I stopped by around midday today.  Trevor had been alongside all morning.  I presume this was loading cargo support materials. Here’s the last post I did where Trevor appeared.   These first two photos are taken from Brooklyn looking across at Staten Island.

Time is of the essence here, but I’ll bet working in the 90 degree F temperatures was draining.

Here’s the prep as seen from Fort Wadsworth.

Reynolds Twin Tube appears to be standing by with supplies for crew and possibly spares.

 

Let’s hope tomorrow proves an eventful day. . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Yesterday at 13:31, Combi-Dock III is in sight . . .

14:04, she approaches the VZ Bridge . . .

 

I don’t know how many crew are on board, but soon they’ll be quite busy until they depart with their cargo . . .

 

Peking–I imagine–will float in here, as through a dropped tailgate on a pickup.

Who is this Peking, you ask?  Peking is a 1911 barque and  veteran of the nitrate trade from Chile around Cape Horn to Europe that has been featured in dozens of tugster posts . . .  but take the time to check out these two:   this post with photos supplied by Joe–from his uncle– show her under sail midAtlantic in 1929 or ’30 . . .   and this post showing her 1975 arrival in the sixth boro aka New York City, on a towline.

I expect Thursday will be spent arranging the cradle and ballasting the ship so that Peking can float aboard on Friday.  As to a little info about Combi-Dock III, click here to see her under construction in 2008-09.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who may post a second time later today.

In case you missed the video of car ferry  Badger‘s arrival one day in late June, it’s here.

Rainy weather had caused a lot of runoff, turning the water two shades of Lake Michigan.  And once I got thinking about weather, and the word got stuck in my brain along with this absurd video clip called “badger song” from my early days on the internet, my downward spiral began, like …

badger,

truckers,

tankers,

trucker, tanker, and forester,

camper and forester,

runner  (vehicles are driven off Badger by these shore crew who run from one car to the next),

more runners (from my 2012 trip and these taken in Ludington, with Spartan in the background),

camper (I hope you’ve caught the pattern by now),

trailers,

charger . . .   (by this time I realized fighting the spiral had become hopeless . . .)

Oh well, maybe you had to have been there to catch my giddiness . . .

But!  In an attempt to resurrect my reputation as a sane blogger, you might have noticed that in the first sentence of this post, I referred to Badger as a “car” ferry.  Like me, you might have thought of  four-wheeled rubber tired vehicles, but–in the manner of Detroit River ferry called Detroit in this wonderful SHORPY image–

Badger and sister ship Spartan had different origins, used to have rails built into the deck . . .  as you can see here.

Industries come and go, as does supply chain and people-moving  infrastructure . . .  Here’s more, and I’m not going to turn political here, but this is context .  . . .  Click here for more SHORPY car ferry photos.

Here’s the post I did after visit to Badger from 2012.  And here’s a more recent one showing her underwater layout.

Here was the first post with this title, from almost 9 years ago!  But for the first image of Cheyenne, I can go back to February 2007 here.

Anyhow, less than a half hour after leaving the dock in Port Newark, she rounds the bend near Shooters Island,

departs the modified Bayonne Bridge,

exits the KVK for the Upper Bay and North River . . .

and a half day later, shows up in Poughkeepsie, as recorded by Jeff Anzevino and

Glenn Raymo.

Jeff and Glenn, thanks. Uncredited by Will Van Dorp.

And Cheyenne, tugboat of the year but not present then at the 2015 Tugboat Roundup in Waterford . . .  she’ll be there this year on her way to a new home a good 1000 nm to the west.  Here and here are my photos from 2015, which already seems long ago.  I’ll miss the Roundup this year because I’ll be eastbound on the waterways from Chicago, but there’s a chance we’ll pass Cheyenne on the way!!

Is she the last Bushey tug to leave the sixth boro?  If so, it’s a transition in an era or something . . . .

Safe travels and long life in the fresh waters out west.

 

 

OK . . . I prematurely published it, so here it is.

Recognize this tanker . . . once a regular in the Hudson River but out in other waters the past few years . ..

I was thinking this post could be called

Afrodite . . . shares the waterways. A sport fish boat, a USCG patrol boat, and migrating(?) swans . . .

escorted past the Bayonne Bridge, where

Margaret Moran escorts her in as other traffic passes …

and Brendan Turecamo helps out . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Many thanks to William Lafferty, who has things to teach me about research.  He sent along this Agfa black&white photo version of

this photo below that I put up a few days ago . . .  Here’s what he writes:  ” the mystery vessel at Milwaukee is the Leona B., built by and for the Advance Boiler and Tank Company (founded in 1919 and still with us, although located in West Allis now).  I believe Advance still owns the property on Jones Island where you saw it.  It was used for welding repairs at Milwaukee and nearby harbors.  The image shows it while still afloat and operating, a mere forty years ago.  I believe it was purchased to be converted to a tug to shuttle coal barges in Milwaukee harbor, but proved unsuitable for whatever reason for the conversion.  The firm bought the Hannah tug Mary Page Hannah (third of that name) and renamed it Leona B. for the coal shuttle.

When I research Jones Island, I learned of a new (to me) ethnic group who settled here as a fishing village:  Kashubians.  Here’s something of Kashubians from an extraordinary obituary for a son of the island . . .

In my fishing tug post the other day, here was a photo of Islander.  William writes:  “Attached is a photograph (Agfachrome!) I took of the Islander in 1992 at Sheboygan while it was still working.  It appears to have been ridden hard and put away wet quite a few times.  The Islander, launched 16 November 1936 and took off for Washington Island two days later where it fished for Albert Goodmander,  was a product of the Sturgeon Bay Boat Works, earlier called the Palmer Johnson yard.  It had a 45-bhp Kahlenberg (and maybe still does).”

Looking at Islander 1992 and 2017, it’s hard to imagine the type of sport luxury yachts they produce today (in the Netherlands!)

One could spend lots of hours looking at and for the siblings (like Bascobel, which saw its end of the graveyard featured in Graves of Arthur Kill in Rossville) of John Purves, product of the shipyard in Elizabeth NJ across from Howland Hook.  William writes:  “The regal John Purves thirty-eight years ago at the Bultema dock (now Andrie) at Muskegon.  It was named for Captain John Roen‘s right hand man, and every owner afterwards kept the name out of respect for Mr. Purves, a Sturgeon Bay boy.”  Here’s more on Roen.

Finally, once more . . . I’m looking for more images of the McAllister boat below.  ” M. L. Edwards  was built at Chicago in 1923 as a 60-foot steel steam-powered coastal freighter for upper Lake Michigan service, and served for McAllister for about forever. ”

Credit for photos as attributed.

Thanks a lot, William.

 

Not surprisingly, a lot of people were out on the boro the other morning:  speeding out to fish,

descending from Vukovar–a name slipped out of the news–into the crew boat Emily Miller,

sitting watch past BW Shinano,

ditto . . . aboard CMA CGM Tancredi,

and preparing the heaving line . . . .

 

Is that c-ship so long that the curvature of the earth can be seen along its waterline?  Actually that’s Brendan Turecamo moving SSS barge New Jersey over to Red Hook, I believe.

And a little earlier, although I place it last here, Shawn Miller pushed a trickster barge past ConHook Range.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve mentioned Heraclitus before here . . . he’s the guy credited with observing that you never step into the same river twice.  It’s certainly true about going to a the Kills with a camera.  Take Saddleback . . .  never seen it before I thought  . . . although on longer reflection, yes I had here, doing what it’s designed and built for back in 1992 and in the North River back in the winter.  Stern view just looks different than profile.

As my eye followed Saddleback to the east, I noticed this “neck,” and for some instants wondered what was afoot, or afloat at least.

I didn’t have long to wait . . . it was Weeks 526 pushed by Shelby, Norfolk bound as it turns out.

Mr Russell usually stays upriver, but shuffles are sometimes necessary  . . .

I suppose some of this equipment will end up in Boats and Harbors once the TZ project is complete.

Gelberman  . . . at first I thought she was headed here to fuel, and that would have surprised me because I’d never noticed that before, but when the fishing poles came out,

I realized they had a different objective, one

that boats like this benefit greatly from.

I’ll end this foot-in-the-water with Gabby, pushing a small barge with reinforcing forms.

 

More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And finally . . . a research request:  a friend is looking for photos of McAllister workboat M. L. Edwards.  Birk writes about it here, and Bob Mattsson includes this photo

of it here.

 

Harvey Hadland–a Brooklynite– and Bob Mackreath–a Long Islander–created the definitive site on fish tugs here . . . and Bob currently carries on Harvey’s legacy.  Next time I get up to Lake Superior, I must visit Bayfield and linger in the Apostle Islands, as the trip recorded here came with too many time constraints.

One part of the fish tug site discusses their evolution, here.  If you have Facebook, watch fish tugs break ice in pairs here.  Actually type “fish tugs” into YouTube, and you might get this.  Click here for my previous contributions to the topic.

I organize this starting from oldest and known, at least to me. Of course, many of you know more.  Here’s what Hadland/Mackreth say about Margaret below:  “Built by Peterson Boat Works in 1934, for Joe Schmidt, Algoma, Wis. The 45 ft. x 12 ft. wood hulled vessel was equipped with a Kahlenberg oil engine (size not known), installed at Algoma, and taken from another boat. Schmidt later sold her to Ed Zastrow, Algoma. Again sold to owners in Door County the boat was last operated out of Baileys Harbor, A severe storm in January 1975 resulted in heavy damage to the boat while at a dock at Baileys Harbor. Since that time the boat has been used as a centerpiece in several museum displays.”  Yup, Algoma WI is where I saw it,

along with what might have been a museum . . .

 

but when I walked around town, I found it again . . . on a mural.  To me, this says people in this town want this stories of this boat remembered.  It’s been years since I moseyed along the Michigan side, but Fishtown might be a place where remembrance of heritage fishing is even more elaborate.

Islander (1936) lives on as an on-terrafirma display in Sheboygan.  I was pressed for time when I arrived here, so I got no close-ups. For some Seger family accounts of Islander–even some poetry with the word Kahlenberg used–click here.

Oliver H. Smith, built right in Kewaunee WI,  where I saw it, dates from 1944 and appears to be still fishing.  I sought out Lake fish for meals on this trip and had great whitefish, walleye, and perch.

Nels J (1956?) is hoping to reopen in Duluth’s Canal Park, but as of late June, I couldn’t sample any of the wares . . .

Here’s a mystery boat.  It had just come in from a whitefish run and the crew was busy, and all they’d say was that it was a repurposed research boat.

It has some fish tug lines with a “convertible” afterdeck covering.  It matches up with none of the Great Lakes historical “science ships” here. Any help?

Here’s another Lake Superior commercial fishing vessel, but I can’t find Arlene A in the listings I know.  She has a look in common with the deadrise boats of the greater Chesapeake.

The fish tug nearest the sixth boro–I believe–is Eleanor D (1948), below, which worked out of Oswego from 1958 until 1978 and now on the hard at the H. Lee White Maritime Museum in Oswego.  Source of the photo below is this online Oswego history.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

If you’ve never tried lake fish, don’t hesitate.  Someone in Munising that thrills with under the water debris suggested I get my whitefish here, and I can vouch for the place and the fish.   That someone (and crew)  does a great job helping you see beneath the water.  If you want more in the clear waters, see Chris Doyal‘s work.

except “random” here  just means in the order that I encountered them on my all-too-short gallivant around Wisconsin.

In Sturgeon Bay, I finally saw the 149′ x 27.8′ John Purves, built in Elizabeth NJ in 1919, definitely retired now but looking great as part of Door County Maritime Museum.  John P. Holland had some connections with Patterson and the shipyard in Elizabethport NJ–right across from Howland Hook terminal, as well, where the USN’s first series of submarines was built.  See some here (and scroll).

Stern to stern with Purves is Donny S, formerly ATA 230, G. W. Codrington, William P. Feeley, William W. Stender, and Mary Page Hannah.  She’s 135.5′ x 33.1′ and is said to hail from Cleveland.  She was building a Levingson Shipyard in Orange TX.

I gather she was once part of the Hannah Marine fleet, as in here.

Quite a number of Selvick tugs rafted up here as well:  right to left:  William Selvick, Jacquelyn Yvonne, Sharon M Selvick, Cameron, Susan L, and William C. Gaynor. … a bit too tightly packed for good photos.

Farther south in Kewaunee, WI, I stumbled upon Ludington, a 1943 Jakobson Oyster Bay tug just a month older than Nash, restored to Navy gray and part of the exhibit in Oswego NY’s H. Lee White Maritime Museum.  Lots of tugboats–current and older–in the sixth boro hail from Jakobson’s, now all gone.

In Milwaukee, I was fortunate to track down tug Wisconsin.  Now that might seen less than ordinary until you learn she dates from 1897 and still works!!  She’s gone through more names than there are Great Lakes but here she is.

Off her stern Minnesota and Superior (almost invisible) are rafted up.  The 1911 Minnesota is a year older than Urger but still profitable.  Superior was launched in 1912 in Manitowoc and still works in ship assist and lakes towing.

I’ll need some help on this one, high and dry just beyond Superior.  For some of the more GL tugs previously posted here, click here, here,  and here.

Joey D is a workboat boat, 60′ x 20′ launched 2012, built in Cleveland.

My guess is that this is the boat Joey D replaced, but that’s sheer conjecture.  It’s not conjecture that this bow’s seen some ice and made contact.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to get back to the Great Lakes basin and see more.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,152 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

July 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31