. . . signing onto the 6200-teu Maersk Detroit and stepping off at the end of a hitch, this post is inspired by a sixth boro mariner on a milk run.  Many thanks to Mike Weiss** for most of the photos.  It took him 77 days to get from Port Elizabeth back to Port Elizabeth.  Day 1 was back in early November. 

Yesterday I caught a few photos in the KVK of the vessel on the last few miles of a voyage mostly halfway around the world and back.

Mike, an AB, texted me their ETA into the KVK and  

in cold overcast morning I wore my conspicuous vest and waited

to see people on the aft mooring deck.

Welcome home, Mike. This is a timeless way to go so sea:  depart from your home and return to it. 

The following are some photos Mike took along the way, as in the Strait of Gibraltar just before calling at the port of Algeciras

Port Said at the aft mooring deck thousands of sea miles ago, 

entering the Suez Canal and heading under the Al-Salam Bridge (I think), and 

about to exit the Suez following . . . Ever Given [yes, really!!], 

getting an assist at Port Qasim

port of Salalah

and then homeward across the Atlantic to 

port of Houston

and port of Charleston, with many other sights that only Mike can tell about along the way. 

Many thanks to Mike Weiss for sharing these photos and his experiences.  If you didn’t click on the ** link in the first paragraph, you’ll be happy to do it here for some of Mike’s sea resume. 

Maersk Detroit is part of the US-flagged Maersk fleet. 

Ever Given has a big sister now here

 

 

Eastern Welder and 

Dutch Girl have been coming into the sixth boro to rake clams for as long as I’ve been keeping a record, which goes back only to winter 2007.

It’s probably high time I get more info from the commercial fishermen themselves, but as speaking only as a photographer here, I associate winter and these boats in the boro just as I associate summer and recreational boats. 

Enjoy these photos, and as a believer in group sourcing, maybe I’ll be again blessed to have someone who knows this world of winter fishing

share some insights and information.  As with anything, there are stories to hear, just as in the harbor

there are clams to dig and surface.

Meanwhile, stay safe out there. 

Here’s the history perspective. 

Here’s the NJ state perspective. 

All photos, this week, WVD. 

 

All these photos were taken in the second half of January 2013.  This 1973 livestock carrier Falconia was in the Brooklyn Navy Yard getting some work done.  I’d love to see a cargo layout for the vessel.  Also, just back from the foremast, those are large bales of either hay or straw for the livestock.   What would you guess her disposition in second half of January 2023?  Answer follows at the end of this post.

The tanker here is today in the Gulf of Guinea on a run between Gabon and Netherlands.  Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015. 

The green tug Mary Gellatly was transformed into the very busy CMT Mackenzie Rose. 

The behemoth Rebel has become Ken Vinik, awaiting a makeover in the Arthur Kill. 

The name of the hull–we’d spell it “Sovkomflot“–is one you will not see in the sixth boro these days, and it seems the icebreaking tanker is currently

anchored  where it has been for at least the past six months in Murmansk. 

The Penn Maritime Coho has become the Kirby Coho, currently in Savannah. 

Note the ice and snow on the boats above and below;  January a decade ago was frosty!  Barbara McAllister has become Patsy K, which I’ve never seen.  She’s in Panama City FL right now. 

It’s clamming time in the boro, and many of these clam/fish boats come out of this creek in NJ.  More Dutch Girl tomorrow. 

Grey Shark may be a dead ship or even a scrapped one by now, last recorded in the DR. 

And finally, Megan McAllister is alive and well, busy as Charles James.  

All photos from January 2013, WVD.  

And the answer to the question about the current disposition of Falconia:   she’s renamed Dragon and in Midia, Romania on the Black Sea, flying the Togolese flag, and still working, having just arrived in from Libya. For a tour of a much newer and sophisticated purpose-built livestock carrier, click here. More on this category of vessel here, and Dragon specifically on page 49.

For a disturbing report–if you choose to followup here–google Queen Hind livestock carrier, which capsized in Midia in 2019  and resulted in the “lost cargo,” i.e., death 14,000 sheep. 

 

 

 

Even on overcast days, the sixth boro aka NY harbor offers sights.  It’s long been so;  here’s much abridged paragraphs 3-5 Chapter 1 of Moby Dick:

[People] stand … fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning … some seated … some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China… [some] pacing straight for the water…  Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land… They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand…  infallibly [move] to water…  Why did the poor poet of Tennessee, upon suddenly receiving two handfuls of silver, deliberate whether to buy him a coat, which he sadly needed, or invest his money in a pedestrian trip to Rockaway Beach? Why is almost every robust healthy [youth] with a robust healthy soul… at some time or other crazy to go to sea? Why upon your first voyage as a passenger, did you yourself feel such a mystical vibration, when first told that you and your ship were now out of sight of land? Why did the old Persians hold the sea holy? Why did the Greeks give it a separate deity, brother of Jove? Surely all this is not without meaning…. we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans … the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.”

OK, so that might be over the top, but I find at least as much entertainment along the water as in all the other places in NYC.  Maybe that makes me a hermit, but that’s irrelevant.  Can you name these boats?  

At less than 10 miles an hour, trade comes in, commerce of all sort goes on. 

different hour different goods, 

different tasks, 

different energies

and errands 

by different 

companies . .  .

All photos, WVD.

And in order, Jonathan C Moran, Meaghan Marie, Ellen McAllister, Andrea, Schuylkill, Rowan R McAllister, Thomas D Witte, Susan Miller.

 

Grouper . . . that’s likely a quite familiar name to anyone who’s followed this blog a while, given all the posts dedicated to this 1912 vessel that’s spent two decades or so not far from where I grew up, 350 miles away from the sixth boro, which she intended to transit but was prevented by shallows from doing that.  Had she transited the harbor and headed south to sea two decades ago, no doubt she’d already have been reefed, as happened with her traveling companions.  Instead she languished in the canal, prompting many folks up there to imagine a future for the Great Lakes vessel with such sweet lines.  But first a bit of her history and all her previous names

I’m told she’s currently really being prepped for the scrappers’ jaws.  Along with imagining lots of different futures, folks have also imagined these jaws were imminent many times before.  Maybe it will happen this time, but first,  let’s imagine a rescuer coming in to save her.  Her appointment with the scrapper gets cancelled, if not permanently, then at least there’s a reprieve. 

The rescuer arrives with tugboat Virginia and a plan:  the 1912 tug will be towed 

out the western route to Buffalo and then deeper water, waters where she worked from back in 1912. 

In this revery, rescue is tentative at first . . .

with misgivings about their prospects,

But little by little, 

the ability to visualize the Great Lakes begins to take hold. 

There is sunshine, and if no parades and marching bands, then at least a few folks with cameras marking her liberation. 

Virginia is unstoppable, clearing one lock after another, rising up toward the level of the Great Lakes. 

She makes Fairport come and go . . . as they head west. 

But as in a twilight zone . . . froth and momentum 

suddenly comes to an end and she grounds,  stuck on a shoal, unable to be pulled any farther.  Now she’s cut off from deeper water to the west just as she’s cut off east.

This all happened a little over a decade ago.  I can just imagine the thrill of victory leading up to this painful moment.

Many thanks to Larry Bolanowski for sending along these photos of what almost succeeded.  Imagine if she’d made it back west . . . .  Imagine that Kahlenberg purring happily . . .

 

Thanks to a friend for passing along these photos, which follow on Other Peoples Photos and Chancellor 2 from several years ago.  File this under . . . not many machines live forever or even for a century.  In the photo below, you almost get the sense that an 85-year-old tugboat is about to get some much needed TLC aka spa treatment, but

as seen from the other side, 

it looks like strike 3 for keeping her intact.  She’s been opened up, prepped as an organ donor, I hope.

Thanks for these photos . . . MK.  This is not the ending I expected after the auction.

Related only in concept, organ donation info can be found here

A one-year-older “shipyard sister” of Chancellor –currently called Patriotic–can be seen here.  Does anyone have recent photos of Patriotic?

 

Truth be told, I should have passed this 100 milestone long ago, but I forestalled a number of times by differentiating within the title:  for example, besides the August 2007 starting point of random ships 1 but also random ships *1 and really random ships 1 posted inAugust 2016 and March 2019.

Forestalled or not, we are here, and I still enjoy doing this.  These photos all date from this month and December . . .   like B. Franklin Reinauer here lightering Atlantic Blue

Atlantic Crown here has a deck barge alongside delivered by Susan Miller, while in the distance you see the Bayonne peninsula and beyond. 

The next two photos show Laura K Moran assisting MSC Greenwich as an outbound Seaspan New York

shares the KVK as it heads for sea. 

If I’ve learned anything from these years of documenting the traffic the watery boro, it’s the value of light to (duh!) photo graphy.  When you have the dawn light illuminating the orange hull of vessels like NCC Tabuk, with red and shadow image of Miriam Moran, and the cold black steel of the barge to the left,  what more need I say about the joy of spending time in the cold morning solitude watching and “recording.”

What’s not to enjoy about shivering while taking photos of a CMA CGM with the name of a huge tropical city.  

Before completing this post, any ideas about the reference in Tabuk or the age and population size of Surabaya?  Answers follow. 

One more dawn photo here . . .  the enigmatic name Eco Revolution on a tanker escorted into the KVK by a 6000 hp Moran tugboat.  

All photos, WVD. 

Tabuk, in Saudi Arabia, and Surabaya, on Indonesia’s Java Island, have both been settlements for over a millennium.

As for Surabaya, some of you might know the lyrics of the Kurt Weill song here by Marianne Faithfull, but I prefer this one from Javanese myth

Twins today, but as with any twins, one will be deemed older. Do you know which?

Genesis Vigilant used to be called Michigan Service.  Launched in 1981, she’s 99′ x 34′ and propelled by 3000 hp.  The barge GM8001 is 348′ x 75′.

Years ago, i errorneously assumed she was an ATB.

This barge is slightly shorter, narrower and about a decade newer. 

GM 6506 is being towed by Genesis Victory

same dimensions as Vigilant and slightly newer, although still from 1981.  Genesis Victory used to be Huron Service. 

All photos, WVD. 

What interested me in this incoming vessel was its fleet:  Spliethoff, and the name–Dijksgracht–makes her a D-type. Her D-type fleetmates can be found here.  As to cargo, I imagined she might be bringing wood pulp.

But when she came into view, another secret was revealed:  she had a deckload of yachts on a voyage that left Turkey just before Christmas and Genoa just before New Years.  It seemed counterintuitive, however, that a yacht carrier was heading north up the North River and Hudson as snow was flying up there.  Boats in cold New York/Jersey are hauled out and shrink-wrapped now.

 

I can’t identify the make of the yachts, but that brand of tank forward is certainly Turkish.

Lines . . . design . . .

these yachts–with their interstellar styling–are not for me, even if I had the budget.

But what astounded me was the speed of the vessel . . .   it was doing 17 knots under the VZ and continued with astonishing speed farther upriver.

Who knows . . . maybe there’s a snow regatta upriver somewhere.

If you’re interested, the “gracht” part of this name means “canal,” and trust me . . . pronouncing the “cht” in the western Netherlands dialect involves some “throat-scraping” you might say.

 

 

As the vessel passed the Javits Center midday today, I was wondering if any of these will be transported back here for the upcoming boat show in two weeks . . .   Too bad there’s not a pier right off Javits.

All photos, WVD.

The Spliethoff Group is comprised of other fleets such as BigLift;  you might recall BigLift Baffin was in town a few months back.  A smaller class of BigLift vessels all have names beginning with Happy, like Happy River, Happy Dynamic–which I caught hauling yachts out of the sixth boro, and a favorite Happy Buccaneer.  Two previous “gracht” vessels on this blog can be seen here. And a previous Dutch general cargo vessel with a deckload of sailing yachts . . .  here

 

 . . .  and more.  But first, a refresher on Y a M 4, which included the photo below.

A year and a half after the photo above, I caught Utopia IV at Chelsea Piers, and just yesterday I read the report on an incident the yacht was involved in down in the Bahamas:  she ran down and sank a small tanker!!

Here’s the gCaptain article.  Utopia IV can be yours give or take about $50 million.

I believe I’ve not posted photos of this yacht with a million headaches, although I saw it a few times at Chelsea Piers a few years back.  Recognize the name?  The owner–who may have legally forfeited it by now–is Guo Wengui, and some of his story is here. In April 2022, it was reported in an unnamed Med port, but these photos I took in December in Bridgeport CT. 

More on Lady May and scandals here

Then there was the Semisub One story from Hawaii . . .  .  Then there’s Luna, just one of a Russian oligarch‘s yacht fleet, which was in the boro about a decade ago.  Le Grand Bleu and Topaz have been here also.

Yachts . .  a million headaches, IMHO, although I hope I’m not sounding like a crank today. 

All photos, WVD. 

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