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Back in September 2007, I was paying attention to the green Gladding-Hearn 1966 Dragon, when a schooner with tanbark sails entered my field of view, and what

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a schooner she was.  I never got any nearer than to take the photo below. Twice, however, I got requests for copies of that photo.  Fulfilling the more recent request led to an invitation to see the boat, which had undergone a long restoration process, and sans masts was back in the water.

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So here she is, two weeks ago in Friendship Maine.  Drool . . . .

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Click here for some specs.  Her name is Gallant and she’s actually only slightly older than Dragon and built less than 15 miles from GH, as the gull flies.

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I’m eager to see her masts stepped and sails bellied.

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Many thanks to Don Zappone for the tour of this sweet schooner.

Here’s the index.

Since I grew up in western New York and my grandparents lived 30 or so miles off to the right of this photo, crossing this bridge happened several times a year.  It was by far the biggest bridge in my world.   That’s Canada to the right.

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Baie Comeau (2013) upbound under the Thousand Islands Bridge

The bridge was completed in 1937, weeks ahead of schedule.  Canada, which appears to have no equivalent of the US-Jones Act, uses China-built vessels like Baie Comeau.  I saw a one-year-older sister here last October.

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Over in Kingston, I learned this vintage but functional crane today had been mounted on a barge and used in the Thousand Island Bridge construction back in the 1930s. There are several cranes of this design along the Erie Canal, some also still functional.  For one, check out the sixth photo here.

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In an archipelago called “thousand islands,” there’s need for lots of boats for commuting and transport.  Check out the lines of the white-hulled 25′ boat to the right.  Now check photos seven and eight in this post.  Spirit of Freeport is also a 25′ and it crossed the Atlantic!  A few more perspectives of Spirit of Freeport can be seen here, scroll through. To hear builder Al Grover, click here.

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Click here for info on Jolly Island.

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The proximity of Antique Boat Museum may draw classics here, wherever they might have been built.  Anyone identify the make?

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Vikingbank has an interesting bow.

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Clayton waterside with St. Mary’s steeple to the right.

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Check out the etymology of “delfzijl

R/V Seth Green is a fisheries research vessel based in Cape Vincent.  Last year I caught the christening of another Lake Ontario research vessel here.

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Wilf Seymour used to be M. Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will add more photos from this watershed later.

Many thanks to Seaway Marine Group for conveyance.

 

Up, up,

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and in.  All new builds follow the same arc, even though the details differ.  Check out the splash of Onrust here over a half decade back.  Here’s how the water came up to meet Pegasus back five years ago.

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To finish the dory, there’s a trip

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through the Kills and

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across Raritan Bay to get to Cheesequake Creek.  Pam writes, “Carl Baronowshi, owner of the yard was helpful in determining the rig. Traditionally it would have been a push the boom up alongside the mast and unstep the whole business and lay it in the boat. I wasn’t strong enough to list the mast out of the step without raising havoc if it got out of the step, John help me figure out a gooseneck and track arrangement so we could lower the sail in a less cumbersome manner.”

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Ibis is launched,

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boarded, and

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eager to what she was built for.

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More photos follow.

 

The last photo of yesterday’s post here showed a dory in the beginning stages of construction.  Its placement there conforms to Chekhov’s gun principle.  So here’s what follows.  Maybe I should call this post  . . .” in the shadow of an old building and protected by the body of a Chinese laundry truck,  Ibis hatches, fledges, and more . . .” but that would be rather long.   So just enjoy.

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Garboards in place,

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planks fastened and plugs driven . . .  About the clamps, Pam says “they are simple and brilliant. They have really long jaws to be able to reach across a plank to clamp the new plank to the one already in place. Wedges get tapped into the other end to tighten the grip.”

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Sheer strake in place,  and now

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it’s time to roll her over.

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“Dories are usually built on their frames which act as the mold stations – I would do it that way if I built another dory. We used the mold stations and steam bent frames to go into the boat. Steam bending is an experience, although hair-raising… handling a hot piece of wood, and maneuvering clamps quickly before wood cools… It is hugely satisfying though.”

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Ibis has a beautiful bow, soon to be cutting through sixth boro waters

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Again, many thanks to Pamela Hepburn for use of her photos and in some cases, her commentary.

 

 

 

Can you figure this one out?

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Wooden hull, 62′ loa . . .

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it’s Revolution, and my first time to see it although I’ve known of it for some time through this and this.

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These photos taken today by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to have more questions answered soon . .  like what did she look like as Argo . . . and while working in Boston, Boothbay, and in the sixth boro as a fire boat.  ??

It’s really this although it looks like this.  They’re actually supposed to look like this, NOT heart-shaped.

Enough frivolity.  Be nice today and loving.

All these photos I took in Brooklyn locations in September  2009.

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Brooklyn Navy yard. . . .

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and

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Atlantic Basin.

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Some decades ago, I knew a schooner in Newburyport called Hearts Desire, but otherwise, there is a dearth of vessels with nomenclaturus valentinus.  Why?

Although bowsprite put something different up, here’s my favorite one of her past V-day posts.

Here was a post I did in early spring 2013.  She went to Portland, Maine for the work, and this morning

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she returned to South Street Seaport Museum pier, about 36 hours travel out of Gloucester.

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The timing was perfect for me . . . as I’m currently reading A Dream of Tall Ships, Peter Stanford’s account of the years from 1965–1974, when as the subtitle of the book has it, a story of “how NYers came together to save the city’s sailing-ship waterfront.”  Well . . . round 1, at least.

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Lettie looked glorious in the morning sun, nestling back beside Ambrose, but I couldn’t help looking especially closely at the bow.  I’d just read this account the day before in Stanford’s book, a recollection about the vessel then-called Caviare in September 1968

“there was one thing that needed replacing, which not vital to the schooner’s structure, mattered a great deal to her appearance.  This was the gammon knee, an oak extension of the stem arching forward under the bowsprit, which nicely completes the sweeping curve of the clipper bow.  The old schooner’s gammon knee had been chopped back into a stump to allow a heavy rope fender to be slung under the bow when she’d been adapted for work as a tug.”

Wow!  That’s one old foto I’d love to see, this vessel, with a rope bow fender, pushing a barge.  Anyone have such a foto?

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Lettie‘s back, and so is this fleet.  Maybe Lettie‘d love to come out fishing with them?  Vessel in the distance is Pati R. Moran.   Brown fishboat in the foreground is Eastern Welder.

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All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp.

If you’re going to the market event in Manhattan today, look for signs like this, painted what must be Ceres

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blue.  This is the west end of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, closest to Vinegar Hill.   Beyond the East River there, protruding into the sky to the right, that’s the empire State Building.   Ceres has arrived, and

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on schedule!

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Inside this warehouse, I picked up my order of Ricker Hill Orchards vinegar and Champlain Valley Apiaries  honey.

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Excuse the poor quality foto.  Could someone explain the dried (?) birds’ wings?

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There was seaweed . . .

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pumpkins,

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wild artichokes,   and much much more.

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Agger Fish–right next to the warehouse–was a sponsor of the Brooklyn event, as were Brooklyn Grange, triple island, and Marlow & Daughters.

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Morgan O’Kane played, parents shopped and talked, and and kids danced.

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If you’re local and  have time, get down to the New Amsterdam Market today . . . on the opposite side of the river here.

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Congratulations to Erik and the team for a very big accomplishment.  Although there’s lots of work left this season, season two starts up soon.   Here’s some preliminary info on the vessel, which was modified in the construction. In case you’re wondering . . . Erik’s estimate is that Ceres sailed only about twenty percent of the trip.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in reporting.

Here, here, and here are my previous Ceres posts.   Last but not the least least . . . it’s bowsprite’s rendering.  Here’s the NYTimes version.

Whatzit?!!  in the background with the classy leeboards.  In the foreground, of course, it’s the world-infamous tug44, and in its own lair near the hideaway of Fred, in the north country approximately 200 miles north of the sixth boro.

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It’s the sailing freighter Ceres, a moving cornucopia of all things edible, sixth boro bound

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with auxiliary power for the Canals, where sailing is not an option.

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Here Ceres exits Lock C-7.

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At the tiller, it looks like Steve Schwartz, whose inimitable idea of a figurehead appears in foto 8 here affixed to sloop Woody Guthrie.

Much appreciation to Fred Wehner for all fotos here.   Fair winds to Ceres.

Back in November 2009, I did this post and I’ll repost two of my fotos from then, showing a 1940 Chris Craft and a 1939 ACF, slightly tweaked here

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and here.

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Earlier this week, Darrin Rice got these followup pics.

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I find these poignant, yet there is some buoyancy in that

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it appears this old vessel is being taken apart with care so that

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planks and sections of them can be recycled, evoking what’s happening nearby.   You couldn’t do this with old fiberglass.

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Many thanks to Darrin Rice for these fotos.

Here’s a site dedicated to antique and classic wooden boats in varying states of repair.

Here are some tugster posts on projects and collections.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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