Urger got some love yesterday, and tugster was there to document it.

Wait . . . is that Urger?

No . . . that’s tug Seneca

and there is the Capt. Wunder getting some visitation in and 

telling stories about the days he was her captain, but

“there’s more,” he said. 

The older step-sister is here too. 

The tugs were a place of pilgrimage.

Recall they are now seldom-seen but certainly not forgotten. 

Want to make a poster?  Write my email and ask for a full-size version of this image.  Once you get it, send it far and wide to enthusiasts who lament her isolation as well as enthusiasts who can take her out of isolation.  

All May 9, 2022 photos taken by WVD with arrangements by the Canal Society of NYS.  Please share this post far and wide to the family of Urger and Seneca fans. 

 

 

We’ve updated our incomplete work from yesterday, and hey . .  it’s May, tugster is away, and that makes it a perfect time for another installment of  . . . truckster!  

For starters, how about a 1950 F-1 on the street in Queens!@#!

Along the road on a recent tugster road gallivant and inside the Outer Banks . . . we spotted this 1952 Ford, made to [attempt to] play in a place like the Dismal Swamp maybe.

Speaking of saltwater, this 1952 (?) GMC has been exposed long enough for a sweet patina.

Having slept in a tent recently near a rooster farm, tugster wonders what sound a rusty rooster makes.

Talking patina, he caught this early 1950s Chevrolet in the low-angle morning light, in Washington . . .  NC that is.

There’s patina, and then there’s post-patina, but the guy selling this told tugster he could throw a battery in this CJ and she’d start right up . . .

How about this one from a Great Lakes mariner, spotted not far from Lake Superior?  I’d say a camo Dodge M37?  Under all that snow, there might be a little patina as well.

On another Queens street, tugster saw this and wondered if patina can be translated into Italian . . .  actually patina is the same in English and Italian and you won’t find any here.

And to round this post out, tugster was returning from a Shawngunk hike the other day and saw this beauty, a 1950-something Studebaker, a real beaut.

 

Love the milk can and produce crates in the back?

Thanks to a Great Lakes mariner for sending along that snowy pic;  all the others, WVD, as he prowled the backroads and who thinks that not much says gallivant more clearly than old trucks . . . .  Complete text here by the renegade robots, who want to stress that they met their deadline today.

x

Clearly, we robots messed up.  To make amends, here’s some info pasted in:

GENERAL RUDDER (IMO: 8835463) is a Training Ship that was built in 1984 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 4.5 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 68.28 meters and her width is 13.11 meters.
Here’s more on Texas A & M’s training ship. 

BERTO L MILLER (IMO: 8964850) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 1999 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3.1 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 49.71 meters and her width is 13.41 meters.
Here’s more the the Miller’s Launch OSV fleet. 

GO AMERICA (IMO: 8968181) is a Offshore Supply Ship that was built in 2001 and is sailing under the flag of USA.
Her current draught is reported to be 3 meters. Her length overall (LOA) is 44.35 meters and her width is 10.97 meters.

Here’s more on the Guice Offshore (GO) fleet. 

 

Many thanks for all photos to Pete Ludlow.  Tugster might pull our plugs and drain our batteries for our failing to fill in the info yesterday.

xx

 

Adeline Marie was at anchor off the Coney Island Light.

Douglas J and a dump scow were shuttling to and from HARS.

 

Mary Emma was arriving from sea.

 

Joyce Brown passed a big unstuck green ship,

 

Stuff is always happening, and all photos, WVD.

More photos here thanks to Pete Ludlow.

The Amigo is an asphalt tanker.  That means she moves her cargo around at almost 300 degrees F.

 

She was eastbound with assist by James D Moran.

 

What do you suppose Vinik No. 6 had in tow?

 

Nicholas and Liz assisted as well.

But of course, it was the venerable training ship . . .

from the shipyard on its way back to Fort Schuyler.

Again, many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Unrelated:  Since we robots monitor harbor events and share news, here’s a surprise that will astonish tugster upon his return:  The Brown tugs have been sold to Seward Marine of Chesapeake VA.

 

Try this: a cruise from Buenos Aires to . . . Milwaukee!! These folks are currently doing it.

Below is my screen capture as they were leaving the sixth boro.   Here‘s my blog post of them along the west side of Manhattan.

Post by the robots as WVD is away.

Thanks for these shots to Pete Ludlow.  You could call some of this post “Yachts a Million 5 Redux.”

Gene Chaser appeared on this blog back last fall, but from different angles.  As of this late April writing, she’s in Miami. Some great photos of her and the yacht she supports can be seen here.

I strike out here.  I don’t know the Rambler story, but clearly she’s out and rambling, unlike Sea Monster, at least last I heard.  Remember Santandrea?

Jaguar has come into the sixth boro several times towing in schooners for conversion into eating establishments

Magnet, Metal Shark’s expedition catamaran, was in the boro last fall.

Arriva has carried several names since launch in 2001.

As Vajoliroja, she had a quite flashy celebrity owner. She’s Turkish built.

Again, many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Beyond Celebrity Apex, look!  It’s a container ship

from 1988

escorted into port by 2016 Trident.

The 2016 Trident, 99′ x 44′ and 5730 hp, has an unusual configuration below the hull:   she’s a Robert Allan Ltd-designed advanced rotortug (ART), meaning three engines and three Schottel z-drives, creating triangular propulsion to enhance maneuverability. See more on that here.

National Glory is a 575-teu box ship.  That’s NOT 15000.

In comes another, Galani, 1732 teu.  Assist is provided by a 1995 Broward, 5100 hp, 96′ x 40, a relatively conventional z-drive boat. 

The other assist is from the 1998 St. Johns, 88′ x 50′ 4000 hp and nothing conventional below the waterline.  She is referred to as a “ship-docking module,” aka SDM design.  See a schematic and read all about it here.

All photos by C. Baker, my sister, to whom I am grateful.

Tugster is on an extended trip, so the robots have scheduled these posts.  Later in May, I will get back to Barge Canal-era photos from the Canal Society.  I’ve taken a break from that series to “catch up.” 

Next I’ll alternate in posts using photos thanks to Pete Ludlow, whose aerie high above the East River just “west” of Hell Gate places him in a unique location to get good photos of traffic through there, and he has certainly captured some winners, photos and evolutions I’ve not seen from my preferred places.

Here Jay Michael tows a dead ship Sea Hunter to be scrapped farther downeast.

 

Some years ago I caught Sea Hunter in port of Boston, when she looked bad but surely not this bad. 

Sea Hunter was once the platform for a treasure hunter, but as so often happens, certain treasure becomes just out of reach, if they ever existed at all. 

Another unusual tow, this one westbound, is Ivory Coast towing

GDM 264, a barge-mounted cement unloader.

 

Many thanks to Pete for sharing these scenes not previously seen on tugster.

Let’s jump back to May 2012.  Over along the Manhattan side of the East River then, I caught this scene.  Since then, there’s been some movement:   Peking to Germany,  Marion M to the Chesapeake,  Helen McAllister to  . . . rebirth as new steel.

Cheyenne has migrated to the Lake Michigan for now.

Twin Tube is still around but sans the boom.

Ellen McAllister is also still hard at work in the sixth boro, but I don’t see her doing much indirect towing as here.

Mark Moran was just passing through from the shipyard to Charleston.

Swan, built in 1981 and showing as her last movement three and a half years ago in China, has likely gone to rebirth as new steel.

But a decade ago in May 2012, she was here to move some used tugboats over to West Africa. Here she’s already down and BFT No. 38 with a crew boat strapped on has already been loaded, while

McAllister Sisters and McAllister Girls wait with three Crowley tugs, 

Cavalier, Pioneer, and Mars

After they are floated aboard, the tide turns the anchored Swan.

Socrates and Heron also float aboard, and

overnight, Swan gets deballasted and raises the hull, so that we can see their five-bladed wheels.   More of the story here.

Also in the boro those days was Picton Castle, showing the flag and more, maybe recruiting some hands

before sailing away.  Does anyone have news about her?  Has she really stayed in Lunenburg since late 2020?

All photos, WVD, exactly 120 months ago.

Unrelated to any of this, read this May 2004 article by the late great Don Sutherland and reflect on how much change has occurred.

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