Previous installments can be found here.

Thomas and Ellen,

Thomas and Meagan Ann,

Meagan Ann and DS 71

Meagan Ann solo

Emily Ann and SMM 157, and

Brian Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Recently I posted photos from my first time seeing Cape Henry relatively closeup.

I knew it was one of an order of several, so imagine how happy I was to learn that Kyle Stubbs had gotten photos of possibly two others last summer down south.

First, it’s Cape Lookout, near the shipyard and ready for delivery.  As of this morning, I find Cape Lookout rounding the Mississippi delta.

At the same time Kyle got that snap, Cape Henry was yet to launch.

Was Cape Ann already launched by late last summer?  If so, what hull is this?

Many thanks to Kyle for use of these photos.

Previous photos by Kyle can be found here.

 

Today I pass a personal milestone . . . er, year stone, so the editors in Tugster Tower allow me to veer off topic . . .  first, to muse about the effect of picking up a camera and navigating life with it.  While I mostly photograph “sixth boro … and beyond” things that float, getting to and returning from the waters, sometimes I see other surfaces that beckon.  I love murals, especially.  That’s what these are.

First, I’d like to commend Monir’s Deli for a really smart mural.  I’ve never a sandwich from Monir, but the references in this strange assemblage of images compel me one of these days to stop by.  The mural also shows up in this profile of my neighborhood.   Yes, this is NYC . . .

Ditto.  Monir is in Queens, and Sofia’s on Staten Island.  I wonder who painted this first woman in a cocktail glass.  And where, when?  As with Monir’s place, I should stop by Sofia’s one of these days.

This mural was in Harrisburg PA.  I’m not sure what the reference is, but it was s a warm image on a cold day.

The rest here come from Bushwick Brooklyn.  The area at the head of Newtown Creek is certainly worth a visit.  Tagster 5 was based on a walk around there.

I find the one below disturbing.

Here below, I love the incongruity of ballet and boxing.  This outfit suggests some choreography needs doing . . . or improvising.

This is two murals:  one on the side of a truck and another behind it, painted onto the side of a building, with a sidewalk in between.

Here’s the same location shot 20′ to the left.

The chainlink fence adds a layer here.

And finally, the figure in the pigtails appears to be admiring–like me– the colorful foliage painted onto the building at the corner of Jefferson and St. Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, taken while on the journey.

Here’s another focus for murals in the county where I grew up.

 

Maybe I haven’t been paying attention, but it seems Amy C McAllister‘s  been out of the sixth boro a while.  May it reflects that I have…

A bit later Evening Tide passed, crossing the imaginary line between the ice-encrusted 9 and the WTC1.

Amy C left eastbound again . . .

Eventually Evening Tide did also, but I wasn’t there for the photo.

And finally, I’ve always thought the wheelhouse (s) lines on Lucy and Tide look a lot alike, although they were initially built three years apart, one in NY and the other in LA…

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you’re new to the blog, I’ve done lots of blog posts on a NYS Canals tug called Urger.

For the past 5+ years, I’ve freelanced for a great publication called ProfessionalMariner, and this month have my first cover story.  I didn’t know my photo was on the cover until it came out!!  You can read my Urger article here.

Another piece of Urger news I have not reported elsewhere is below.  At the 2018 Waterford Tugboat Roundup, the 1901 built tug was voted “People’s Choice Favorite Tugboat,” winner of a dark horse write in campaign!  Below is the trophy.  Too bad the trophy has no boat to display it in for the public to see.

Now for big news on the political though primarily ceremonial end of things, Assembly member John McDonald III, District 108, has sponsored a bill to designate Urger as “official tugboat of the State of New York.  Read it here.

You can leave a note of thanks and support for Assembly member McDonald here.  If you vote in NYS and want to leave a note for your own rep to encourage him or her to join with McDonald in supporting this bill, you can start the connection here.

You can also write the Preservation League of New York and encourage them to continue their efforts to save this boat as a moving, floating ambassador from our state’s history.  Click here for more on their efforts.

And here’s yet another idea . . .   a 1/12 expired Urger fundraiser calendar. 

And finally, consider attending the Canal Society of New York Winter Symposium in Rochester NY on March 2.  I’ll be there.   Urger will surely come up.

And SCOW (State Council on Waterways) . . .  too bad you’ve dissolved!  There’s a reference of their Urger role at the end of this post. 

Clio came into the sixth boro carrying “mineral fuel” cargo and a thick coating of sea ice.  I’m not sure where she arrived from, but six months ago, she was in some unambiguously hot places, sans ice.

JRT had a band of icelets,

Choptank carried souvenirs of her time upriver where more fresh water flowed,

but Margaret takes the prize with the jagged hang-downs.

C. F. Campbell had ice stalactites yet not nearly enough given her port of registry.  She has been in the sixth boro for a bit over a half year now.

Cold winters . . . they’re good for a lot of reasons . . .even for plants.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Less than five minutes after disconnecting from Seapacis,

JRT has attached to Alpine Maya and guides her into the dock so recently vacated by Seapacis.

 

Jonathan C hangs onto the stern.

James D stays alongside the tanker, since it’s headed for the Stapleton anchorage.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A hex sign?  Well that “boss” is just about a variation on those folk magic symbols so common in parts of PA.

But it’s a logo here, or a symbol I can’t interpret on a crude (?) tanker rotating away from the dock and turning in the length of the KVK . . . one of my favorite maneuvers to watch in the sixth boro.  Previous examples can be seen here.

The evolution started with James D, likely delivering the pilot to the catwalk, as no gangway was deployed.

Then JRT took station near midships.

James D took a line frowner the bow.

See the pilot on the starboard bridge wing?

 

Smoke is in the distance, about a quarter mile on shore.

 

Note the ice buildup on the part of the hull that had been in the shade.

 

When the rotation had reached nearly 180 degrees, JRT broke off in a hurry and  . . .

… well, that’s a post for another day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Last winter I planned a trip along the southern shore of Lake Erie, hoping to catch photos of lakers in ice.  The results were here, a week after ice out, a schedule that depended on someone else’s time off.  It was a fun trip, but the photos I hoped for eluded me.  Well, Brian caught them in the photos below.  GL New York (1913) and Rhode Island (1930) are frozen in, and Oberstar is so deep in hibernation that her shutters are pulled down.

 

Between the stern of Oberstar and the bow of Presque Ile in the distance, that’s Dorothy Ann, half the ATB with . . .

barge Pathfinder, launched in 1953 as the ore boat J. L. Mauthe.  The stern of the newly-renamed barge Maumee clearly shows the deep notch.  Maumee also started life as a 1953-launched ore boat.

er

Tug Victory, which worked in salt water for her first 25 years,  is laid up here between her barge Maumee, until recently called James L. Kuber, and J. S. St John.

Many thanks to Brian for letting me share these photos on tugster.

 

 

I started the week catching a glimpse of the Cape-class tug heading out, among the newest boats in the harbor.  Then I headed out for a few days.

And today, juxtaposed with Frances, here she is.

I was out waiting to interview some other prognosticator animals–given my skepticism about Chuck, PhilDave, and who knows who-else–and sure enough Cape Henry emerged and predicted spring would come on March 20, as the calendar said.  As to spring weather, well . . . we’ll see that by wednesday this week.

For now, enjoy the shape, especially since

Cape Henry headed east and ten

after a short time returned, maybe bound for the Kirby yard.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose been told there are two copies of Cape Henry–Cape Ann and Cape Lookout.

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