Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

This photo is out out order in this sequence, just to show scale.

Before a tanker leaves, the boom gets removed by these small boats, which

also help handle the lines.

Miriam came in to deliver the pilot(s).  She then gets a line toward the stern to pull the tanker off the dock.

Marie J. gets a line on the bow to pull it away from the dock for the turning.

The top photo would come here; once the bow has moved off the dock sufficiently for Marie J to get behind the bulb, she does so . .  and pushes the bow around while Miriam holds the stern.

 

 

She’s now more than 90 degrees off the starting point, and turning into a flood tide, if I remember correctly.

 

Once the tanker’s turned 180 and pointed into her desired course, Marie J. speeds ahead to get onto the port side of the tanker.

All photos, WVD.

Kudos to Allen Baker for catching this boat coming through, and as of Friday morning she’s still in the boro even though she’s headed for Norfolk, I believe.

Have a look at her and see if you can tell any differences between this new boat and a long evolutionary string of Moran boats depicted here and culminating in the 6000s like Kirby Moran….

And the difference is . . .  she’s all different:  shorter (by almost 10′), cleaner (Tier IV), and with an all-different propulsion (Cat/Royce turning 94″ wheels v. EMD/Schottel turning 102″).  It would be interesting to see them side by side as well as from the interior.  There are other differences as well.

Again, kudos to Allen for catching this boat coming through on delivery south. 

Coincidentally, just last week I reread Tugboat: The Moran Story by Eugene F. Moran and Louis Reid, published in 1956.  That book covers 1850 to 1950, and I’d love to see installment two of the Moran story, covering the 65 years since Tugboat came out.  Is anyone writing it?  I’d step up . . . for what that’s worth.

A starting point is here, and in the Towline archives you find there.

Six years ago today, truckster was spawned here.  I’ve had fun with that, and if I see more old mobile or formerly mobile hardware along the ways, I’ll still stop and look closer.  By the way, any guesses on the make and year?  Answer is at the end of this post.

But all things must change . . .  especially when a for-the-birds idea turns into a dux nightmare, and gigantic ones start poking out of the fog.  Maybe this blog could focus on poultry a la duxster?

Do I want to go on with this, or should I let

sleeping muscovites just sleep . . . and sleep elsewhere?

Or a formal dress blog called tuxster?  With all the memes post-Ever Given, how about a blockage blog called stuckster?

Nah . .  . I’ll stick to tugster.  Count the tugs here?  Maybe we’ll reprise this busy photo

in tomorrow’s post.  For now . . .  that old truck is NOT a voltswagen . . . .

It’s a derelict 1938 Ford.

All photos . .  and lame humor, WVD.

See you at the parade today!

Janice Ann Reinauer came on line at some point in the past few months, but this is my first viewing light.

She’s bigger and more powerful than the previous boat by that name:  113′ x 35′ v. 82′ x 24′ and 4720 hp v. 2200.

She might be a carbon copy of the 2013 Dean Reinauer, in the distance, although I’m sure upgrades have been built in.

Cape Fear came into service right about the same time as Janice Ann.

She’s one of two of the latest 3000 hp in the Vane fleet;  her twin in Cape May, which I’ve not seen.

Here Cape Fear goes into the notch, alongside Potomac to her starboard side . . . as Jacksonville passes.  Potomac and Jacksonville are 4200 hp boats.

 

All photos, WVD.

The erudite readers of tugster know Evergreen doesn’t have a single vessel, the one that caused some anxiety in Suez recently.  In fact, the fleet comprises about 200 ships, of different sizes or classes.  The L and F classes currently call in the sixth boro.  The teu capacity for the F class is just over 12000.  In other words, the vessel that departed the sixth boro this morning holds 8000 fewer containers than Ever Given, coming in over 20000 teu.    Another way of visualizing it is this:  add all the containers of this F class boat AND all from an L class vessel . . . and you’ll have one Ever G class.  And consider this, an Evergreen A class is on the drawing board . . .  coming in between 22k and 23k containers!

Enough alphabetizing . . . Ever Faith is currently on its way to Baltimore.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD, who had a hard time coming indoors today to download these photos and post.

The Soo is open, the SL Seaway is open, and now after 6 days, 3 hours, and 38 minutes of blockage . . . the Suez is open.

I’d started this post before Ever Given was freed and intend it as a survey of some of the tugs involved, here from largest to smaller. Obviously dimensions do not tell the whole story;  in fact, dimensions tell only the story of length and width, but most of these are not harbor tugs.  The largest is Alp Guard, 243′ x 69′ and generating just over 24000 hp.

Next are two quite similar Suez Canal Authority tugs, Ezzat Adel (226′ x 52′)

and Baraka 1, same dimensions, built in 1993 one year before Ezzat Adel.

Carlo Magno comes in at 180′ x 49′, still larger than anything in the sixth boro.

Now we’re at the scale of sixth boro tugs, although several in the boro are larger.  Basel 2 measures in at 119′ x 38′.

Salam 8 and 9 were there, coming in at 115′ x 36′

Svitzer Port Said 1 and 2 measure 104′ x 43′ and generate 6772, very similar to the largest sixth boro assist tugs.  For example Capt. Brian and Ava M. generate 6770 hp.

Mosaed 3 comes in at 98′ x 36′.

Of course, tugs weren’t the only factor.  Someone like Resolve or Smit Salvage taking charge is needed to orchestrate the efforts, which include dredging as well. If you’ve not seen this interview with salvage master Nick Sloane, it’s an enlightening listen.

Credit for photos is embedded in the photos;  click on each to see it.

Any errors, WVD.

Was this an event just waiting to happen?  See here.

 

March 25, 2011 was a busy day.  L to r, Maurania III, USNS Yano, Resolute, McAllister Responder, McAllister Girls, Amy Moran . . . with a K-Sea barge at the mooring, and some iconic structures.  None of these vessels in currently in the sixth boro.  Amy Moran is now John Joseph.

Let’s follow the USNS vessel first, as it’s assisted into the graving dock.  Yano is in Newport News at this time, 2021. 

Yano is an example of a US-flagged non-Jones Act vessel.

A bit later, more to the west, Davis Sea stands by to assist Taurus

and DBL 25 into a dock.  Taurus recently came to the boro from Philly as Joker.  Davis Sea is now Defender. 

The following day, Maurania III and

McAllister Girls sail British Serenity off the dock. Maurania III is now in Wilmington, and British Serenity is now Champion Timur and is in the Black Sea on a voyage that began in Indonesia.  Girls is laid up.

An hour later, Jennifer Turecamo assisted the big OSG 350 moved by

OSG Vision westbound.  Jennifer is in Tampa, and Vision runs in and out of Delaware Bay.

All photos and any errors, WVD, who notices the old Bayonne Bridge profile above.

For an update on Ever Given, click here.

And the answer to yesterday’s what and where Jay Michael off Bridgeport, CT….

Let’s try this:  which boat and where.  Some of you will quickly identify the tugboat and a bit later say the location.  Some of you might guess the company by the color of the tug.  Others of you will have no association at all.

I took these photos Tuesday of this week.

 

The boat has appeared several times on this blog and calls irregularly in the sixth boro.

 

Here’s the best clue.

 

Answer tomorrow.  All photos, WVD.

I had something different planned for today, but one does not plan the news.  Since I’m map-oriented, I’m sharing what I found on the “maps” of the Ever Given story, the 20,000 teu+ container ship acting as a cork in a bottleneck.

Below is the context for the story.  If you’re not that familiar with the bigger context, grab a map showing the SE corner of the Mediterranean Sea.  On the map below, notice Alexandria, Cairo, and Tel Aviv.  Aqaba is lower right.  Color code is as follows:  red = tankers, green = freighters, aqua = tugboats.  Also note the absence of traffic for a portion of the canal (that line) going southward from Port Said. Normally there’d be red, green, or aqua icons there.

Here’s a closeup of the location where Ever Given has wedged itself across the canal.

Click on the image below to get a recent Reuters story.  Here from space.com is another story with great images.

Note the aqua-colored  tugboats, out of scale, attempting to extricate the cargo vessel.

With a cork in the bottle, so to speak, ain’t nuttin goin’ nowhere, as I might say in a different setting.

The image below shows more context than the image above.  Suppose your rush order too big for air cargo happened to be on one of those ships.  Actually, there’s cargo halted there for hundreds of millions of folks.

The image below shows bottled up southbound traffic (mostly) unable to proceed beyond Ever Given south of Qaryat al Jana’in.

The image below shows the backup so far in the Mediterranean, again mostly southbound traffic, mostly Asia bound.

It ain’t over yet, and it takes a lot more fuel to get between Europe and Asia by sailing around Capetown.

Personal note:  I sailed from Jeddah to Port Suez 35 years ago and saw lots of traffic on the Red Sea in both directions.

Credit to marine traffic.com for allowing these views.

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