At this point in my life, I have a solid list of projects yet to undertake.  One of those is scratch-building a ship or boat model.  Nothing screams “build me” more than this classic laker style.  Enjoy a lot of photos here, curvaceous details to render in a model.

Like the dead ship Paul H. Townsend to the far left, Michipicoten was built in salt water, i.e., Sparrows Point, MD.

 

If you’re wondering how to pronounce Michipicoten, it’s five syllables with emphasis on PI.

That spar mounted on the bow of “house-forward” lakers is called a steering pole, a guide for the helmsman.

Note the crewman watching the camera from the port light above the “M”?

Half the Lower Lakes Towing fleet has the traditional “house-forward” design:  Cuyahoga, Mississagi, Saginaw, Ojibway, and Manitoba.

Note the many large windows on the lee side of the forward superstructure.

The base machinery of the self-unloaders intrigues me.

 

Note the rounded stern and exposed top of the rudder.

The curves on these boats never quit.

 

Into Welland lock 8 she goes.

Yup . . . this winter I need to play around with scratch-building a model, and I’ll see if I can make it eight feet long.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the NYS Canal Conference happening on Staten Island next week.  I will show Graves of Arthur Kill and speak on a panel about the hidden places of the sixth boro.

Let’s call this Fednav’s B-class . . .

Federal Biscay is one of six in that class, all built in 2015 by Oshima.

 

She’s upbound to load, possibly grain for export.  To get a sense of her recent itineraries, click here and scroll.

As a non-US/Canadian vessel, she needs to carry a pilot the whole distance within the Seaway . . . I mean from eastern edge of Quebecois water to whatever her destination and the return.

 

On Lake Erie, she crossed Federal Bering,

a similar bulker.  To see her recent port stops, click here.

 

Bering is down bound, and

 

has to wait for traffic to clear through lock W8 before proceeding.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the NYS Canal Conference happening on Staten Island next week.  I will show Graves of Arthur Kill and speak on a panel about the hidden places of the sixth boro.

 

Port Colborne is the location of MRC, the clean-up business, and right now they’ve a few years–my guess–of projects.

JW Cooper goes in and out several times a day.

But what I wanted to watch was the traffic, up and down bound, like Algoma Buffalo.  The previous two times —here and here–I’d seen this vessel predated her sale to Algoma.

Port Colborne is very quiet on a rainy early fall Sunday,

so quiet I could hear the engine room crew commenting about the town’s stillness,

although I’m guessing they spoke louder than otherwise because they had on ear protection.

Algoma Buffalo headed to a turn-off on the Welland and self-unloaded some of her cargo.  The 24,300-ton-capacity vessel started her cargo-carrying life late in 1978, i.e., just over 40 years ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Besides the title, you might place this photo by the background.  It was the focus of this post from about six weeks ago.

I returned to Port Colborne because I wanted to spend more time.  All vessels traveling between the upper four Lakes and Ontario/St Lawrence Seaway must traverse here.  And an alarm on Bridge No. 21 notifies that traffic will pass in a few minutes from the sound.

In the case of today’s post, however, I was caught between a need to head back across the border and a compulsion to see the vessel about to enter town from Lake Erie.

A schooner.

Leftmost flag on the crosstrees tells the tale.

It’s Lettie G. Howard, homeward bound and beyond.  For now, after a summer of sailing and sail training on Lake Erie, Lettie was headed to New York via the Saint Lawrence/Nova Scotia.

 

As she came into the dock, cold rain starting to fall and hint of winter, the crew tied her up with skill and aplomb to wait for timing.

Fair winds and warm days.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m told Moss Island has some of the oldest rocks in the world, but no one needs to tell me about the potential faces in the rocks, likely the spirits recognized by folks who lived here a half millennium or more ago.  Those spirits are likely still here, recognized or not.

But what alarmed the geese the other day was not the ancients, but rather . . . blue metal.

 

guided by a skilled crew through this dramatic section of the Mohawk gorge.

 

If not for lock E17, this tow would soon tumble over a precipice, a niagara of the Mohawk.

 

Early 20th-century technology, still efficient as ever, drops vessels over 40 feet here,

and when the guillotine door opens,

they can head downriver  . . . eventually to the sea.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

x

Still between Newburgh and Beacon, I see the shadows lengthening and light adding rich tints of every color.  Can you already identify the tug-barge unit rounding the corner tower of Bannerman’s Castle seawall. I’ve heard a story of a long-distance canoeist who slept inside that low tower, but I digress.

Here’s a clue to the name of that tug: a few years ago, it had a different name.   From the north and bathed in deep color, it’s a southbound ship. That generating station is at the intriguingly named Danskammer Point. Those Dutch really had such wild imaginations they seemed driven by superstition or at least an acquaintance with the supernatural.

Also southbound with a spotlight that caught my imagination . . .

it’s Evelyn Cutler meeting

Kristin Poling, 

but the Da Ming Shan will proceed as Evelyn holds back.

 

 

The color may not be in the leaves yet, but at this hour the color is on them.

 

 

The tug-barge units pass after

the asphalt tanker has gone on ahead into the Highlands.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has again missed all the wonderful activities raising funds for restoration or stabilization of the Bannerman’s ruins.

 

It’s late afternoon when Bruce A McAllister with Double Skin 40 passes my spot, followed

by Marjorie B McAllister, with B. No. 262 behind.

From the south with a motley set of barges . . . .

 

 

it’s Frances. Afternoon light is starting to highlight Mr. Bannerman’s place.

 

That IS a short wire, a necessity given that Marjorie has no upper wheelhouse.

 

 

These low hanging clouds have never left today.

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wants to remind you of the Canal Conference in Staten Island coming up in two weeks.

The day brightens a bit, but I stayed between Newburgh–to my back–and Beacon.

Whenever a boat passed, the gulls followed, feasting on the small fish stunned by the props.

The town below gets its name from the mountain, Mount Beacon.

Local squalls obscured the area north of Newburgh-Beacon.

Following Sarah Ann northbound was the indefatigable Buchanan 12.

 

A few miles upriver Buchanan 12 swapped these scows out for a loaded set, and in a few hours, returned southbound.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On this day, the area where the Hudson enters the highlands looked every bit the fjord that it technically is. 

I took these photos and was remembering ones sent by Richard Hudson of southern Chile, here.

It’s Breakneck Ridge on the left and Storm King Mountain on the right, with West Point academy buildings in between. Check out those links for all the other names these places have had in the past 400 years.   And who knows what names have existed before then.

By now some of you have identified the two tugs . . .

Brooklyn and Evening Mist.

I was surprised to learn that Poling-Cutler Marine Transportation now operates Brooklyn.

 

Here Evening Mist moves her barge into the terminal in Newburgh.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ll get back to my homeward bound series tomorrow, but this photo Ashley Hutto sent along Wednesday just astounds me.  It would be a perfect base for a horror movie poster.

Thanks much, Ashley.  That’s a moody photo!

You can find many previous posts featuring Ashley’s photos here.

 

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