The first two photos–showing the newest and fastest (??) ATB to arrive in the sixth boro– were taken by Randall Fahry.

rrt1

Tina Pyne is one immense mover, and Kirby 185-02 is one of two 578′ ocean going tank barges with 185,000-barrel capacity built by Gunderson Marine for Kirby.   See her christening here.

rrt2

Zachery Reinauer is a Hudson River-built tug from 1971 one of the last 10 built at Matton, and she looks as good today as new!

rrt3

This was taken a few seconds later, and this

rrt4

as she stands by, while Haggerty Girls finesses RTC 107 into position.

rrt5

An occasional sixth boro visitor, it’s Rhea I. Bouchard with B. No. 284.

rrt6

 

rrt7

As I began this post with another photographer’s photo, so I’ll end.  Thanks to Gerard Thornton for this rare catch of Ticonderoga assisting Pleon (?) into the Kills, possibly the last float for Pleon.     That’s also Barry Silverton in the distance.

rrt8

 

Thanks to Randall and Gerard for use their photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

rt

I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

rt1

Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

rt2

Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

rt3

Barry Silverton.

rt4

Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth bork has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

rt5

Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

rt6

my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

jcm

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here were the previous posts, the last one being in April.  On June 11, I took the photo below, and since then had not been back until yesterday. Note how far along the Bayonne Bridge was on that date, as well

wt1x

Here’s a closer up of the rigging on June 11.

wt2

Now let’s jump forward to yesterday, August 15.  Note where the crane barge

wt3

Claude G. Forbes started the morning, and

wt99

and check the progressing in rigging, compared with photo #2 above.

wt4

Yard tug Jay Bee V came out to

wt5

reposition the barge.  Note the mizzen on the background.

wt6

Then the crane pivoted around and

wt7

the block was lowered and

wt8

straps added and

wt9

all systems checked and

wt10

then slowly tensioned.  One end of the mast lifted from off the deck

wt11

BUT then it was lowered.  I waited around for an hour more, but then had other places to be.    I’ll have to pick up the Wavertree story another time.

Since I mentioned the Bayonne Bridge–its own process–here’s what the work looks like as of August 15 from over off the west end of Caddell Dry Dock .. . aka ex-Blissenbach Marina now known as Heritage Park, which in my opinion, should have foliage trimmed so as to be  more user friendly for land-based photographers.

wt12

Thanks to everyone who braved the heat last night and came to the showing of Graves of Arthur Kill.  Special thanks to those wizards who problem-solved our way through the technical challenges, except I had brought along an antepenultimate version . . .  and sorry I didn’t have a chance to talk with everyone there.  What you want–prepare for an explicit commercial message here– is this version, which Gary and I call “the director’s cut,” available for a mere $11.99.

While I’m doing “commercials,” here’s an opportunity for the right people to sail offshore on South Street Seaport Museum’s 1893 fishing schooner, up to Gloucester for the 2016 schooner races, or back, or some portion thereof. Click here for some of the many Lettie G. Howard posts I’ve done over the years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

You’d have thought I use this title more often, but it’s been almost three years since it last appeared. I’m starting with this photo of the lightship WLV-612, because this is where I’ll be this evening for a FREE and open-to-the-public 6 pm showing of our documentary Graves of Arthur Kill.  Seats for those who arrive first.

Over the years I’ve done many posts about the WLV-612, but my favorite is this one.

rb1

Here’s a very recent arrival in the sixth boro’s pool of workboats . . . Fort McHenry, just off the ways, although just yesterday an even-more recent arrival.  more on that one soon, I hope.  I don’t know how new Double Skin 315 is.

rb2

Ships in the anchorage and waterways must think they are in a tropical clime, given the temperatures of August 2016.

rb3

NS Parade, Iron Point, MTM St Jean …  have all been here recently.

rb4

Robert E. McAllister returned from a job, possibly having assisted Robert E. Peary.

rb5

MSC Lucy headed out past

rb6

Larry J. Hebert, standing by at a maintenance dredging job.

rb7

MOL Bellwether, all 1105′ loa of her, leave into the humid haze, existing here along with

rb8

some wind to propel this sloop.

rb9

Finally, just the name, sir;  No need for the entire genealogy. This photo comes compliments of Bob Dahringer.

rb99

Thanks to Bob for the photo above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are the previous posts I’ve done on the wind farm southeast of Block Island.  I took the photo below on June 27, as blades to spin the turbines arrived in Narragansett Bay.

bbbt

Rod Smith took the rest of these photos in late July and early August.

bt1

It shows Brave Tern as it prepared to sail out to the farm, deploy its sea legs . .  aka spuds  . .

bt2

and put the caps atop the columns onto the bases.

bt3

 

bt4

For the specs on Brave Tern, you can check them out here,

bt5

or here,

bt6

or

bt7

here.

bt8

 

bt9

And check out the froth from her stern!

bt10

To keep up with construction off Block Island, check out the Deepwater Water site.  Or for even more updates, friend them on FB.

Many thanks to Rod Smith for all these photos except the first one.

I hope to get out that way in October.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  This is the SUNY training ship’s return this past week from a “sea term” that began this way on May 10. This first set of photos comes from Roger Munoz, who took them from high above 74th Street.

sunya

 

sunyaa

That’s Roosevelt Island just to her far side, and the Queens and the Bronx farther beyond.

sunyb

Later that morning, Thomas Steinruck took these during the assist back into the dock

suny1

as

suny2

friends and family welcomed TS Empire State VI home.   Now it’s back to classes, study, and tests in this part of the Bronx.

suny3

 

Many thanks to Roger and Thomas for use of these photos.

Let’s look at these from a different perspective . . . whether they can escape the inland seas shared by the US and Canada or not.  The maximum size the Seaway aka Highway H2O can accommodate is 740′ x 78. x 30.’

So Kaye E. Barker . . . 767′ x 70′ x 36′ . . . Nope.    But when she first came off the ways in Toledo in 1951, her loa was 647′ and she had no self-unloader, so back then she could have,

fs1

although there was no St. Lawrence Seaway then either.  So Nope again. But she was not lengthened until 1976, so Yes.  Her tonnage capacity is 25,900.

fs2

Mississagi comes in at 620′ x 60′ x 35,’  so if she’s carrying a partial load . . . maybe.  She came out of the River Rouge in 1943.  Her capacity . . . 15,800 tons.

fs3

In photo #2 above and the one below, notice the RenCen of Detroit.

fs4

American Mariner came out of Buffalo in 1979 at 730′ x 78′ x 45.’

fs5

So with a light load, yes.

fs6

Her capacity is 37,200 tons.

fs7

I don’t know if she ever leaves the Upper Lakes.

fs8

Chemtrans Elbe is a saltie, so obviously she’s a global traveler.  She was built in Korea in 2009 and measures 423′ x 75.’

fs9

Edzard Schulte was built in China in 2011, 475′ x ’75.’

fs10

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

* here means  . . . in freshwater.  Actually there’ve been 50 posts under this title, but this is different.  And note the color of the water, brown in the case of Isolda below because it’s steaming out of the muddy, clay-suspended Maumee.

gls1

In the blue waters of the St. Clair River with Sarnia on the far side, it’s Lee A. Tregurtha.

gls2

Headed unbound not far from the same location, it’s Victoriaborg.

gls3

Down in an ocean port along the Indiana coast and shot from a speeding Amtrak, it’s James R. Barker.

gls4

Over in East China–East China Michigan, that is–it’s Lubie making her way to the ocean, well over a week away.

gls6

Upbound out of Detroit, it’s Hon James L. Oberstar, 

gls9

a downbound Algonova,

gls10

and to close it out today .  . Philip R. Clarke.

fs12

 

fs11

Clarke (Ohio) was launched 1951; Algonova (Turkey) in 2007; Oberstar (Ohio) , 1958; Lubie (China) 2011; Victoriaborg (Netherlands), 2001; Lee A. Tregutha (Maryland), 1942, as USS Chiwawa–and you need to click here to see her initial configuration!!; and finally Isolda (Japan) in 1999.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Let me clarify the title .  . all these photos were taken in Dutch waters by Aleksandr Mariy.  Jade is actually a German tug built in 2000.

13588717_996840727031658_382035905_o.png

Union Emerald–the tailing portion of this tow–is Belgian, 2005 built.

13621382_996841200364944_234173086_o.png

And in between, the barge is Dutch.

13589054_996841610364903_456582072_o.png

I like the lines of Veritas with a telescoping wheelhouse, but searches turn out empty.  Can anyone help out?

ddt

Friendship is 1942 built.

ddt1

Thamesbank dates from 1992.

ddt2

 

ddt2b

Amber II, previously called “camber,” was built in 2007.

ddt3

Union 7 is a URS boat.  The company has roots going back almost 150 years. 

ddt4

Many thanks to Aleksandr for these photos.

And apropos of nothing, I stumbled upon this boat Uranus while researching this post . . . a tugboat with dimensions of 244′ x 60′ x 8′ draft and with four engines adding up to more than 24,000 horsepower!!  Here she is.

Finally, if you are in the NYC area and have not yet seen Graves of Arthur Kill, join us for the 2 pm showing on Saturday at the St George terminal of the Staten Island ferry.

 

Fly the Whale, that is.  And you can watch it all from the Barge Bar on the East River.

wh1

Click here for a short video showing how to beat traffic . . .

wh2

Of course, seaplanes or flying boats are nothing new to the sixth boro.  Click here for a short video of a Dornier Do-X arriving in a tugboat-filled harbor in 1929.  It has no sound, but if you want to hear the details, here’s another longer video.   Keyport NJ’s Aeromarine was operating long distance flights from the sixth boro even earlier.

wh3

 

wh4

Watch them come and go

wh5

as

wh6

you

wh7

watch from

wh8

here.  For seaplane prices, click here.  But it costs nothing to watch, which is the right price for me.

wh9

Click here for a previous post on Keyport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that the photos in this post from February 2015 is an invigorating reminder of winter on a hot day.

Also, yesterday Marie Lorenz competed her journey in a rowboat from Buffalo to the sixth boro, and in true DeWitt Clinton fashion, she celebrated her accomplishment by pouring out some Lake Erie water into New York harbor.  See it and much more here.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 993 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

August 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 993 other followers