photos were taken over a half hour duration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hat tip to the crews who seemed to end up with that barge precisely where they wanted it.

All photos, WVD, who used to be just a hermit but now is a practiced social distancer.

More low verbal density from a weak wifi signal . . .  in my social media distanced outpost.  But I do wonder about the story here:  Liz Vinik with a barge of small response boats beside Barry Silverton with Fight ALS.

HMS Justice has the orange centerline, but still a name with hMS . . .

Brooklyn pushes DBL 27.

Lucy Reinauer pushes RTC 61.

Stephen B, here looking like Ste, heads for the next job.

And finally, Cape Henry appears to be preparing to tied up to her barge.

All photos, WVD, who encourages all actions aimed at staying healthy.  I accidentally shook hands with some this morning.

 

Today’s post will have low verbal density, but I could not pass up noting the arrival of a vessel named Captain Haddock, especially since it’s a bulk carrier with a salt cargo, not a fishing boat.

This is just a hint; it is a container vessel but with many refrigerated plug ins, it might just be transporting some citrus.

 

No comment.

Put rail on water and you’ll see graffiti.

 

Let’s end this post with more context on Captain Haddock.

All photos, WVD.  Stay healthy.

I won’t ask which tug that is, featureless though it is, given the title.  I’m actually astonished that after some 4450 posts I’ve not yet dedicated a post to this tugboat.

That’s Brendan Turecamo on starboard bow and Miriam Moran on port.  Brendan is four years older than Miriam, which was christened in November 1979 and has worked in the sixth boro ever since.

 

She’s named for the  . . . Miriam Moran, wife of the Moran President from 1964 until 1987, if I read the archives correctly.

 

She has appeared on this blog hundreds of times;  one of the earliest was in Random Tugs 001,  back in 2007 when I still located relevant text below photos, unlike above them, as I do now, since one reads from the top . . .

Hat tip to this hard working tug, and her sister Margaret, two of the five tugs of the Dorothy Moran class. Spot differences?

I see at least one, but no doubt there are more both inside and out but visible only to the connoisseur.

All photos, WVD.

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

Whatzit?  Or, howzit?

It’s just a male bufflehead caught in mid-dive.  This is the winter bird of the sixth boro . . . Hmm . . .  maybe we need a whole set of sixth boro symbols.  I’m open to your suggestions for tree, rock, beverage, flag . . .  the works . .

Sometimes while sitting by the bay, motionless and deep in thought, I am approached by birds doing what they do quite nearby, like this one of a set of mourning doves,

this great blue heron I snuck up on,

and even these ring-billed gulls seen this way and

that.

I could be wrong about some of these identifications, but I’d call this a common loon in winter plumage. Several times I’ve seen these but heard the crazy loon sounds that serve as confirmation.  Ever wonder what a dozen and a half loons together sound like?   Ever wonder what a humans soundlike to loons?  Sorry, I can’t help with the loon perspective.  Of course, there are people who speak like birds . . .

 

And in mid-February this year I saw a whole tree full of these robins, coming up north in a flock early because maybe they knew as the woodchuck did that winter would be mild.

I started with a bufflehead, and as a reminder that I’m open to suggestions for natural symbols of the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD, whose previous birds and critters posts can be found in those links.

This series goes way back to 2007, when I erroneously thought a song existed called “Paris in springtime.”  My deciding it must be a faux memory did not prevent me from doing a bunch more posts, with variations like “pairs in winter,” like today’s posts.  It still is winter.  And there is a movie with a somewhat similar name;  a fun trailer can be seen here.

Let’s start with Sarah Ann and Thomas E. pairing up to get a crane off to Sims.

 

Ellen and Ava team up to see a small container vessel into the kills.

 

Meagan Ann and Emily Ann each bring a scow for the filling, likely with scrap?

 

And for a variation, a mixed triad of Margaret, Alex, and Ava return from assists.

All photos, WVD, who wishes you happy springish late winter and successful social separations.

 

 

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