It’s the sheer diversity of traffic on the sixth boro that keeps me coming back, although diverse does not mean unpredictable.  In summer, mermaids gather, specifically around the very day of the solstice.  In winter, fishing boats come .    In fall, the fishing boats are of a different sort.

Chele-C was fishing on the west side, and

 

Phyllis Ann over on the east

with Dutch Girl and

 

 

this boat I could not identify.

Eastern Welder has been a fixture in winter fishing as far back as I can remember.

 

Osprey are well known for their fishing ability, so I should not

have been surprised to also have seen HSV Osprey out extracting from the depths.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

. .  or I could call this Scale, the next number in line.

Directly below, it’s Commander, the 140′ x 54′  escort tug on its way to Alaska in 2018.  Photo comes from my sister, of ketch Maraki.  She caught the tug off the east end of the Panama Canal.  More on Commander here.

And on the other extreme in size, here’s a cute little tugboat from Jerry Rice, who runs the Pirates on the Pungo races in Pamlico Sound . . .  more specifically in Belhaven, where I was born.  This tug reminds me of the very popular tug here from over 12 years ago.  The info on the “for sale” sign says “Francis Cox, 252-702-0623.”

And finally, from Jed, and taken a year and a half ago, it’s a Damen RSD 2513 tug.  RSD expands to “reversed stern drive.”  Specs are here.

photo date 17 june 2018

It shows some innovative design.

photo date 17 june 2018

Many thanks to Lucy, Jerry, and Jed for these photos.  I’m also happy to share other folks’ photos.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Lest someone think all container ships built these days or calling in the sixth boro are ULCVs, consider YM Evolution.  She was launched less than 10 years ago and has a teu capacity less than 5000.  The company is based in Taiwan.

I’ve seen Ebony Ray before, but this is the first time I post a photo.  She was launched in 2008 and is part of the Ace Tankers fleet. 

Nord Chesapeake (2016) needed to be lightened before she proceeded up river to Coeymans.  Note the USCGC Katherine Walker in the distance?

Cronus Leader is an NYK RORO.  To see the “insides” of a vessel like this, click here. For a NYTimes article on cat/truck/etc. ships, click here. For more on this vessel and other “vehicle carriers”, click here.

Denak Voyager is a regular calling in the sixth boro.  She moves scrap metals primarily from here to Turkey these days.

I would never have expected a juice carrier like Orange Sun to be a regular in world ports, but New York has very few orange groves, and given the thirst folks like me have for the juice, juice carriers bring the supply.

 

 

And finally, New Ability is an example of the crude oil carriers that call here.  Since I took this photo, she has departed the sixth boro for Mexico, likely to load more crude.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

An unusual profile sailed into the Narrows recently, and what I read says she’s powered by Niigata engines.  Anyone know much about these engines?  The company also builds railroad equipment.

I assumed she’d be in under cover of darkness, but towing a 400′ x 100′ deck barge, she made slow time along the south side of Long Island.

I’m not sure I understand the impact of cold on my camera, but I got these photos from more than half a mile off.

After towing barge Tobias in on the wire, she rounded up in Stapleton and made up alongside.  Eventually, she got assistance and brought the barge into the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

 

For more info on Lois M, check here out here and here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Sometimes the sixth boro gets crowded, as you can see from these posts.  This post tries to show that, but keep in mind that foreshortening makes these vessels seem closer than they are–the two ships below are more than a mile apart.  Keep in mind also that a water channel is a dynamic medium, current and wind are in play, and . . . there are no brakes.

 

About a hundred yards are between the docked “orange/green hull” and Cronus Leader.

Also, the KVK has numerous curves;  it seems here that the pale yellow will pass starboard to starboard with Cronus Leader,

 

but because of the winding channel, a few minutes later they’re clearly headed port to port.

The dark hull along the extreme left of the photo–and several shots above– is tied to a dock.  It’s the NYC DEP sludge tanker Hunts Point, now in service for over five years, as profiled in this article.  It’s time I do another post on the sludge tankers.

 

Orange Sun has safely passed Cronus Leader, leaves plenty of space passing Hunts Point,  

and lets Denak Voyager, heading to Port Newark to load scrap metals, ease through the opening along its portside.

 

A total of fifteen minutes has elapsed between the first photo in this post and the one above.  Scale here can be understood by looking at the crewman on watch–all wearing orange– on the nearer orange juice tanker and the farther bulk carrier.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that at least two things are remarkable here, both the efficiency of effort on the part of the vessel crews and the variety of cargo represented.

Before the internet and interactive maps of all sorts, I covered my walls with maps and studied atlases.  I’ve moved along with some technological modifications.  Recently when a friend reported a planned trip to Guinea Conakry, I was looking at various ships in the offing there, and saw this notation below for STI Onyx.   Intriguing.  That was about two weeks ago, and when I checked last night, they were still on board.  Of course with news like this, one should not be surprised.

Decisive was in port briefly on January 2, but I was unable to get photos before she departed.  As I understand it, she is retrieving old cable, rather than laying down new at this point.  I was unaware of an area in the New York Bight referred to as “cable grounds.”  TSS I believe refers to “traffic separation scheme,” not unlike a jersey barrier or a median strip on a highway.

I checked on Decisive a half day later and saw her “destination” marked differently, now, if expanded, to one nautical mile closest point of approach required,” ie, keep your distance.

AIS is an effective tool for a photographer to see if anything interesting might be moving in the area.

Did anyone manage to get shots of Decisive last week?

Here’s an interesting cutaway drawing of a cable layer and info on the SubCom fleet.  The cables they lay, they ARE how the internet travels between continents.

And those armed guards, I don’t think they have anything to do with Internet security.

And to add to the chaotic nature of this post . . . ever see a dazzle painted tugboat?  Check this one out . . . about a five minute clip here.

 

It’s been a while since I used this miscellaneous title; in fact, it appeared not at all in 2019.

Montreal awards the gold-headed cane, and the Welland Canal’s Port Colborne offers a beaver fur top hat, each a recognition of a maritime first at the start of the calendar year, but the sixth boro has no such ritual that I know of.

So here’s mine . . . I was not here for the first few days of 2020, but at daybreak on January 4 I was at the Narrows for daybreak, and this was the first vessel passing under the VZ Bridge that I recorded.  So Bravo to Paula Atwell,

NTC 1503, and crew.  You perform an invaluable role in the city.

Should there be some harbor recognition of the new year?  Besides Montreal and Port Colborne, are there others?

Also, when I had a good look at Barry Silverton the other day, it occurred to me that it used to look different.  As recently as January 2018, it looked different and seemed to have more flash.

Here’s a photo from over two years ago.  See the difference?  When did it change, and how did I miss it . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders now what else I’ve missed.

 

This post is front-loaded with photos, text heavy at the end . . .  .   Have you seen this boat before?

 

 

The name is new, as is the livery.

And in a previous lifetime it was  . .

Patapsco!  Below that’s a photo of Patapsco I took on September 2, 2007!!  After the tugboat race, she went nose-to-nose with Lucy Reinauer.

It’s the first Vane boat I saw in the sixth boro, and it was even the name of a class of 4200 hp boats that followed.  See a few more here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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