Looking, seeing . . . but not understanding makes me wonder if I’ve missed stuff before.  Am I dense, or is that something I don’t recall noticing before.  See it too?

Here’s the rest of the vessel with the (I believe) unusually high mast.  And as large as this bulk carrier is, she seems disproportionately small

as the ULCV passes behind her.  More on that ULCV in another post.

Below is what I meant by the initial question:  notice the yellow quarantine flag?  Is that common?  Is it required for all vessels needing to clear into the US after they arrive in the  sixth boro?  AIS showed that the Monrovia-flagged Alerce N was arriving here directly from Santiago Cuba, (CU-SCU) and that I believe is unusual.

As I said, I miss stuff because I don’t understand what I’m seeing.  And here’s another puzzling sight below . . .

does that mast seem strangely articulated?

It’s the forward mast on Gustav Maersk.  Is it possible that an extension top section has been added?

And since I’m professing a lot of ignorance today . . .does anyone have the definitive explanation for this hulk off Clason Point in the Bronx neighborhood of Shorehaven ?  Over a decade ago, jeff s commented as follows:  “its CHRISTINA or CRISTINA, a failed project…. to be an eatery in Philadelphia but abandoned.”  I’d still love to hear more.

All photos and questions by Will Van Dorp.

 

Not a frequent visitor to the sixth boro,

it’s Barbara Carol Ann Moran . . .  with barge Louisiana

built in Sturgeon Bay WI and launched a few years ago, heading for GOM via the St Lawrence.

And I see it here on Thanksgiving Day.

 

I hope the galley of BCA Moran smells great with hearty food on this windy day.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who extends special greetings to anybody out anywhere earning a paycheck today.

And if you want to read some corny [not a pun] T’day thoughts, click here.

Seen from this angle, Houston Star, 817′ x 144′,  is a wide-bodied petroleum carrier, recently

assisted in with

 

Kirby Moran on her port side.   I was having difficulty finding more info about the tanker until, using her IMO number,  I stumbled onto her previous name.  Any guesses?

 

This, I gather, is an ice breaking bow.

All photos and investigations by Will Van Dorp, who was surprised to learn that Houston Star was once named for the Egyptian goddess, Isis.

And here’s an interesting cable-laying vessel that came into the sixth boro this morning . . . while I was tied up.  It’s a poor photo of Decisive, but if you out there got some better ones, I’d love to hear from you.

 

Last week featured a few photos of HMS Dragon over by the Manhattan passenger terminal.  Those photos prompted these from a tug captain on the Clyde, who attended the launch of the vessel back just over 11 years ago.

Click here and, with the magic of YouTube,  you see video of the launch AND the tug, with music.

Here mere seconds before the first splash, the tug has moved away .  .

 

Now the tug moves back in to tether the dragon to grab the bridle and

lead it to a dock.

All photos by Capt. Tommy Bryceland, whose photos have previous appeared here.

 

Excuse the branches and tendrils reaching out over this dense pack of tugboats:  five Bouchard boats plus a Harley behind Denise and a Genesis on the drydock.

Crystal Cutler here in profile is heading for the Kills;  this photo prompts me to wonder how this wheelhouse “window” configuration has worked out.

Stephen B assists Fells Point leaving IMTT with Double Skin 302.

Marie J Turecamo heads east on the KVK.

I can’t recall now whether this is my first time to see Vane’s New York, here with Double Skin 53.

Seeley moves a scow eastbound.

Mount St. Elias goes west here.

And finally . . . J. George Betz heads east, possibly to pick up a barge.

All photos and interpretation by Will Van Dorp, who is solely responsible for content . . .

Here are the previous posts in the series.

The bow of the ship, the park, and Newark International tower could establish the location, as could

the stern of the ship and the signage on the bridge lower right.

How many tugboats do you spot?  What do you now about them and the ship from colors and livery?

How near are the tugboats one from the other?

Here’s a digression . . . two models of shipping in 2019.

Here’s exactly the same shot.  Here‘s the info on Arthur Maersk.

Alex here appears to be mirroring the forward motion of Arthur, while simultaneously pulling her to starboard and in the channel.  I’m sure the folks who do this might have other words and other descriptions of what is happening here.

Meanwhile, Ava (rhymes with Java) pushes on the stern, and

compared with photos 3 and 4 above, notice how far apart along the starboard side of Arthur the two tugboats are.  And the fishing boat, just to the left of the red buoy, is several hundred feet off.

Alex continues force along the same vector.

All photos and words by Will Van Dorp, whose admiration for this oft-repeated maneuver around Bergen Point hasn’t diminished.

 

Weeks 533 has credibility: she lifted the USAir Flight 1549 Airbus A320 out of the Hudson back almost 11 years ago and more.  So the other day when I was on my way to “yon” and saw her “hither” and she was working with Susan Miller, I decided to linger and inquire.

That’s when I noticed the pier 11 Wall Street float was partially submerged, and a heavy lift crew was aboard securing cables.

Besides that crew, one tug and Susan Miller, even the Green Lady was craning her neck overtop the ferry and over in my direction, paying attention.

 

When I managed to board a conveyance and get to the middle of the East River . . .

I saw there were actually four tugs involved,  two Dann tugs and another Miller tug.

Once the landing barge was lifted over the spuds and large pumps installed–I think that’s what I saw–Susan Miller whisked the barge away to be repaired, rehabbed.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who calls this another feat for Weeks 533.

Lots more tugster cranes here.

[Specialized] vessels don’t push or tow or transport cargo per se.  They are tools with a variety of applications, as diverse as the tools in a professional mechanic’s chest, in an entire full service garage, in fact.

Ocean Researcher has appeared here before, but not escorted by a tug, as James D. Moran is doing here.  I’m not sure why it was escorted in the other day.

 

She came in after some time crisscrossing the all-but-trackless sea off Atlantic City.

Fugro Enterprise has appeared here before as well.

In this case, she was headed back out to sea,

 

Below is a sample of Fugro Enterprise’ track earlier this week.

And for comparison, Ocean Researcher left the indicated track SE of Atlantic city during the same time period.

Kings Pointer also has appeared here before . . . and she’s a tool with its own purpose . .  training.

Before coming to the USMMA in 2014, this vessel was known as MV Liberty Star, and had a different use . ..  locating and retrieving jettisoned Shuttle external fuel tanks.

Here–above and below– she transits Hell Gate, first westbound and then east.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who never marked Highland Eagle–still in Lake Huron–as a specialized vessel.  Another Great Lakes-dedicated research vessel, with a notable environmental name, was recently put up for sale, as here.  I saw it in Sturgeon Bay over two years ago here.

 

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Click here for a series of posts and photos of Wards Island from a point almost exactly four years ago, in mid November  when I spent a long day photographing the old crane ship on what was to be her last year working.   Today she lies at the bottom of Hempstead Reef, a few nautical miles of the west end of Jones Beach Island, in 50 to 70 feet of water. A map follows below.  I’d love to hear from anyone who has fished or dived on the reef during the past year, since she has graced the bottom with her hospitable presence.

Although I’ve posted some of these photos, the day I spent on her pulling Erie Canal navaids out of Oneida Lake was a magical day .  . mid November, but warm and without wind.  Enjoy this set.

Photos were taken from morning to night on November 16 and then the last one is November 17, 2015.  All are re-edited.

She ran, if not quite like a deer.

Heading eastbound into the Lake had the look of space flight.

 

For a crane ship fashioned from a double-ended ferry, she plucked buoys from the water quite efficiently,

replacing them with ice buoys, of the right color of course.

 

 

 

But for November,

it was an enviable day for photos.

Some of the navaids in the Lake rest on concrete-capped shoals, islands.

At the end of the day, all buoys were transferred to a barge so that Wards Island had cleared decks for the next day of work.

 

Click on the DEC map below to get to an interactive map.

Click on the photo below to see more of the Flickr photo stream from which it was taken.

All photos not otherwise attributed taken in November 2015 by Will Van Dorp, who is eager to see photos of her taken in her watery home.

And as a wise friend, frequent commenter here has said in relation to another vessel, “[New boats] have come along to supplant and surpass their predecessors. We should count ourselves fortunate to have known so many of the elegant and durable old-timers while they were still around, and feel privileged to help transmit their images and stories into the future.”    Thanks, Lee

 

 

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