As we head up the Bay to Baltimore, we pass many things, including Island Pilot,

Kismet from a port I once knew well,

 

Sea Crescent,

Capt. Henry Knott,

 

je ne sais quoi,

Indian Dawn and some others,

Miss T, 

and some surprises at the John W. Brown dock:  Z-One, April Moran, and James R. Moran.

And we’ll leave this post here with arrival in Baltimore.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the reference on Gallatin’s 1808 report proposing the ICW.

This post focuses on the in-port stay in Norfolk, starting with Thunder and

showing her in context with Storm and Squall.

Since we’re starting with small tugs, check out Beverlee B at work and

light.

Hoss is a sister of the sixth boro Patricia, here light and

here at work.

To close out, it’s Ann Jarrett,

Maxwell Paul Moran and Clayton W Moran, 

Emily Ann McAllister,

and a whole slew of boats I’ll get back to later, here leaving the East branch of the Elizabeth river.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, in Norfolk.

Leg 3 took us from Beaufort NC to the Elizabeth River, Norfolk.

Again, when I’m back, I’ll catch up on identifying in words what you can identify yourself.

 

Morehead City is a deepwater port.

 

 

After some rough weather spent in port, the shrimp fleet heads back to work . . . parade style.

Yup . . . I like it.

The long bridge at the top end of NC.

I can’t wait to play with night images I took as we approached Norfolk.  Just enough water vapor in the air traced the line of the spot light as we confirmed location buoy by buoy . . . 0300.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Leg 2 runs from Georgetown to Beaufort NC.

We did from Southport to near Wrightsville Beach in Gallatin’s ICW, past this bucolic campsite and

surf camp.  See the surfer’s legs lower left?

We headed into Beaufort/Morehead City passing this sailboat outbound.

Fun!

That’s bulker Aurora in the offing.

And a banker horse and a Great Lakes Reggie G (Booster No. 4) . . .

 

It’s was Derby Day and these equine could not care less. Bravo independence!

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

x

xx

 

Gallatin wrote a report in 1808 proposing canals, an intercostal waterway and more.  This series is a tribute to him starting in Charleston and northbound.

When I write on the run, I’m taking no time to figure out what I’m seeing, like this beautiful hull … in the Ashley.

Athena reportedly just sold for $50 mil!

As we head out, storm clouds gather again over Fort Sumter.

 

We arrive in Georgetown under sunny skies.  Anyone know these tugboats?

All photos a few days back by Will Van Dorp.

 

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

Thanks to Erich Amberger for these photos up near Mechanicville.  According to Erich, this could be the first boat on the canal this season.

Lock C-2?

 

And it’s the mighty Betty D, which I’ve caught here only once.

One of my goals for this summer is to travel the Champlain.

 

Many thanks to Erich for whetting my appetite.

 

Here are more photos from May 1.  Betsy Ross is a product of  Yank Marine in Tuckahoe, New Jersey.  

Here, r to l, are three generations of sixth boro people movers . . . Betsy Ross, Garden State, and the new NYCFerry known as H202 for now.  Garden State was launched in 1994.

H202 crosses the bow of the mighty Helen Parker.

By an hour later, Betsy Ross is already roaring back from across Raritan Bay.

Closing shot is H202 wheelhouse as seen from the upper passenger deck . . . approaching the Marine Parkway Bridge.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is preparing to head back northward on the ICW, which I’ll call Gallatin’s Ditch.

I read the sign and decided to

wait until the greeters had left and then

bought a round trip ticket at Pier 11 for less than what I’d pay for a bagel and coffee

and got on the next ride to the Rockaways.  If you want to know specs and dimensions and such right now, click here.   Or wait, and guess who built the power plant and what the passenger capacity is, and I’ll tell you some of that at the end.

After a stop at the Brooklyn Army Terminal, we zoomed out towards the VZ at 25 knots, past Coney Island,

through the goalposts at Marine Parkway, and

to the new Rockaway dock,

where shuttles gathered or distributed potential passengers.

Then it was back to Pier 11 in the

pea soup thick

fog.

So the power plant is Baudoin Marine.  Passenger capacity is 150.  The captain requires a 100-ton license.   Here’s the NYTimes story.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s headed for the confluence of the Saluda, Congaree, and Broad soon.

 

Norwegian Sea seemed to leave town soon after it received its transformative K-Sea to Kirby paint job here about five years ago.  I can’t say for certain that she’s been back in between, but I spotted her immediately from several miles off, given her distinctive upper house support.  Note the Ikea barge there beyond her stern.

Here was a post I just happened to do earlier this month, as a glance back, that alludes to her lines.

She was hooked up to DBL 81   .  . .

Good to see you, Norwegian Sea.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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