Thanks to Ashley Hutto, I started on this path a month ago.  Notice the equipment just beyond the H-bitt and slightly toward the capstan?

The same equipment can be found on this $161 million stationary vessel on the East River:  the orange ring and net seems to be to the right and several balls can be seen lower left.

Here’s the same on this

ship called Kestrel.  I suppose the ship is named for the backboard?

And notice this one on Ocearch just above and beyond the lighter blue tent?

Here’s another . . . standard version on

this LNG tanker Atlantic bound at the Cocoli locks….

A slight permutation gets us to “bulls on halls…”    Well, we’ve had cows here and here . . .   Has anyone seen livestock vessels in the sixth boro recently?

Thanks to Ashley for the first shot;  the others by Will Van Dorp.   Here are some more hoops.  Remember this “cardiac gym” on Apache?   I enjoy looking, expecting to find surprises everywhere.

 

 

Let’s start here as a quiz.  Name that tug?  Answer follows.  The blurriness is a clue to the vintage . . . of the photo.  More oldies at the end of this post.

Here’s an unusual treatment of name boards.  Can anyone clarify why the 6140 hp J. George Betz is the only Bouchard boat wit this treatment?

 

I suspected it was Betz when I noticed her here, but had to look more closely to verify.  I believe this is the first time for me to label–if not see–the B. No. 235 barge.

Gulf Venture . . .I’ve not often seen this 5150 hp boat light.  Question:  Does Gulf Venture currently work for John Stone?

Ernest Campbell departs MOTBY here, her mast perfectly shown against the Putin monument . . .  he did come here for the dedication.

Gabby L. Miller .  . she’s not been on the blog in a while.   This 660 hp tug gives the right push at the right time in the right place sometimes.

The 2000 hp Eric R. Thornton dates from 1960, making her the oldest tug in this post except

More oldies.  This is Marion, although I have no information on where and when it was built.  Marion was one of two tugs operated by Disston and June Marine Construction, previously called Burcroft Marine Construction Company. Their other tug was Constructor. Marion sank in Weedsport, although I can’t find that date.

This tug may still be afloat.

It’s Morania No. 8 pushing Morania No. 170 barge.  Has anyone seen her in Port-au-Prince Haiti?  I wonder if this was a company slogan or something displayed more widely.  I’ve never heard it.

The mystery tug, believe it or not, is Buffalo, somewhere in the Erie Canal.  Click here for a few good photos of Buffalo taken by Tim Hetrick back in 2014.   Maybe someone can put a date of the photo by taking into account the color.

All photos except Buffalo by Will Van Dorp.   All the oldies here are by Steve Wunder.

 

Growing up in a beautiful rural place, I never imagined some day living in the largest megalopolis on the US.  But here we are; I live in a concentration with over 50 million others.  That many people and consumers together has implications.  Click on the map to see source.

Here’s how a plethora of goods comes in . . . .

Ten years ago, single vessels this large never transited the sixth boro…

Just yesterday, no fewer than three of these ULCS found themselves in port, and they’ll soon push today’s limits.

So I have my own word for them:  megaboxforus.  Megaboxforuses . . . could be the plural.

 

 

 

And they change hands . . . Edison not long ago was Maersk Edison.  Maersk possibly traded in a 1200′ for a 1300′.

See the paint outs?

 

This morning Cosco Shipping Peony–the first of its class–arrived just before adequate light for photos.  I hope some one gets photos during its first sixth boro stay.

And once the boxes leave the ULCS, they go into the hinterland on steel rails or–less efficiently–on a single chassis pulled by a tractor.

These statistics are quickly becoming obsolete.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

More than half a year ago, Buffalo was auctioned off, and in my circles, no one knew what had become of her.  Some were speculating she had gone for scrap.  She lay against the wall in the dry dock all winter, but when spring came, she disappeared and some thought she had been scrapped.

It turns out she recently headed for Buffalo, and is currently making her way across the state of New York.  These photos from Jason LaDue show her westbound at Lock E28A in Lyons NY.

She ran on her own power at the RoundUp in 2012, but right now her power unit is this crew boat.

 

Here she passes through the center of Newark.  The weather now is so much more comfortable than a week ago.  Can you read the banner atop the deck house  . . .”bringing the Buffalo back to Buffalo.”  Yes!!

Here’s a closer up of the banner showing the Lardon Group web address, and

on the push boat, Union Concrete . . . .

Now on to the next town .  . Palmyra, and the next three photos were taken by Jim Hastings.

 

Tomorrow, I gather, the flotilla continues westbound.

And finally, two more from Jason LaDue.  As to the slogan on Waterford’s logo, I’d raise the point that just as Waterford is a gateway to the New York State Canal System, so is Buffalo, and so are Whitehall, Troy, and Oswego, for that matter. It just depends on your direction and coordinates of entrance.

As attractive as this shot is, my guess is that the boats have already moved west.

Many thanks to Jason and Jim for taking these photos.  I’ll be looking for Buffalo in Buffalo this August or September.

For many more photos of her taken some years back by Fred of tug44, click here.

 

Private planes can’t be fun for slow and prolonged travel, and RVs–unless I could drive something wild like these or a Fuller— leave me cold, but these yachts seem a popular way to see the world . . . at least one of the loops.   What I might enjoy more than a loop is a crossing, a la William Least-Heat Moon, with a smaller and more adaptable vessel.

I was not stalking the yacht below, but here I caught Ann Marie Rose entering the Upper Bay on June 8,

under the 9W bridge in Kingston on June 16, and then

on July 1 in Little Falls, NY.  Maybe I can find them on AIS.  She’s 48′ and registered in Virginia.  I’d say they travel at an appropriate pace, around 200 miles a month.

Copesetic is 46′ and registered in Chesapeake City, MD.  It’s maybe owned by someone with the last name Cope?  I’ve never been inside a catamaran motor yacht.

Ocean Star is truly from Ketchikan, AK and headed eastbound in the Erie Canal. From the West Coast they traveled by truck until they splashed into the Mississippi in Minnesota.

You can tell Scott Free (61′) is in the Canal by the fact that her radar dome and all that supports it is set on her nose, to make the low bridge.  I did a double take upon seeing her, imagining this was a boat inspired by Blount’s Grande vessels.

The natural beauty of the Canal envelopes these three cruisers as they

make their way west to share lock E-18.  The green boat in the middle appears to be a 42′ Kadey Krogen;  a friend has done two crossings of the Atlantic with his, and is now off California, after starting in Panama about a year ago.

I can’t tell you much about Sláinte, but she was pretty in the dawn light.

And this one . . . Boatel I  was headed to Toronto for the season.  It’s a floating accommodation, not to be confused with Botel, where I stayed back in 2014.  Scroll here to see my photo.

Anyone know where she spent the winter?   Maybe it’s “no tell motel.”

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Did you hear about Peak Pegasus, the vessel racing to get US soybeans into China before retaliatory 25% tariffs are slapped on?  More on Peak Pegasus at the end of this post.

Well, these two container ship had no need to hurry into the sixth boro, yet here’s something I’ve never seen before . . . two container ships entering the Narrows in quite close succession.

Obviously the passage accommodates all, but still . . . a new sight for me, the reason I return here again and again.

See QM2 in the distance to the right?  I caught her first arrival here 11 years ago.  Dawn was too late for me to catch it.  That ominous sky got me thinking . . . storm clouds.  Locally I was just concerned about getting spots on my lens.  But then I thought about the story of Peak Pegasus, the impending trade war.  I could see those as storm clouds, and shipping . . . this is a front line, like every seaport in the US.

Take the value of all the imported cargo on Maersk Buton and

add to it the value of whatever’s on OOCL Berlin . . . and every other ship entering a US port for the foreseeable future and add the product of that and  .25 . . . the sum’s rising.  Ditto  . . . whatever is on Bomar Caen–headed for Colombia–might just be less attractive if .25 gets added to the price of those goods.  Maybe Colombia is not affected.

I’m by no means an expert in much, and please educate me if I’m wrong, but these storm clouds seemed appropriate this morning.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who first read the name of the Maersk ship as butoh, which would have been much more interesting.

Peak Pegasus plowed at top speed to make port, but  . . . she failed.  More here.   Here’s a story from the same vessel from a few months back.

Maybe I should post this under “caption contest,” but here are some photos worth contemplating.  The first comes from Patrick Gallagher.  It seems that this yacht has just come off a container vessel and that’s an automobile of some sort under the tarp on the bow.  I know nothing more, although I’d really like to hear “the rest of the story,” as Paul Harvey used to say.

The next two photos come from Jason LaDue.  I’d put this under the category of “we don’t need no stinking’ tugboat.”

Given the tarp, stool, and head . . .  I’m thinking they need a hot plate in lieu of a full galley.

Many thanks to Patrick and Jason for these photos.

 

 

Let’s start out at Little Falls NY, above Lock E-17, where Jay Bee V had just departed and was now delivering the Glass Barge to the wall there.  Notice C. L. Churchill along the left edge of the photo.

Here above Lock C-7, it’s Margot.

On the Hudson River, tis is my first closeup view of Liz Vinik, formerly Maryland.

Westbound on the East River, it’s Sea Wolf moving uncontainerized thrown-aways.

Farther east, it’s Hudson with a fuel barge,

and meeting her, it’s Morgan Reinauer with the same.

Notice here, looking toward the Queensboro Bridge, Morgan and Hudson.

Here at the Spuyten Duyvil Bridge project, it’s  Dorothy J.

and to close this post out back on the Hudson, it’s Elizabeth, moving Weeks 533.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It thrills me that use of fireworks to celebrate our Independence dates to this note by John Adams to his wife Abigail:  ” … the occasion should be commemorated ‘with Pomp and Parade, with [Shows], Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.’ ”  The first commemorative Independence Day fireworks were set off on July 4, 1777; they were all orange.

My best shots of boats and “illuminations” were here in September 2014, and

even better here in July 2012.

Since I quote Adams, here’s an engraving of him, Franklin and Admiral Lord Richard Howe meeting at the Conference House on Staten Island in September 1776. The house was built in 1680, and Christopher Billop, the resident at the time of the Revolution, was a Loyalist who fled to Canada after he was captured and imprisoned in 1779.

But I digress, thanks to Adams, we use fireworks to celebrate today.

Photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.  Engraving by Alonzo Chappel. 

 

That declaration . . . it’s good to read it now and again, especially these days.  And since I choose to post at noon, this post will be up for half the holiday, even if the holiday is NOT the actual date the document was signed.

In civilian life, flags are freely displayed, without compulsion.  The current US flag is the 27th design.  Careb also flies the AGLCA banner and the flag of New Mexico, a location impossible to navigate to.

 

Tug Churchill and sailing canal boat Lois McClure each fly a flag, every day under way and not just on holidays.

The signers–SOME of the delegates to the Second Continental Congress–remained committed in their discussions despite their many disagreements.   A number of delegates would not sign. And the country has been the greatest possible ever since, mistakes notwithstanding.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

Previous flag posts can be read here.

 

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